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Lifestyle => Tha G-Spot => Topic started by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 16, 2002, 10:51:41 PM

Title: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 16, 2002, 10:51:41 PM
(this is some crazy shit :()
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
In Los Angeles the 18th Street gang is considered the largest gang in Los Angeles County. It is estimated that there are close to 20,000 members, most of them Mexican and Chicanos males. Some estimates are as low as 8,000, but this low estimate still makes them the largest gang in the county.
The 18th Street Gang is actually a collection of several smaller gangs, making them the most fragmented gang in the County. The individual factions can number from 50 to several hundred members each. Factions of the 18th Streets are dispersed throughout the county in San Fernando Valley, the San Gabriel Valley, the South Bay, South Los Angeles, and Downtown Los Angeles just to name a few. The Los Angeles District Attorney's Office has three gang injunctions against the 18th Street Gangs; two in the Rampart Division and one in the Southwest Division of the LAPD. The Rampart injunctions are currently under review.

Certain factions in South Los Angeles are fueding with Black gangs, such as the Black P Stones from the West Adams area and the Black P Stones from the Jungles of Los Angeles. They have also been fueding with the NeighborHood Rollin 20s Blood.
"The spread of 18th Street's violence is shown by 154 murders linked to the gang from 1985 to 1995. This only plots homicides within Los Angeles where the killers have been tied to the gang."
to step across racial lines allowed rapid and unchecked growth in the gang's membership, which was largely composed of immigrants and multi-racial youths.  18th Street also recruited heavily from the populations of illegal immigrants entering the United States from Mexico and South/Central America.  Although primarily composed of Hispanics, some cliques of 18th Street have recruited African Americans, Asians, Caucasians, and Native Americans.  Some tagger crews who operated within 18th Street territory were also actively recruited, but only if the crews had a reputation for violence.  For example, West Side 18th Street "jumped in" 50 members of a tagger crew known as KWS, Kings With Style.  KWS members were known by law enforcement to be involved in robbery, assaults, drive-by shootings, and murder.

Uniquely, the 18th Street gang members, though primarily turf-oriented, also travel to other areas and states for membership recruitment and illegal activities.  This tendency to travel explains 18th Street's wide-scale presence in many different states.  However, while 18th Street members have dispersed the gang through relocation and targeted recruitment, the overall research on gangs still supports the idea that most gangs are indigenous to their areas of origination.  Very few gangs send members out of state to recruit new members and to establish new cliques or sets of their gang.  The 18th Street gang was the first Hispanic street gang to do this.  Law enforcement intelligence supports the assumption that some of these recruits have been sent out with a specific purpose.  At one time, intelligence indicated that "tagger crews" that were jumped in to 18th Street became "tax" collectors, enforcers, and narcotics distributors.
carjacking, drive-by shootings, drug sales, arms trafficking, extortion, rape, murder for hire, and murder.  National and international drug trafficking seems to be 18th Street's main criminal activity.  Intelligence indicates that 18th street has established ties with the Mexican and Columbian drug cartels, which has impacted the Southwest border states in particular.  Because of the large amount of drugs which 18th Street distributes and sells, the gang also has ties to the Mexican Mafia prison gang and many black street gangs.  The connection between 18th Street and drug activity appears strong.  Members 18th Street may also conceal their membership status, which may make prosecuting 18th Street drug cases more difficult. This gang also has been known to market "rock" cocaine, marijuana, tar heroin, and methamphetamine.  As the methamphetamine market continues to expand across the United States, it can be expected that 18th Street's street presence will similarly expand, leading to encounters with 18th Street in areas of the U.S. which have not previously seen this gang.

Tax collection is another area of criminal activity where 18th Street is well established.  Typically, in an area that is claimed as territory by 18th Street, gang members will collect a tax from any business:  legitimate or criminal.  The potential taxpayers include street vendors, shop owners, prostitutes, and drug dealers, as well as the businesses which exist in the neighborhood.  Members of 18th Street then threaten to kill any individual who refuses to pay the tax.  In 1994 alone, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office prosecuted 30 murders that were the result of hits made by 18th Street gang members for failure to pay taxes.






Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 16, 2002, 11:06:51 PM
As law enforcement puts pressure on the drug and violent criminal activities, some 18th Street gang members have become involved in non-violent criminal enterprises such as creating fraudulent Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) identification cards, immigration papers, credit cards, bus passes, and even food stamps.  The gang was once active in the cellular telephone cloning market, but this activity is on the decline due to the introduction of digital cellular telephone service.

CHARACTERISTICS
Members of 18th Street frequently adorn their bodies with tattoos.  The most common tattoo is that of the number 18 (XVIII).  The tattoos can be located anywhere on the body, and some members will cover their entire body with 18th Street tattoos, including placing an 18 on their foreheads or above their eyebrows.  The number "666" can also be used to represent 18th Street.  The tattoos also might indicate the clique of 18th Street to which the individual belongs.

18th Street gang members wear many types of clothing.  The colors most often seen are brown or black pants and a white T-shirt.  Some 18th Street gang members also wear clothing from professional sports teams.  The presence of 18th Street in a new community is usually discovered when graffiti appears.  18th Street uses graffiti to mark their turf, in the same manner used by most traditional Hispanic street gangs.

TRENDS
Some cliques of 18th Street have access to their own arsenal of weapons.  Therefore, many law enforcement officers consider 18th Street gang members to be armed and dangerous during every encounter.  Some 18th Street gang members in Los Angeles have access to automatic weapons, including Tech 9s, Mac 10s, Mac 11s, and AK-47s.  It is common for 18th Street gang members to be armed with .25 and .380 caliber handguns, so caution should be used during field contacts.  The 18th Street gang, as a whole, has a reputation for being extremely violent and ruthless.  The possession and use of firearms only adds to this reputation.

Some cliques of 18th Street seem to be evolving to a higher level of sophistication and organization.  This is probably due to connections the gang has maintained with the Mexican and Columbian drug cartels. Law enforcement projections and intelligence indicate that 18th Street gang membership will continue to grow, especially outside of California as new drug markets are established.  The gang's propensity for violence is also expected to increase.

18th Street is often referred to as the "Children's Army" due to its recruitment of elementary and middle-school aged youth.  The gang specializes in early indoctrination to the rules of the gang with these young members, who are told that leaving the gang will result in their death or the deaths of their loved ones.  Thus, the gang's influence on its members is profound.  One mother, during interviews with criminal justice professionals working with her young son, stated: "A boss from 18th Street calls my son and tells him what to do."  Her son, a juvenile, had tattooed the number 18 on his forehead.  She further stated:  "Los Angeles gang members are not like [other] gang members.  [The Los Angeles gang members] are more ruthless, commit more murders, deal more drugs."  Her son told his probation officer:  "I cannot avoid associations with other 18th Street gang members because they call me all the time, and if I don't go with them, they will say I am a ranker.  There are rules you have to follow.  There is only one way out, and that's in a body bag."  

