Author Topic: Black KKK  (Read 327 times)

J @ M @ L

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1630
  • Karma: -115
Black KKK
« on: February 25, 2007, 05:30:33 PM »
Time to Stop Looking Past Black KKK
Denial Only Empowers Negative Forces in Community
By JASON WHITLOCK
AOL
Sports Commentary

Could you imagine the level of denial had my column not been written?
We would still be running around pretending that NBA All-Star Weekend was some sort of glorious black holiday, and anyone who dared mention the nasty elements of what transpired in Vegas would be shouted down as a racist.

Denial is a problem's No. 1 enabler.

We have a problem in the black community, and it didn't make its debut at All-Star Weekend Vegas. What was impossible to ignore in Vegas was on display in Houston, Atlanta and previous All-Star locations.

With the exception of Louis Farrakhan's 1995 Million Man March, it's been on display nearly every time we've gathered in large groups to socialize in the past 15 or so years.

The Black Ku Klux Klan shows up in full force and does its best to ruin our good time. Instead of wearing white robes and white hoods, the new KKK has now taken to wearing white Ts and calling themselves gangsta rappers, gangbangers and posse members.

Just like the White KKK of the 1940s and '50s, we fear them, keep our eyes lowered, shut our mouths and pray they don't bother us.

Our fear makes them stronger. Our silence empowers them. Our lack of courage lets them define who we are. Our excuse-making for their behavior increases their influence and enables them to recruit more freely.

We sing their racist songs, gleefully call ourselves the N-word, hype their celebrity and get upset when white people whisper concerns about our sanity.

And whenever someone publicly states that the Black KKK is terrorizing black people, black neighborhoods, black social events and glorifying a negative, self-destructive lifestyle, we deny and blame the Man.

I don't want to do it anymore.

This must be the way Rosa Parks felt on that bus. She was just tired of eating white racist (spit). I'm tired of eating black racist (spit).

I'd like to kick it with my friends without worrying about the Black KKK opening fire in the parking lot. I'm tired of reading the about the drive-bys (modern-day lynchings). It gets old waking up and hearing about the Darrent Williamses, the Tupac Shakurs getting cut down in a hail of gunfire.

I'm tired of the lack of respect, the random violence, the celebration of drug dealers and the insinuation that education is anti-black.

Wednesday I received a troubling e-mail from a fan, someone who writes me frequently. She was upset by my All-Star Weekend column.

"Why are you hating so much these days and why do you sound so bitter," she wrote. "As I always say to you, you are my favorite. I am always looking for your articles, but lately you are just hating. I still love you though!"

The whole All-Star Weekend just put me on edge; it left me in a sour mood. I can't deny what I saw.

When I arrived at the Vegas airport Tuesday afternoon, All-Star Weekend gave me one final kick in the stomach, and I'm not talking about the long lines at the Southwest baggage check-in.

I stood in line for 75 minutes in the Southwest A boarding group. I was fourth in line behind three elderly white people (ages 60 to 75). They beat me in line by three or four minutes. The A, B and C groups were all filled an hour before the flight's scheduled departure.

Twenty feet away from where we all waited in line, a middle-aged black woman (45 to 55), what appeared to be her two sons (22 to 30) and an elderly black man (60s) all sat together and randomly slept, ate and talked.

When it was time to board the flight, the group of four stood, approached the elderly white woman standing in front of me and told her, "We're second in line. That's my bag on the floor."

The elderly white people were obviously intimidated. I wasn't and told the group they were crazy, and they needed to head to the back of the A boarding group and get in line behind all the people who stood for an hour.

Of course, they disagreed. I walked over and told the Southwest boarding agent to fix the problem. He witnessed the whole thing and came over and told the group they needed to move to the back of the A group. Words were exchanged between the agent and the group.

Eventually, and I'm not making this up, one of the young men told the agent that this was racism and they were being to asked to move because they were black. The other young man said that people like me were the reason black people couldn't get ahead.

The rest of the story is boring. I bring the story up to illustrate the mindset that has infected some of us in the black community.

Rosa Parks is a hero because she got tired of white people feeling a sense of entitlement to a seat on a bus wherever they wanted it. They didn't have to respect us. It didn't matter if we were there first and were just as tired. They took what they wanted from us and dared us to do anything about it.

Forty years after Parks' bravery, why would any of us think to heap this kind of disrespect on anyone else?

Why would we fight the white KKK and forty years later embrace the black KKK?
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

LOL @ this fudgepacker
 

boycriedwolf619

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1758
  • Karma: 163
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2007, 10:29:11 PM »
Are you Black? Just curious and I do agree but to label as them Black KKK i dont know.
 

