Author Topic: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*  (Read 10965 times)

The Predator

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #200 on: October 01, 2008, 01:18:51 AM »
The worlds most dangerous thread.
 

dexter

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Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #202 on: October 03, 2008, 01:36:59 AM »
The worlds most dangerous thread.
:-X

?

anyway;
Quote
VH1 Premieres the Rock Doc ‘NWA: The World’s Most Dangerous Group’ October 3 at 11pm
http://ruthlessfamily.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/vh1-premieres-the-rock-doc-nwa-the-worlds-most-dangerous-group-october-3-at-11pm/


NEW YORK, Sept 23, 2008 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — The 90-Minute Rock Doc Includes New Interviews With Original NWA Members - Ice Cube and DJ Yella
N.W.A’s Influence Explored on New Capitol/Priority Release, ‘N.W.A And Their Family Tree,’ to be Released September 30
The Year was 1988, the album was “Straight Outta Compton,” the group was NWA and the outcome was history making. VH1’s Emmy Award-winning franchise takes a look back at the album and the group that changed the face of hip hop 20 years after its release in the new VH1 Rock Doc, NWA: The World’s Most Dangerous Group.” The doc will premiere on VH1, October 3 at 11pm*.
When NWA released their “Straight Outta Compton” album in late 1988 it changed the face of hip hop forever by ushering in a new genre of music called “gangsta rap.” Television and radio were afraid to touch it because the lyrics were so perverse and forbidden, the politicians were quick to attack and condemn it and the FBI wanted it banned - it made history even before it became a multi-platinum selling album.
VH1’s Rock Doc “NWA: The World’s Most Dangerous Group” tells the story of a group of childhood friends from Compton who channeled the rage of the streets through the prism of rap music and pop culture. Eazy-E, Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, MC Ren and DJ Yella gave a powerful voice to the late-80’s Compton ghetto that was on the verge of exploding, and in the process scared much of White America. Often misunderstood, NWA’s raging raps about police violence, gang-land terror and drug-fueled shooting sprees gave the ultimate voice to the voiceless.
The doc features new interviews with Ice Cube, DJ Yella, Eazy-E’s widow Tomica Woods-Wright, former manager Jerry Heller, Ice-T, journalist Cheo Coker, and director John Singleton. Supplemented by rarely-seen footage and interviews from the group’s early days, photos, and music, the documentary will show how gangsta rap was born in late 80s Los Angeles, a city torn by drugs and violence…and how a nation grew to fear the music that emerged.
“NWA: The World’s Most Dangerous Group” was written and directed by Mark Ford. Executive produced by Mark Ford and Kevin Lopez and produced by Wesley Jones for Creature Films. Brad Abramson, Shelly Tatro and Jeff Olde are executive producers for VH1. Mark Anstendig is supervising producer for VH1.
To commemorate the historic and ongoing musical and cultural influence of N.W.A, Capitol/Priority will release N.W.A And Their Family Tree on September 30. The new CD and digital collection features a cross-section of 18 genre-defining tracks by the pioneering gangsta rap group and its founders, plus Mack 10, Westside Connection, Snoop Dogg, and other N.W.A-inspired artists.
“NWA: The World’s Most Dangerous Group” is the newest film in the Emmy Award winning VH1 Rock Doc franchise. VH1 Rock Docs are television’s premier collection of music documentaries. Each high-end feature-length documentary reveals an untold story in the history of rock and hip-hop music, combining never-before-seen footage with a unique and unconventional narrative approach. The documentaries tell some of the most unique stories of artists and music from a wide range of genres, styles, and musical perspectives.
VH1 connects viewers to the music, artists and pop culture that matter to them most with TV series, specials, live events, exclusive online content and public affairs initiatives. VH1 is available in 95 million households in the U.S. VH1 also has an array of digital channels and services including VH1Classic, VH1 Soul, VH1 Mobile, VH1Games and extensive broadband video on VH1.com. Connect with VH1 at VH1.com.
*All Times ET/PT
 

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #203 on: October 03, 2008, 02:52:04 AM »
thanks for the reminder, i almost forgot lol

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #204 on: October 03, 2008, 10:12:29 AM »
NEW Naughty By Nature interview (50 cent,Suge,Eazy and other things..)

DX: I’m glad you mentioned that. You guys did one of my favorite Eazy-E records in “Only If You Want It.”
Besides Ice Cube working with The Bomb Squad, bi-coastal collaborations were rare in those days. How did that happen?