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 16, 2002, 11:13:57 PM
Alabama
Bloods, Crips, Black Gangster Disciples, East Coast Crips, Insane Gangster Disciples, Playboy Gangster Crips, Skinheads
Gangs in Prison - Arizona Aryan Brotherhood, Vice Lords

Alaska
Bloods, Crips, Mara Salvatrucha, Tiny Rascal Gangsters
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, La Raza, Skinheads

Arizona
Bloods and Crips (numerous sets of each), Brown Mexican Pride, Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings, Mau Mau, Nazi Low Riders,  Norteņos, Sureņos. Wetback Power
Gangs in Prison - Arizona Aryan Brotherhood, Arizona's New Mexican Mafia, Arizona's Old Mexican Mafia, Aryan Brotherhood. Border Brothers, Mau Mau, Warrior Society

Arkansas
Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Mara Salvatrucha, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood

California
Ba Hala Na, Bloods and Crips (numerous sets of each), Black Gangster Disciples, Florencia 13, Norteņos, Skinheads, Supreme White Power, Sureņo 13, Tiny Rascal Gangsters, 18th Street
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Guerrilla Family, Bloods, Bull Dogs (F-14), Crips, La Nuestra Familia, Mexican Mafia, Nazi Low Riders, Northern Structure, Texas Syndicate

Colorado
Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, (numerous sets of each) Mexican Mafia, Ku Klux Klan, Skinheads, Sureņo 13, Tiny Rascal Gangsters, Vatos Locos, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Guerrilla Family, Dirty White Boys, La Nuestra Familia, Mexican Mafia, New Mexico Syndicate, Texas Syndicate

Latin Kings, La Ņeta, Los Solidos
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, La Ņeta, Latin Kings, Los Solidos

Delaware
Dog Pound
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Latin Kings

Florida
Crips (numerous sets), Gangster Disciples, Insane Gangster Disciples, Latin kings
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Five Percenters, Gangster Disciples, Insane Gangster Disciples, Jamaican Posse, La Familia, La Raza, Latin Kings, Skinheads

Georgia
Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods and Crips (numerous sets), Gangster Disciples, La Raza, Latin Kings, Mara Salvatrucha, Norteņos, Sur 13, Sureņos 13, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Five Percenters, Skinheads

Idaho
Black Gangster Disciples, Crips, Dog Pound, Skinheads, Sur 13, Sureņo13, White Aryan Resistance
Gangs in Prison - Unknown

Illinois
Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, El Rukns, Four Corner Hustlers, Gangster Disciples, Harrison Gents, Imperial Gangsters, Imperial Vice Lords, La Familia, La Raza, Latin Kings, Latin Queens, Maniac Latin Disciples, Mickey Cobras, Pachucos, Sisters of the Struggle, Sureņos 13, Two Two Boys, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, El Rukns, Latin Kings, Mickey Cobras, Vice Lords

Indiana
Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, Four Corner Hustlers, Gangster Disciples, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Kings, La Raza, Mexican Mafia, Vatos Locos, Skinheads, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Vice Lords

Iowa
Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Crips, El Rukns, Four Corner Hustlers, Gangster Disciples, Insane Vice Lords, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Kings, Skinheads, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Arizona Aryan Brotherhood, Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Crips, Dirty White Boys, Latin Kings, Vice Lords

Kansas
Asian Boyz, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips (numerous sets), Four Corner Hustlers, Gangster Disciples, Insane Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings, Latin Queens, Norteņos, Sureņos 13, Vatos Locos, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Skinheads, Vice Lords

Kentucky
Asian Boyz, Black Gangster Disciples, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, El Rukns, Gangster Disciples

Louisiana
Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Latin Kings
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Bloods, Crips



Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 16, 2002, 11:16:53 PM
Maine
Asian Boyz, Crips, Latin Kings, Tiny Rascal Gangsters
Gangs in Prison - Crips, Latin Kings

Maryland
Asian Boyz, Crips, Mara Salvatrucha, Skinheads
Gangs in Prison - Unknown

Massachusetts
Almighty Latin King & Queen Nation, La Familia, La Ņeta, Latin Kings, Los Solidos, Skinheads
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Asian Boyz, Black Gangster Disciples, Black Guerrilla Family, Bloods, Crips, Five Percenters, Jamaican Posses, Ku Klux Klan, La Familia, La Nuestra Familia, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Kings, La Ņeta, Skinheads, Vice Lords

Michigan
Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings, Tiny Rascal Gangsters, Vice Lords, Young Guns
Gangs in Prison - Latin Kings, Vice Lords, Young Guns

Minnesota
Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, Latin Kings, Vice Lords

Mississippi
Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, Conservative Vice Lords, Four Corner Hustlers, Gangster Disciples, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Arizona Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, El Rukns, Four Corner Hustlers, Simon City Royals, Vice Lords

Missouri
Aryan Brotherhood, Asian Boyz, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods (numerous sets), Crips (numerous sets), Gangster Disciples, La Familia, Latin Kings, Mexican Mafia, Skinheads, Sureņos 13, Vice Lords
Gangs in Prison - Unknown

Montana
Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Insane Gangster Disciples, Sureņos
Gangs in Prison - Unknown

Nebraska
18th Street, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Conservative Vice Lords, Crips, Gangster Disciples, La Raza, Latin Kings, Mara Salvatrucha, Mexican Mafia, Surenos 13,
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Crips, Latin Kings, Mexican Mafia

Nevada
Asian Boys, Ba Hala Na, Bloods, Crips, Latin Kings, Mara Salvatrucha, Mara Villa, Nazi Low Riders, Norteņos, Skinheads, Sureņos 13
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Bulldogs (F-14), Crips, Gangster Disciples, La Nuestra Familia, Latin Kings, Mexican Mafia, Northern Structure

New Hampshire
Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Latin Kings, Ņeta, Tiny Rascal Gangsters
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings

New Jersey
Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation, Bloods, Crips, Dog Pound, Dominicans Don't Play, Five Percenters (5%), G 27, La Familia, Latin Kings, Los Solidos, MS 13, Ņeta, Vatos Locos, Zulu Nation
Gangs in Prisons - Aryan Brotherhood, Afrikan Liberation Army, Afrikan National Ujamaa, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Conservative Vice Lords, Crips, Five Percenters, G-27, Ku Klux Klan, La Familia, Latin Kings, Ņeta, Skinheads,

New Mexico
Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Marielitos, Sureņos
Gangs in Prison - 18th Street, Aryan Brotherhood, Bloods, Crips, New Mexico Syndicate, Sureņos 13, Texas Syndicate

New York
Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation, Black Guerrilla Family, Bloods, Born to Kill, Crips, Five Percenters, Gangster Disciples, Jamaican Posse, La Familia, La Raza, Los Solidos, Mara Salvatrucha, Mexican Mafia, Ņetas, Supreme White Power, Toy Soldiers, Untouchables, Young Guns,
Gangs in Prison - Bloods, Five Percenters, Latin Kings, Ņetas

North Carolina
18th Street, Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings,
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, Crips, Five Percenters, Gangster Disciples

North Dakota
Bloods, Crips, Sureņos 13,
Gangs in Prison - Unknown

OHIO
Bloods, Conservative Vice Lords, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Insane Spanish Cobras, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Kings, Vice Lords,
Gangs in Prison - Arizona Aryan Brotherhood, Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Five Percenters, Latin Kings, Mexican Mafia

Oklahoma
Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Born To Kill, Confederate Hammerskins, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Insane Gangster Disciples, Jamaican Posse, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Counts, Latin Kings, Skinheads, Vice Lords, White Aryan Resistance
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Bloods, Crips, Dirty White Boys, Gangster Disciples, Mexican Mafia, Mexikanemi

Oregon
Asian Boys, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Kings, Mexican Mafia, Neo-Nazis, Norteņos, Skinheads, Sureņos, Varrio Locos
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Bloods, Crips, Skinheads