J @ M @ L

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1630
  • Karma: -115
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2007, 10:57:48 PM »
No, I'm not black... I didn't label them black KKK... the guy who wrote that article did (he's black)... I just found the article interesting... he makes a lot of good points.
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

LOL @ this fudgepacker
 

boycriedwolf619

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1758
  • Karma: 163
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2007, 11:16:42 PM »
No, I'm not black... I didn't label them black KKK... the guy who wrote that article did (he's black)... I just found the article interesting... he makes a lot of good points.
O coo nice article
 

*Z* - The Queen of Dubcc

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 864
  • Karma: 470
  • "u gotta give respect to get respect"
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2007, 12:55:36 PM »
this article is really interesting....and the story at the airport illustrates pretty well how some people dont understand what the main problem about racism is. i truely dont understand how people dont see that racism cant be fought by racism, but is something disgusting overall.
"I grew up on the chill-side, the no-big-deal-side, staying alive was no problem"
[J-Live]

 

Samoan Enforcer

  • Guest
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2007, 08:20:19 PM »
jml is a very perceptive individual  :cow:
 

J @ M @ L

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1630
  • Karma: -115
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2007, 08:42:22 PM »
jml is a very perceptive individual  :cow:

Your throat & ass still hurting? lol @ this wigger getting raped by a buncha negros
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

LOL @ this fudgepacker
 

Narrator

  • Guest
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2007, 03:00:47 AM »
Fuck this Uncle Tom-ass nigga.
 

Samoan Enforcer

  • Guest
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2007, 03:23:36 AM »
jml is a very perceptive individual  :cow:

Your throat & ass still hurting? lol @ this wigger getting raped by a buncha negros

stalking=ban


this guy wants me to be gay with him and has been harassing me, seer could you please do something about it?


I've had to state "no homo" around him yet on several occasions he tries to interpret my speech as gay sex lingo and gets overly excited.
It's become a sick world we live in these days.
 

es-jay

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3827
  • Karma: 405
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2007, 07:43:01 AM »
good article,

Fuck this Uncle Tom-ass nigga.

shuttup, its people like you who cause this segregation, doesn't matter about the colour of your skin... we're all people...
 

boycriedwolf619

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1758
  • Karma: 163
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2007, 11:27:56 AM »
Fuck this Uncle Tom-ass nigga.
Need to remove the word 'nigga' from your vocabulary.
 

J @ M @ L

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1630
  • Karma: -115
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2007, 11:56:20 AM »
jml is a very perceptive individual  :cow:

Your throat & ass still hurting? lol @ this wigger getting raped by a buncha negros

stalking=ban


this guy wants me to be gay with him and has been harassing me, seer could you please do something about it?


I've had to state "no homo" around him yet on several occasions he tries to interpret my speech as gay sex lingo and gets overly excited.
It's become a sick world we live in these days.

first
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

and now u got ur feelings hurt on top of that.. lol @ you
you pasty pussy, you cry over everything don't you... first it's all that whining about your karma, and now because you're getting clowned a little bit... take it easy (literally, or else your throat and ass will hurt some more)
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

LOL @ this fudgepacker
 

Elevz

  • Guest
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2007, 04:21:23 PM »
To be really fair, the author seems a bit off by simply blaming rap music for this. It seems to have become a property of the entire culture to simply cry about all injustice they suffer from...
 

J @ M @ L

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1630
  • Karma: -115
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2007, 06:19:02 PM »
To be really fair, the author seems a bit off by simply blaming rap music for this. It seems to have become a property of the entire culture to simply cry about all injustice they suffer from...

I don't think he simply blamed rap music.
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

LOL @ this fudgepacker
 

*Z* - The Queen of Dubcc

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 864
  • Karma: 470
  • "u gotta give respect to get respect"
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2007, 04:28:34 AM »
i didnt even notice he tried to blame rap music
"I grew up on the chill-side, the no-big-deal-side, staying alive was no problem"
[J-Live]

 

Elevz

  • Guest
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2007, 04:58:54 AM »
To be really fair, the author seems a bit off by simply blaming rap music for this. It seems to have become a property of the entire culture to simply cry about all injustice they suffer from...

I don't think he simply blamed rap music.

Well, to me, it looks like it. And I quote:

The Black Ku Klux Klan shows up in full force and does its best to ruin our good time. Instead of wearing white robes and white hoods, the new KKK has now taken to wearing white Ts and calling themselves gangsta rappers, gangbangers and posse members.