Pennsylvania
Almighty Latin Kings Nation, Aryan Brotherhood, Asian Boyz, Bloods, Crips, Dog Pound, Five Percenters, Gangster Disciples, Ku Klux Klan, Skinheads, Tiny Rascal Gangsters, Vatos Locos
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Bloods, Crips, La Nuestra Familia, Latin Kings, Ņeta, Young Guns

Rhode Island
Street Gangs - Unknown
Gangs in Prison - Five Percenters, Latin Kings, Los Solidos

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 16, 2002, 11:18:10 PM
South Carolina
Almighty Latin Kings Nation, Aryan Brotherhood, Asian Boyz, Black Gangster Disciples, Black Mafia, Bloods, Brothers of the Struggle, Crips, Dirty White Boys, Five Percenters, Gangster Disciples, Insane Gangster Disciples, Ku Klux Klan, Mexican Mafia, Neo-Nazi, Nuestra Familia, Skinheads, Untouchables, Vatos Locos, Vice Lords, Young Guns
Gangs in Prison - Black Gangster Disciples, Black Mafia, Bloods, Crips, Five Percenters, Mexican Mafia, Young Guns

South Dakota
Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Ku Klux Klan, Latin Kings, Norteņos 14, Skinheads, Sureņos 13, Vice Lords

Tennessee
Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Confederate Hammerskins, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Imperial Vice Lords, Insane Gangster Disciples, Ku Klux Klan
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood

Texas
Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods (numerous sets), Crips (numerous sets), Latin Kings, Mara Salvatrucha, Skinheads, Sureņos 13, Untouchables,
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, Barrio Azteca, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Hermanos Pistoleros Latinos, Latin Kings, Mandingo Warriors, Mexican Mafia, Raza Unida, Texas Mafia, Texas Syndicate

Utah
18th Street, Asian Boys, Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Nortenos, Sinaloan Cowboys, Skinheads, Straight Edgers, Sureņos 13, Tiny Rascal Gangsters, Vice Lords, White Supreme Power
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Guerrilla Family, Mexican Mafia, Sureņos 13

Vermont
Los Solidos
Gangs in Prison - Los Solidos

Virginia
Bloods, Crips, Insane Gangster Disciples, Mara Salvatrucha, Tiny Rascal Gangsters,
Gangs in Prison - 18th Street, Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Black Guerrilla Family, El Rukns, Five Percenters, Ku Klux Klan, La Nuestra Family, La Raza, Skinheads

Washington
18th Street, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Crips, Ku Klux Klan, Mara Salvatrucha, Norteņos, Skinheads, Sureņos, Tiny Rascal Gangsters
Gangs in Prison - 18th Street, Aryan Brotherhood, Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, Black Gangster Disciples, Bloods, Bull Dogs (F-14), Crips, Gangster Disciples, Latin Kings, Mara Salvatrucha, Mexican Mafia, Northern Structure, Skinheads, Texas Syndicate, Vice Lords, White Aryan Resistance

West Virginia
Crips, Simon City Royals
Gangs in Prison - Unknown

Wisconsin
Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, Four Corner Hustlers, Gangster Disciples, Imperial Gangster Disciples, Latin King, Maniac Latin Disciples, Mickey Cobras, Orchestra Albany, Vatos Locos, Vice Lords,
Gangs in Prison - Aryan Brotherhood, Black Gangster Disciples, Black P Stones, Bloods, Crips, El Rukns, La Nuestra Familia, Latin Kings, Spanish Cobras, Vice Lords

Wyoming
Bloods, Crips, Skinheads
Gangs in Prison - Arizona Aryan Brotherhood, Aryan Brotherhood, Bloods, Crips, Mexican Mafia
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: bez on January 17, 2002, 06:41:21 AM
Dam if u typed all that u r 1 tit
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Dogg_Pound_Gangsta on January 17, 2002, 07:58:49 AM
shit thats some fucked up shit.  18 street gang are some crazy mawfuckas.  
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 08:42:41 AM
"Dam if u typed all that u r 1 tit"
Thanx
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:25:44 AM
"Street Gangs — Chicago Based or Influenced "
**********************************************
Chicago street gangs emerged in the 1960's when a "youth group" called the Black P-Stone Rangers developed into a criminal organization.
The group's leader, Jeff Fort, united the leaders of some 50 area street gangs into a single organization, calling it the Black P-Stone Nation.
The group was controlled by a 21-man commission, self-titled the "Main 21." The leaders projected the group as a socially conscious, self-help organization that would help uplift themselves and their community.
As a result of this premise, the group sought and obtained $1.4 million in federal anti-poverty funds. These funds were then used to support the group's illegal activities. A federal grand jury uncovered the funds mismanagement and Jeff Fort was sent to federal prison.
The perceived success of Fort's Black P-Stone Nation resulted in the formation of many other street gangs, that claimed to be politically and socially motivated. Of the groups that surfaced, many dropped to a level of disorganization, while others developed into sophisticated, highly organized groups involved in prostitution, robbery, burglary, extortion, and drug sales.Two very influential gangs, the Black Disciples, led by David Barksdale, and the Gangster Disciples, led by Larry Hoover, followed Fort's example and unified their gangs to form the Black Gangster Disciple Nation.
Throughout the 1970's, the Black P-Stone Nation and Black Gangster Disciple Nation controlled the Chicago drug trade and became bitter rivals expressing their anger by creating the bloodiest gang war in Chicago's history.
Many of the leaders and members of the Chicago gangs ended up in federal and state correctional facilities. The increased number of individual gangs created a need for immediate visual gang identification that would enable members to distinguish allies from enemies among the prison population.

During the 1980's, within the prison walls, gangs began separating into alliances. The two alliance names that emerged were the People Nation and Folk Nation.
All gangs that were originally aligned with the Black P-Stone Nation aligned with People Nation.
Those that were originally aligned with the Black Gangster Disciple Nation aligned with the Folk Nation.
Many gangs or "sets," as they are called, are aligned with one of the two Chicago alliances. The more prevalent groups are shown below by alliance.

"People Nation Sets"
Black P-Stone
Latin Kings
Vicelords
Spanish Lords
El Rukns
Bishops
Gaylords
Latin Counts
Kents
******************
"Folk Nation Sets"
Black Gangster Disciples
Black Disciples
Gangster Disciples
La Raza
Cobras
Eagles
Latin Disciples
Maniac Latin Disciples
Simon City Royals
Spanish Gangsters
Two Sixers
____________________________________________________
Mentality and Philosophy:

The "All for One, One for All" philosophy poses a significant threat; members demand participation in assaultive behavior by all members who are present.
The one-on-one fight of the past now becomes a full disturbance.

"Code of Conduct" terminologies include:
"Folk before family."
"I will not let my brother fall to a knee."
"All is All" and "All is Well" (People)
"All is One." (Folk)

Incidents often occur over trivial matters that are viewed as disrespectful by rival members.
Striking through a rival's graffiti or painting it upside down.
Drinking from a plastic cup belonging to a rival gang member.
Showing rival's hand signs upside down or crossing out a rival's hand-signs with another finger.
Breaking rival's symbols.

Rules and codes of conduct such as those mentioned above must be strictly followed. Those members who choose not to participate in a gang activity are subject to disciplinary action or "violations."

Violations can range from a beating, by fellow members for a given period of time, to death. Violation orders are often written out and signed by ranking members of the groups at their facility.

Violence associated with these groups is often disciplinary in nature.











Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:37:48 AM
"Latin Kings seen simply as criminals"
**********************************************
The Latin Kings street gang used the violence and secretiveness of its structure and organization for simple purposes - to commit crimes and get away with them, a federal prosecutor said Wednesday.
Sometimes Kings higher-ups gave orders for murders, Assistant U.S. Attorney Karine Moreno-Taxman said during closing arguments in the racketeering trial of five defendants. Other murders "just happened," she said.
"Does everything a King does need to be ordered?" she asked the jury. "Absolutely not. . . . If someone shoots you, you shoot back. All you need to know is someone is a flake or a rival and just deal with it."
Five alleged Kings members have been on trial since Oct. 10, when jury selection began. They are Andrew Acosta, Pedro Martinez, Antonio Mendez, Larry Olson and Wilfredo Vasquez.
Jurors have listened to more than 160 witnesses recite an almost numbing litany of casual violence that included killings, muggings, robberies, kidnappings and beatings.
Moreno-Taxman said Wednesday the Latin Kings divided the world into two groups: "people" and "folks." Gangs considered "people" used symbols incorporating five points; gangs considered "folks," or flakes, in the derogatory language of the Kings, use six-pointed symbols, she said.
"If someone can tell me what the difference is between five points and six points, I don't know, but people get killed over it," she said.
Moreno-Taxman, giving the government's view of what it proved during testimony, spoke at length about defendant Mendez, who is accused in the indictment of the May 1993 murder of 15-year-old Jenna Gonzales, whose body was found in the Root River Parkway.
Mendez, 25, was acquitted of the crime in a 1993 state court trial, and was the only defendant to testify in the current federal trial.
Gonzales was "a lovely girl," Moreno-Taxman said. But when Mendez was through with her, she said, "Jenna Gonzales was so severely beaten the only way they could identify her was through some jewelry she was wearing and her teeth."
Mendez believed, probably wrongly, that Gonzales had set up the killing of another gang member, Moreno-Taxman said.
Testimony during the trial indicated Gonzales had no gang connections, Moreno-Taxman said, but Mendez relied only on his own perceptions when he decided to kill her.
The Kings did not need much proof before acting against someone, she said.
"It can be a look, a belief, a flash, a mistake," she said.
Moreno-Taxman listed some of the inconsistencies in Mendez's testimony, and said, "He can't keep track of his lies."
All five of the defendants on trial originally were charged with both racketeering and racketeering conspiracy.
U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman dismissed at the government's request an attempted homicide charge against defendant Olson, however; that had the effect of wiping out the racketeering charge against him, though he still faces racketeering conspiracy and drug conspiracy charges.
Racketeering generally involves members of an organized group committing a number of crimes over time.
Olson, 26, the only defendant on trial not accused of participating in a homicide, "typifies the average Latin King" who "moved up the ranks and did his share of the dirty business," Moreno-Taxman said.
Olson held "Nation guns" - guns available to gang members for Latin Kings business - for the gang and helped run a drug house.
King leaders trusted Olson, she said, because every time police showed up at his house, "Larry Olson doesn't tell them what's going on."
Defendant Andrew Acosta, 26, is accused in the January 1994 slaying of Angelique Morales, who was shot to death as she sat in her car at a south side gas station.
Acosta also was acquitted in state court but acknowledged involvement in the crime during a later interview with an FBI agent and a Milwaukee police officer, Moreno-Taxman said.
Acosta's guilt was reflected in what he told them, she said.
The government alleged that Acosta killed Morales because she "disrespected" the Latin Kings, but there also was testimony that she was in the wrong place at a moment Acosta was upset with his girlfriend.
Pedro Martinez, 28, the oldest of the defendants, is suspected of being with Acosta in a car just before the shooting and helping Acosta leave the area afterward. Martinez, a former leader of the gang, also is accused of participating in the homicide.
"Pedro Martinez really loved to have weapons, and he was the one who had guns at his house and provided them to others," Moreno-Taxman said.
Martinez also was a drug dealer on the street, and still tried to direct violence against others when he was in prison, she said.
She said Wilfredo Vasquez, 23, was a latecomer to the Kings but clearly one of the most dangerous. Vasquez organized "hit squads" that he sent on killing missions and developed a Latin Kings security system.
"On some parts of the south side there are armed men with walkie-talkies, looking to see if some flakes are going to drive by," she said.
Vasquez, a leader of the Junior Kings, a subset of the Latin Kings, recruited people he knew to be capable of murder, Moreno-Taxman said. Then he taught them the ways of the Latin Kings and how to conceal their crimes, she said.
Vasquez is accused of a long list of crimes, including the September 1996 murder of Daryl Davis. The government alleges Vasquez shot Davis as the result of a gang dispute.
The five defendants were charged in a 1998 indictment that said 33 gang members were responsible for nine murders, 21 attempted murders, nine robberies, three arsons and an attempted arson, five kidnappings and a drug trafficking conspiracy. A 34th defendant was added later.
Twenty-eight defendants reached plea agreements with the government and one remains at large.
After Moreno-Taxman finishes, defense lawyers will give their closing arguments.


Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:41:51 AM
"Origin of Street Gangs"
**********************************************
Gangs in one form or another have been around for hundreds of years. Pirates were probably some of the original bad gangs. The groups that traditionally come to mind when one thinks of modern day gangs are the Crips and the Bloods from California. The origins of the Crips and Bloods can be traced to the late 60's, and the gang culture is so ingrained on the west coast that many families have three and even four generations of gangsters residing in the same residence. Depending on whose figures you listen to (government officials have a tendency to downsize the numbers), L.A. gangs number between 800 and 1000, with anywhere from 120,000 to 220,000 members. As of January, 1993, we have identified about 40 named street gangs in Pulaski County with 800 - 1000 identified members. These numbers are often debated, and depending on whose criteria is used to decide who is and is not a gangbanger. The figures could be considerably higher.African Americans have a 75 year history a street gang involvement in Los Angeles, younger that its Latino counterparts in Los Angeles, namely the Mexicans, who date back to as early as 1900. African-American gangs first appeared in Los Angeles in the 1920's in the downtown area of Los Angeles where they first settled. During the years to follow, African-Americans began to move southward from downtown Los Angeles, down Central Avenue towards Slauson Ave. Between Slauson Avenue and Firestone (Manchester), during the 20's and 30's was occupied primarily by white residents, but just south of Firestone, African-American populations were growing. In 1968, youths who were too young to participate in the movement with organizations like the Black Panther Party and US Ordanization, began to form their own organizations. Raymond Washington a 15 year old youth who attended Fremont High School, Locke High School and who frequented the area of Washington High School in Los Angeles got together a few youths and started a gang called the Baby Avenues. The Avenues was a gang of older youths who had been active since the early 1960's, and Raymond Washington, along with Stanley "Tookie" Williams looked-up to and admired the Avenue Boys. So in 1968 he created the baby Avenues, and to represent the new genreation of this gang he called it the Avenue Cribs, or Baby Avenues. The word Crip is a derivative of the word Crib, but how the use of Crip occured is not clear according to the available literature, but I will discuss this more in depth in a future publication. By early 1972, the use of "Crip" had been entrentched into Los Angeles Gang culture. By 1980 there were 30,000 gangs members in Los Angeles County. Today there are over 300 Blood and Crip gangs in Los Angeles County. Around the nation they can also be found in over 100 American Cities. Some gang members have migrated to these cities from Los Angeles, and also youths from other cities have copied Los Angeles gang culture. There is an estimated 150,000 gang members in Los Angeles County.