Just like the White KKK of the 1940s and '50s, we fear them, keep our eyes lowered, shut our mouths and pray they don't bother us.

Our fear makes them stronger. Our silence empowers them. Our lack of courage lets them define who we are. Our excuse-making for their behavior increases their influence and enables them to recruit more freely.

We sing their racist songs, gleefully call ourselves the N-word, hype their celebrity and get upset when white people whisper concerns about our sanity.

And whenever someone publicly states that the Black KKK is terrorizing black people, black neighborhoods, black social events and glorifying a negative, self-destructive lifestyle, we deny and blame the Man.

I don't want to do it anymore.
 

J @ M @ L

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1630
  • Karma: -115
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2007, 12:54:41 PM »
"gangsta rappers"  and  "racist songs"

That's what he mentions, but not even exclusively... he just kinda threw them in a list of examples... that can't be considered him "simply blaming rap music"... in that case, that would've been a more significant/major point of his article, which it obviously wasn't. You know what I mean?
my throat hurts, its hard to swallow, and my body feels like i got a serious ass beating.

LOL @ this fudgepacker
 

*Z* - The Queen of Dubcc

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 864
  • Karma: 470
  • "u gotta give respect to get respect"
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2007, 01:03:15 PM »
To be really fair, the author seems a bit off by simply blaming rap music for this. It seems to have become a property of the entire culture to simply cry about all injustice they suffer from...

I don't think he simply blamed rap music.

Well, to me, it looks like it. And I quote:

The Black Ku Klux Klan shows up in full force and does its best to ruin our good time. Instead of wearing white robes and white hoods, the new KKK has now taken to wearing white Ts and calling themselves gangsta rappers, gangbangers and posse members.

Just like the White KKK of the 1940s and '50s, we fear them, keep our eyes lowered, shut our mouths and pray they don't bother us.

Our fear makes them stronger. Our silence empowers them. Our lack of courage lets them define who we are. Our excuse-making for their behavior increases their influence and enables them to recruit more freely.

We sing their racist songs, gleefully call ourselves the N-word, hype their celebrity and get upset when white people whisper concerns about our sanity.

And whenever someone publicly states that the Black KKK is terrorizing black people, black neighborhoods, black social events and glorifying a negative, self-destructive lifestyle, we deny and blame the Man.

I don't want to do it anymore.

well this is true, there are racist rap songs, check out dead prez for example, it definitely contributes to a certain extent, thats why he mentions it, but he didnt blame rap music overall in this article.
"I grew up on the chill-side, the no-big-deal-side, staying alive was no problem"
[J-Live]

 

Elevz

  • Guest
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2007, 03:42:14 PM »
"gangsta rappers"  and  "racist songs"

That's what he mentions, but not even exclusively... he just kinda threw them in a list of examples... that can't be considered him "simply blaming rap music"... in that case, that would've been a more significant/major point of his article, which it obviously wasn't. You know what I mean?

Yeah, I see what you mean there. Perhaps the formulation I chose was a bit off, but basically that's what it comes down to:

The Black Ku Klux Klan shows up in full force and does its best to ruin our good time. Instead of wearing white robes and white hoods, the new KKK has now taken to wearing white Ts and calling themselves gangsta rappers, gangbangers and posse members.

In the article, the author is actually talking about a cultural development: random young blacks crying out against what they experience as injustice.
But how imposing is the influence 'gangbangers and posse members' have on the view points of a whole culture? That's minimum. The author has a good reason to simplify the causes of this behavior, because gangstarappers are actually influential, whereas 'gangbangers and posse members' purely exercise local 'terrorism'. Their influence isn't even comparable. And the author really does simplify the causes, as he does go on about gangstarap, while leaving the gangbangers and posse members behind:

We sing their racist songs, gleefully call ourselves the N-word, hype their celebrity and get upset when white people whisper concerns about our sanity.

And whenever someone publicly states that the Black KKK is terrorizing black people, black neighborhoods, black social events and glorifying a negative, self-destructive lifestyle, we deny and blame the Man.

And is he right? I don't even know - but I do sense some truth in his words. The way the icons of young black people use their influential powers is usually far from role model-esque. Yet they are viewed that way.
 

eS El Duque

  • Moderator
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5158
  • Karma: 35
  • SuperTight
Re: Black KKK
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2007, 04:55:31 PM »
great read. thanks.
DUBCC FANTASY BASEBALL CHAMPION 2008