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:44:07 AM
"Street Gangs in Amerca today."
**********************************************
H I S P A N I C   S T R E E T   G A N G S

Hispanic gangs began forming in California during the early 1920s. They started as looseknit groups banding together for unity and socializing in the barrios (neighborhoods) where the same culture, customs, and language prevailed. Gang members were male youths ranging from 14- to 20-years-old. Property crimes such as burglary, strong-arm robbery, and vandalism were their crimes of choice. These gangs had no formal structure nor leadership. They were very defensive of their barrio, and they would protect it with a vengeance. Gang fights occurred between rival gangs as a result of disputes, turf differences, or transgressions--whether real or imaginary. Often, their weapons included knives, zip guns, chains, clubs, rocks, and bottles. The commission of a crime became a way of gaining status within the gang. Imprisonment in the California Youth Authority or the California Department of Corrections earned a gang member great stature with other gang members. By the 1980s, these gangs began targeting their communities and surrounding neighborhoods for drive-by shootings, assaults, murders, and other felonious crimes. Violence became a way of life. The gangs developed some organization and structure, and leaders emerged from the ranks of older gang members who had been stabbed or shot in gang fights or released from the youth authority or prison. Known as "veteranos," these gang leaders began to recruit new members and train them in gang-related criminal activities. They continued to be turf oriented, and gang fights progressed to gang wars. The age span for gang members widened, encompassing male youths ranging from 12- to 25-years-old who were willing to fight and die for the gang. Most of the gangs required new members to commit a crime, such as stealing a car or committing a burglary or robbery, before becoming a gang member. As the Hispanic gang members evolved, they established unique trademarks such tattoos, hand signs, monikers, and graffiti. Elaborate tattoos depicting the initials or name of a gang symbolized loyalty to a particular gang. Hand signs formed the letters of the gang's initials. Monikers were names assumed by--or given to--gang members, and they were usually retained for life. Intricate graffiti--or placa--clearly marked the gang's territorial boundaries and served as a warning to rival gangs. Gang members used these distinguishing characteristics to demonstrate gang allegiance, strengthen gang participation, and challenge rival gangs. The Department of Justice estimates there could be as many as 95,000 Hispanic gang members in California today. Located in all of the major metropolitan cities, these gangs vary in size from a few members to several hundred. The gang members range in age from 12- to 40-years-old, and many are second- or third-generation gang members. Adult Hispanic gang members recruit and use juvenile gang members to commit crimes or carry weapons because juveniles are subject to less severe sentences compared to adult penalties. Juvenile gang members are often arrested numerous times before actually serving time in jail or the California Youth Authority. Recruitment of new gang members often requires the prospective member to commit a drive-by shooting or some other form of felonious assault. Loyalty to their gang usually extends to their death. Reliance on tattoos, hand signs, and graffiti continues to dominate the gangs' characteristics. These symbols are frequently used to threaten rival gangs besides endorsing allegiance to their own gang. Their criminal activities now range from robberies, burglaries, grand thefts, vehicle thefts, receiving stolen property to assaults, batteries, drive-by shootings, and murders. They are becoming involved as entrepreneurs in the selling of narcotics--particularly PCP, Mexican tar heroin, methamphetamine, and marijuana. The gangs' arsenals have expanded to large-caliber handguns, shotguns, and automatic weapons; and their crimes are becoming more violent. Hispanic gang members were responsible for approximately 80 gang-related drive-by shootings in Stockton, California, during 1991. Gang members will attack rival gangs in defense of their turf. The Eastside Longos--a Hispanic gang in Long Beach, California--has been involved in a gang war since October 1989 with the Tiny Rascal Gangsters--a Cambodian gang also located in Long Beach and in several other parts of the state including Fresno and San Diego. Drive-by shootings and assaults between these two gangs have resulted in 16 killings thus far. Law enforcement is an increasing target of gang violence. Hispanic gangs in the Los Angeles area, such as the Harbor City and the "Crazy," have attacked both on and off-duty officers. A few of the gangs are beginning to recruit non-Hispanic gang members, and some Hispanic gang members are joining different ethnic gangs. Various Hispanic gangs are aligning with other ethnic gangs, usually from the same neighborhood. This affiliation allows them more neighborhood protection from rival gangs. Hispanic female gangs are starting to evolve exclusive of the traditionally male-dominated Hispanic gangs. Some of the female gang members, such as the Fresno Bulldog Babes, are participating in drive-by shootings, auto thefts, and assaults.



Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:46:26 AM
A F R I C A N  A M E R I C A N  S T R E E T  G A N G S

African American gangs began forming in California during the 1920s. They were not territorial; rather, they were loose associations, unorganized, and rarely violent. They did not identify with graffiti, monikers, or other gang characteristics. These early gangs consisted generally of family members and neighborhood friends who involved themselves in limited criminal activities designed to perpetrate a "tough guy" image and to provide an easy means of obtaining money. From 1955 to 1965, the African American gangs increased with larger memberships and operated primarily in south central Los Angeles and Compton. This was partly due to more African American youths bonding together for protection from rival gangs. It was not until the late 1960s when the Crips and Bloods--the two most violent and criminally active African American gangs--originated. The Crips began forming in southeast Los Angeles by terrorizing local neighborhoods and schools with assaults and strong-arm robberies. They developed a reputation for being the most fierce and feared gang in the Los Angeles area. Other African American gangs formed at about the same time to protect themselves from the Crips. One such gang was the Bloods, which originated in and around the Piru Street area in Compton, California; thus, some Bloods gangs are referred to as Piru gangs. The Bloods, which were outnumbered at the time by the Crips three to one, became the second, most vicious African American gang in the Los Angeles area. Both the Crips and Bloods eventually divided into numerous, smaller gangs (or "sets") during the 1970s. They kept the Crips' and Bloods' (Piru) name, spread throughout Los Angeles County, and began to claim certain neighborhoods as their territory. Their gang rivalry became vicious and bloody. By 1980, there were approximately 15,000 Crips and Bloods gang members in and around the Los Angeles area. The gangs--or sets--ranged in size from a few gang members to several hundred and had little, if any, organized leadership. The typical age of a gang member varied from 14- to 24-years-old. Initiation into a gang required the prospective member to "jump in" and fight some of the members already in the gang. Another initiation rite required them to commit a crime within the neighborhood or an assault against rival gang members. They remained territorial and motivated to protect their neighborhoods from rival gang members. They established unique and basic trademarks such as colors, monikers, graffiti, and hand signs. The color blue was adopted by the Crips as a symbol of gang recognition; red became the color of the Bloods. Monikers--such as "Killer Dog," "12-Gauge," and "Cop Killer"--often reflected their criminal abilities or their ferociousness as gang members. Graffiti identified the gang and hand signs displayed symbols--usually letters--unique to the name of their gang. It was not unusual for members to "flash" hand signs at rival gang members as a challenge to fight. They took great pride in displaying their colors and defending them against rival gangs. They were willing to die for the gang, especially in defense of their colors and neighborhood. It was not until the early 1980s that the era of drive-by shootings began. They became involved in a variety of neighborhood crimes such as burglary; robbery; assault; and the selling of marijuana, LSD, and PCP. The issue of gang involvement in narcotics trafficking was generally considered to be of a minor nature prior to the 1980s. However, by 1983, African American Los Angeles gangs seized upon the availability of narcotics, particularly crack, as a means of income. Crack had supplemented cocaine as the most popular illicit drug of choice. Prime reasons for the widespread use of crack were its ease of conversion for smoking, the rapid onset of its effect on the user, and its comparatively inexpensive price. The migration of African American Los Angeles gang members during the 1980s to other United States cities, often for reasons other than some vast gang-inspired conspiracy, resulted in the spread of crack sales and an attendant wave of violence. This spread of crack sales can be traced back to the gang members' family ties in these cities and to the lure of quick profits. These two reasons provided most of the inspiration and motivation for the transplanted gang members. Considerable diversity is displayed by Crips and Bloods gangs and their members in narcotics trafficking, which allows for different levels of involvement from narcotic selling by adolescents to the more important roles of directing narcotics trafficking activities. In the past, an individual's age, physical structure, and arrest record were often principal factors in determining gang hierarchy; money derived from narcotic sales soon became the symbol which signified power and status.

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:48:13 AM
A S I A N  S T R E E T  G A N G S

Vietnamese, Laotian, and Cambodian gangs represent the bulk of the Asian criminal street gang problem in California. It was not until the late 1970s that Vietnamese gangs began to emerge, followed by Laotian and Cambodian gangs in the early 1980s. These gangs ranged in size from 5 to 200 gang members; and their crimes included residential and business robberies, auto thefts, and burglaries. Rarely were they involved in drive-by shootings. The gang members varied in age from 15- to 25-years-old, and the older gang members were usually the leaders. Early formation of Asian gangs was loose-knit, and the gang members did not associate with each other on a continuous basis. They had little, if any, loyalty to a particular gang. Unlike Hispanic and African American gangs, Asian. gangs began with no unique Characteristics such as tattoos, hand signs, or graffiti. They had no names for their gangs, nor were they organized or turf oriented. There were no female Asian gangs and few female Asian gang members. By 1985, the Vietnamese gangs were committing organized auto thefts, extortions, firearms violations, home-invasion robberies, witness intimidations, assaults, and murders. They frequently used some type of weapon during the commission of their crimes. Vietnamese gang members began targeting their own communities with ruthless and vicious crimes and would often travel to various Vietnamese communities throughout the country to commit these crimes. The Laotian and Cambodian gangs remained predatory. They became turf oriented, and their crimes were random property crimes--usually involving some form of robbery or burglary. The Department of Justice estimates there could be as many as 15,000 Asian gang members in California today. They are still principally representative of Vietnamese, Laotian, and Cambodian gangs; and their gang members vary in age from 13- to 35-years-old. They continue to terrorize and prey upon their communities with violent crimes, occasionally resulting in murders. They have increased their traveling patterns from coast to coast committing these crimes. Their growing level of mobility and violence has made them a national crime problem.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 17, 2002, 09:50:36 AM
W H I T E  S T R E E T  G A N G S
White gangs have been forming in California for decades. Early white gangs were oriented around motorcycle gangs like the Hells Angels. Today's outlaw motorcycle gangs are not considered street gangs but, rather, organized crime groups. It was not until the late 1980s that the Skinheads were identified as the primary source of white street gang violence in this state. They were characterized by their shaven heads and white-supremacy philosophy and, for the most part, were factionalized and unorganized. Skinheads formed as racist gangs and were not turf oriented nor profit motivated. Their crimes ranged from vandalism and assaults to murders. Generally, targets of their crimes included non-white, Jewish, homeless, and homosexual individuals. Confrontations between the Skinheads and their targeted victims were often random, but they usually culminated in serious injury or death to the victim. The age of the Skinhead gang members varied from early teens to mid-20s. Both males and females belonged to the gang; and their weapons included baseball bats, knives, fists, and steel-toed boots. Similar to other gangs, Skinheads resort to graffiti, hand signs, and tattoos as typical gang characteristics. Common graffiti includes swastikas and lightning bolts. Most of the graffiti is used to deface property rather than indicate gang territory. Hand signs include both the Nazi salute and formation of the letters "W" and "P" for White Power. Tattoos include swastikas, Nazi flags, hooded Ku Klux Klansmen, and the letters SWP for Supreme White Power and WAR for White Aryan Resistance. Skinheads began to establish associations with some of the more traditional whitesupremacy groups--such as the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) and the White Aryan Resistance (WAR). Gang members would travel throughout California and other parts of the country to attend KKK and WAR rallies, marches, and demonstrations. Skinheads have participated in cross-burnings and become members of the American Klan in Modesto. Skinheads have attended the annual meeting of the Aryan Nations' Church, a Neo-Nazi organization in Idaho linked to The Order--a former domestic terrorist organization. Skinhead gang members identify with the imprisoned and deceased Order members as "prisoners of war" and "martyrs" in the white-supremacist movement. Skinheads from California were residing with Skinheads in Portland, Oregon, during December 1988 when the Portland Skinheads used a baseball bat to beat an Ethiopian immigrant to death. The Oregon Skinheads were arrested and convicted for the murder, and the San Diego leader of WAR was indicted by a federal grand jury and found guilty of inciting violence by encouraging them to commit the murder. He had sent Skinheads from California to teach the Skinheads in Oregon how to commit crimes of violence against minorities. The California Department of Justice estimates there could be as many as 5,000 white gang members in California today. The Skinheads, with approximately 400 members, remain the most violent of the white gangs. Although small in numbers when compared to other criminal street gangs, their potential for violence is significant. Skinheads remain racially motivated instead of being territorial or inspired to commit crimes for profit. They are still loose-knit and unorganized, but there is some evidence that a few of the gangs have developed an internal gang structure. Some have printed and distributed membership applications, collected dues, established rules and regulations, and conducted meetings with formal minutes. The application for the American Front Skinhead gang implies that if a member betrays the organization, the punishment is "death by crucifixion." Some of the gangs have established phone hot lines, post office boxes, and their own publications intended to recruit new members.

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Trauma-san on January 17, 2002, 06:45:34 PM
I Knew Of Some KKK Members Here In Charlotte, NC Too, So Your List Is Partial.  Those Are Some Crazy People, Most Of 'Em Are Pretty Stupid, Though.  I'm White, And They Were Always Cool To Me (Not Like I Hung Out With 'Em, I Mean When They Saw Me In The Neighborhood).  We Had These 2 BIGGGG Suckas Try To Recruit My Dad Once, He Told 'Em He Wasn't Interested, And They Were Real Cool About It, Helped Us Move Into Our House And Everything.  Ain't That Crazy?  One Of The Leader-Dudes Puts A Big Red Cross Up In His Yard Every Christmas, That's Some Scary Sh*t, I Don't Live In That Neighborhood Anymore, Though.  There Was A Black Woman Up The Street, Those Fruits Burnt Her Yard Up, Set The Grass On Fire One Night.  

Peace~
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: DreSnoop00 on January 17, 2002, 07:36:34 PM
damn my realnameis
thats a lot of fuckin info lol,, i read about the first two paragraphs then scrolled down and it was too long
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: West Coast Veteran on January 17, 2002, 09:12:09 PM
Quote
The Eastside Longos--a Hispanic gang in Long Beach, California--has been involved in a gang war since October 1989 with the Tiny Rascal Gangsters--a Cambodian gang also located in Long Beach and in several other parts of the state including Fresno and San Diego. Drive-by shootings and assaults between these two gangs have resulted in 16 killings thus far.


Yo my cousins are reppin' TRG but they from the Pomona set. I got a picture of me chillin' with them. I actually posted the picture on here when there was a picture thread.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 17, 2002, 09:35:13 PM
hmmm, didnt see nuthin bout filipino gangz in Cali. shit in SD they real thick. n in LA they are too. its funny how when i talk tah homiez frum tha eastcoast, they cant picture asian n filipino gangz, when....in suthern kali itz pretty known that theyre now tha most vicious gangs. i dont think people understand how long tha reach stetchez of sum of these gangz. i mean, 18th street has connectionz not only in suthern cali....but as far as Mexico City. As well as with sum filipino gangz that have connectionz all tha way in tha Philippines.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: infinite59 on January 17, 2002, 09:42:45 PM
Myrealnameis... Props homie
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 18, 2002, 12:05:24 AM
If i'm not wrong,the rap group Boo ya T.r.i.b.e. are involved in some heavy gang shit,they are samoan,right?
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 18, 2002, 12:13:10 AM
Quote
If i'm not wrong,the rap group Boo ya T.r.i.b.e. are involved in some heavy gang shit,they are samoan,right?


yup they samoan. samoan gangz aint no joke neitha. they bang fah real. North County San Diego gotta grip of em. Oceanside. N them muthafuckaz is jus TOO big lol. i aint fightin em....ill shoot they big ass! lol
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 18, 2002, 12:28:20 AM
"People from Los Angeles"

Below is a list of people that have in some way been connected to issues pertaining to gangs, juvenile delinquency, and intervention strategies in Los Angeles. The list below is not comprehensive, but as I research more information I will make it available.

Stacey Augmon, NBA Forward

Art Blajos, Writer

David Blake, aka DJ Quick, Rap Artist and Producer

Calvin Broadus, aka Snoop Dog, Rap Artist

Mike Christianson, Professional Bodybuilder

Mike Concepcion, CEO, Record Executive

Charles Jordon, NFL Wide Receiver

Marion "Suge" Knight, CEO Deathrow Records

Manuel Lares, Barrios Unidos

Edward Rodarte, Councilman and former mayor of La Puente

Luis Rodriguez, Author and Poet

T. Rogers, CEO Sidewalk University

Henry Tillman, Ex-Heavy Weight Boxer

Danny Trejo, Actor

Barry White, Award Winning Singing

Eric "Eazy E" Wright, CEO Ruthless Records

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 18, 2002, 12:32:10 AM
Below is a table of all gang-related homicides that occurred in Los Angeles foreach year from 1979 to 1998. These figures are tabulted by the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department and include all gang-related homicides of all racial groups for the entire county of Los Angeles.

Year     Homicides
1979      276
1980      355
1981      292
1982      205
1983      216
1984      212
1985      271
1986      328
1987      387
1988      452
1989      554
1990      690
1991      771
1992      803
1993      720
1994      782
1995      807
1996      614
1997      450
1998      399




Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Crenshaw_blvd on January 18, 2002, 12:36:06 AM
"Homicide Rate Up 27.6% for Year in L.A."

Violence: Central and south areas are the hardest hit. Many of the killers are thought to be gang members.

Los Angeles saw an alarming 27.6% upturn in homicides last year, with more than 75% of them occurring in south and central communities, authorities said Tuesday.
    A total of 545 people were slain, according to the Los Angles Police Department's year-end crime statistics. And violent crime in aggregate was up 10% citywide.
    "These statistics should be a real cause for concern for the mayor, the City Council, the city attorney, everyone in the city," said Erwin Chemerinsky, a professor of law at USC.
    "But it is important that we resist the temptation to find a single cause; undoubtedly, this is a product of many factors," he said. "They may include an increase in gang warfare, demographic shifts causing a rise in the number of males of a certain age group, low police morale and less effective policing."
    The year's homicide victims were almost exclusively black or Latino males between 17 and 32, and most of the killers--many of them believed to be gang members, were between 14 and 24.
    Several LAPD officials cited drug sales, high-powered weapons, and a decline in the number of youth programs in poverty-stricken pockets of the city as additional possible explanations, as well as attrition within the department. There are now 9,200 sworn officers, about 800 fewer than there were three years ago.
    The department has begun to analyze the year-end totals to develop strategies this year and to increase enforcement of existing laws, such as curfews.
    "The department and the chief plan to do everything possible to curb this climb," said a spokesman, Officer Jason Lee.
    The 77th Division, which had one of the highest murder rates in the city, is reassigning many of its 400 officers to street patrols.
    Some of the division's narcotics officers have been redeployed, Sgt. Kiyong Ma said. "The bike unit here was canceled 2-3 weeks ago," he said, "and those officers were put in cars."
    The division is examining every patrol officer's arrest records, citations and court appearances in search of patterns that might reflect a less aggressive approach by some officers.
    If an officer is found lacking in certain crucial areas, "we will approach each one individually to find out what's going on," Ma said. "Then, the problem will be addressed."
    Citywide, rape increased 11.5%; aggravated assault 10% and robbery 8.8%,
    Less serious crimes increased as well. Motor vehicle theft and burglary each increased 13%, Lee said.
    But Sgt. John Pasquariello pointed out that crime--gang-related homicides in particular--remain significantly lower than they were in the early 1990s, when gang warfare fueled by turf killings and drugs escalated to unprecedented levels.
    Between 1991 and 1993, there were more than 3,000 homicides, he said. After that, the homicide rate crept downward, until now.
    Pasquariello suggested that the recent spikes in crimes across the board reflect a cyclical pattern of violence. The crime rate, he said, had decreased for so long that it was only a matter of time before it hit bottom and started to climb.
    "What goes down, must go up; what goes up, must go up," he said. "But that's just one theory."
   


Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: bez on January 18, 2002, 07:17:24 AM
I was only messin bout the tit  thing.  But dam if you typed all of that you da man.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: doggmastah on January 18, 2002, 07:37:18 AM
:o Damn man, shit is really goin' down on 18th street! I did'nt knew that was that serious... Next time i visit USA ... i'll be mo' carefull... Peace !
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Instant_Killa on January 19, 2002, 09:19:57 PM
SHIT thats tight info....i think L.A. needs more police officers.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: Trauma-san on January 22, 2002, 07:20:04 PM
this actually supports my theory that the world is getting better than it was in the early 90's, check those homicide numbers.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: maxi-padz on January 22, 2002, 10:56:58 PM
are these just street gangs.. caus i saw u mention vice lords a lot.. and i know for a fact they aint no stupid ass street gang... if u thinken that vice lords is a gang bangen representing crew then ya dead wrong...

~1~
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 23, 2002, 12:28:01 AM
Quote
are these just street gangs.. caus i saw u mention vice lords a lot.. and i know for a fact they aint no stupid ass street gang... if u thinken that vice lords is a gang bangen representing crew then ya dead wrong...

~1~


vice lordz are a gang maxi. theyre actually tha south n midwest equivilent of bloodz, jus on a smaller scale really. cus anywhere u see vice lordz or disciplez...u also see bloodz n cripz. but out here in kali, vice lordz n disciplez dont exist. except for SMALL transplantz frum other partz of tha cuntry. but nuthin that anyone payz any mind to really...
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: maxi-padz on January 23, 2002, 12:30:39 AM
no tone ya wrong ive been close friends with an ex vice lord, he was the righest ranking official..
they are a business organisation... ya'll should do ya homework mo plus they mainly started in chi town if i remember
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 23, 2002, 12:42:57 AM
Quote
no tone ya wrong ive been close friends with an ex vice lord, he was the righest ranking official..
they are a business organisation... ya'll should do ya homework mo plus they mainly started in chi town if i remember


lol they did start in Chicago (midwest). Maxi, come visit me in tha states homie. i gotta homegurl in Chi-Town who used tah get down wit summa these muthafuckaz. believe me, they tha same shit as bloodz n cripz, vice lordz n GDz. therez OGz n BGz in every type of gang. when we call them gangz, it dont mean a lil krew who jus run tha street, n THAS it. in major gangz, therez ALWAYZ a bizness side. jus like bloodz n cripz. a modern day mafia basically since alot have ties to different typez of Mafia whetha it be asian mafia, mexican drug cartelz or whateva.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: maxi-padz on January 23, 2002, 12:51:50 AM
foo my homie used to live in chi-town
now he runs his own record company in dallas

he was an ex outlaw blood then he was a vice lord
foo trust me dont make me give this guy the link caus he gon make u look stupid lol hes done it before with sum guy was claimen vice lords sayenhes a dope slanger n shit...

Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: NEW_MINORITY on January 23, 2002, 04:01:41 PM
yo VICE LORDS IS a gang you dumb fool lol they represent the 5 point star like latin kings..and their color is red like bloods and i think their leaders name was "laury or something like that..but i do know that vicelords and bloods AREN'T the exact same....a lot of people think they are family but they ain't oh yeah GD and vicelord are BIG rivals like the crips and bloods
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: HBKid_Jr on January 23, 2002, 04:52:45 PM
Quote
this actually supports my theory that the world is getting better than it was in the early 90's, check those homicide numbers.

i heard tha reason homicides are down are b/c of all tha baby boomers gettin older
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 24, 2002, 01:51:17 AM
Quote
yo VICE LORDS IS a gang you dumb fool lol they represent the 5 point star like latin kings..and their color is red like bloods and i think their leaders name was "laury or something like that..but i do know that vicelords and bloods AREN'T the exact same....a lot of people think they are family but they ain't oh yeah GD and vicelord are BIG rivals like the crips and bloods


thank u. n yah, they aint related. they both represent tha red. jus like cripz n GDz do blue. but they not related. if a muthafucka came out hea tah kali claimin vice lordz....that wouldnt mean shit tah nobody out hea. hed get shot by bloodz or cripz alike. dont matta. Vice Lordz n GDz are basically a midwest version of bloodz n cripz, even tho they aint connected they took sum of tha same aspectz of blood n crip bangin to use out there. n like i said, bein frum kali i aint laced up that much on vice lordz n disciplez...but i believe tha star is for tha GDz, not tha vice lordz. but who givez a fuck really lol. fuck both of em...thiz kali up in hea. aint no vice lord OR disciple pumpin any fear...shiit...lol
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: NEW_MINORITY on January 24, 2002, 09:15:43 AM
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thank u. n yah, they aint related. they both represent tha red. jus like cripz n GDz do blue. but they not related. if a muthafucka came out hea tah kali claimin vice lordz....that wouldnt mean shit tah nobody out hea. hed get shot by bloodz or cripz alike. dont matta. Vice Lordz n GDz are basically a midwest version of bloodz n cripz, even tho they aint connected they took sum of tha same aspectz of blood n crip bangin to use out there. n like i said, bein frum kali i aint laced up that much on vice lordz n disciplez...but i believe tha star is for tha GDz, not tha vice lordz. but who givez a fuck really lol. fuck both of em...thiz kali up in hea. aint no vice lord OR disciple pumpin any fear...shiit...lol


yo vicelords ARE stars too its just that vicelords go with the "5" point star and GD'z go with "6" point star
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: klord on January 24, 2002, 06:10:55 PM
what the fuck is up all yo azz's dumb ass niglets des days.. VL ain't no gang fool GD Folk ain't no gang fool. if you know yo hoe ass knowledges you kno fa sho iz a nation. DIFFERENCE lies in the word NATION and the word GANG
gangs are pussy lil small mutha fuckaz who get caught and labeled.

rememba that fools

originally from that 510 oak killa kali most you white boys needa learn yo shit son, just cuz we run unda da 5 don't mean we all gangstaz son fucka gang kid des niggaz ridin' 5 up almight allah ain't no gangstaz we roll on small niglets like you smake all yall who dun know knowledge wit my glove son we don't represent shit fool, KNOW YOUR KNOWLEDGE and the word REPRESENT son our colorz is red, n black n gold, don't mean we REPRESENT it dumb fucks a gang consists of lil kids throwin' round dey blocks and bullshit and wut not keep yo shit on da left son keep yo shit on da left niggaz gon feel when dat cresent moon rizes sky high above my 21 brickz son shut the fuck up if you don't know shit claimin yall got some knowledge, dis ain't no real west coast connection most yall from germany and shit 15 year olds listenin' ta 2pac statin' u gangstaz false flaggin' lil biatch azz kids bet all of yall dun know shit bout a STAR dumb ass fool 5 points of a star and we'll knock yo trickz where des fleas belong
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 24, 2002, 09:33:36 PM
LOLOLOL whateva playboy. whateva u CLAIM tah BANG. it dont matta. If it make u feel betta pahtna tah call yoself a muthafuckin nation, u do dat. itz all gangsta, whetha u a blood, whetha u a crip, whetha u a GD, whetha uz a muthafuckin vice lord homie. dont try n make shit bigger then it iz. a GANG aint a GROUP of lil kidz runnin round throwin signz n thas it. if u think thas how shit really goez down, then u one confuzed muthafucka. n if u THINK u, or any "nation" would roll on any "Gang" out hea...u dun lost yo damn mind. when a Vice Lord come tah suthern kali...n beg fah a pass sayin they not in a gang...they part of tha "nation". a muthafucka will shoot em in tha head n tell em "fuck u AND yur muthafuckin GANG". cmon now, be real about shit.
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: maxi-padz on January 25, 2002, 01:16:23 AM
what he is basically trying to say foo is dont speak on matters so strongly when really u know nothing.. did u even know vice lords ran under tha 5 star or whaeva they call it?? dont try to be a big shot thinking u know everything about gangs n mafia n shit... caus u aint know everything.. i prolly know mo bout vl than u man.. but anyway klord will beback to school ya arse sum more u can count on that..
haha

~1~
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 25, 2002, 11:34:16 AM
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what he is basically trying to say foo is dont speak on matters so strongly when really u know nothing.. did u even know vice lords ran under tha 5 star or whaeva they call it?? dont try to be a big shot thinking u know everything about gangs n mafia n shit... caus u aint know everything.. i prolly know mo bout vl than u man.. but anyway klord will beback to school ya arse sum more u can count on that..
haha

~1~


yur lil boyfriend aint schoolin nobody maxi. lol. he jus tryna make muhafuckaz believe he wadnt in a gang. that he was involved in sumthin bigga. LOL aiight...yah...u righ. he was jus part of a business organization. like microsoft kinda huh? lol. wtf eva. im thru with this false bullshit lol. peace...
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: DarkM@GICI@N on January 28, 2002, 10:54:52 PM
the most dangerous gang in U.S.A?

I would have to say the police....trust me on this one
Title: Re: The most dangerous gangs in U.S.A.
Post by: ToNe1904 on January 29, 2002, 05:31:14 AM
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the most dangerous gang in U.S.A?

I would have to say the police....trust me on this one


lol real shit Spawn. u right on time wit that. cus they play tha game AND make tha rulez, witta license tah fukin kill. wtf...