Vin Rock: Right! We hooked up with Eazy
I guess “O.P.P.” had come out, and Eazy was just goin’ through that stuff with [Dr.] Dre and them, so he kinda reached out to us to work with him.
We got the tail-end of what was going on.
We knew there was a transition. Eazy told us about Suge [Knight] and the Death Row situation.
He was like, “They came and kinda tried to strong-arm me, but I know the core and the basis of where this guy is comin’ from, and in the end, it won’t pan out.”
I remember Eazy to this day, ‘cause he came to my house. We were both into properties.
He showed me his properties in L.A.; we showed him our properties out here in Jersey.
Even, right now, I still live in the same house that Eazy came to visit. When I think back about Eazy,
I’m like, “God, this guy was right here in this house!”
He definitely was a marketing genius. Even I picked his brain about merchandising.
At N.W.A. they had all that merchandising and the pull-out sleeves.
Eazy, how are you doing that?” Basically, he was using a licensing company. I took it a step further.
Shit, we were already printing stuff and we’re selling it off the block.
We have the inventory and don’t need those guys, we just got Tommy Boy [Records] to let us put the inserts in the album cover.
Eazy definitely put us up on game.


For rest of the interview;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=196241.msg1995922#msg1995922
 

es-jay

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #205 on: October 03, 2008, 11:05:30 AM »
i gotta do a lil bit of scanning later...
 

es-jay

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #206 on: October 04, 2008, 05:33:52 AM »
just a few covers scanned from "The Book of Hip Hop Cover Art"


Surgery
The World Class Wreckin' Cru
Kru-cut Records   1985


Juice
The World Class Wreckin' Cru
Kru-cut Records   1985


Slice
Yella
Kru-cut Records   1985


NWA EP
NWA
Ruthless Records   1987

Cover Detail:
N.W.A. ROLL CALL ● EASY E from THE BOYZ 'N' THE HOOD ● DR. DRE from THE WORLD CLASS WRECKIN' CRU ● ARABIAN PRINCE from BOBBY JIMMY AND THE CRITTERS ● ICE CUBE from C.I.A.


Quote
Arabian Prince: The actual, first ever N.W.A. album was just called N.W.A. There was no posse. There were just four or five songs, so you’d probably consider it an EP as opposed to an album. It had the same cover, with everybody in an alley. On the back, it was just two pictures of the four of us – me, Dr. Dre, Ice Cube and Eazy-E.



Radio
Eazy-E
Priority   1988


Gangsta Gangsta (12" Maxi-Single)
NWA
Priority   1988

Cover Detail:
Gangsta Gangsta  ●  Quiet On The Set  ●  Something 2 Dance 2  ●  Something Like That


« Last Edit: October 04, 2008, 05:38:50 AM by es-jay »
 

dexter

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #207 on: October 05, 2008, 11:06:16 AM »
Dr. Dre & Eazy-E's Pool Party taken from the Niggaz4Life Home video. Censored Version
<a href="http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/e/16711680/wshhf1r3BRQ3N6Xnrb0k" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/e/16711680/wshhf1r3BRQ3N6Xnrb0k</a>
http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/video.php?v=wshhf1r3BRQ3N6Xnrb0k
If video loads slow, press the pause button and wait 1 -2 minutes for it to fully load and press the play button again




Niggaz4Life Home video
Quote
http://www.answers.com/topic/n-w-a-efil4zaggin-the-only-home-video

Genre: Nature
Movie Type: Biography, Vocal Music
Themes: Musician's Life
Director: Mark Gerard
Release Year: 1992
Country: US
Run Time: 60 minutes

Plot
One would be hard pressed to name a rap group who courted controversy more openly (and with greater success) than N.W.A.
From the open challenge of their name to their confrontational lyrics and the incendiary impact of their best-known song,
"F--- the Police," N.W.A. pulled no punches and made no apologies.
N.W.A.: The Only Home Video is an hour-long look at life with N.W.A.,
originally released right after their final album, Efil4zaggin, which features uncensored versions of three of the group's music videos,
"Appetite for Destruction," "Alwayz Into Somethin'," and "Approach to Danger." In addition,
this video features exclusive interviews with the members of the group,
footage of N.W.A. performing live on-stage, and an uncensored look at the
definitive gangsta rappers enjoying themselves at uninhibited pajama parties and pool parties. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide

Cast
N.W.A
Credit
Mark Gerard - Director; Eric "Easy-E" Wright - Executive Producer
great
 

Chad Vader

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Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #209 on: October 27, 2008, 02:58:47 PM »
Here is another new MC Ren interview for y'all to check out!
http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/features/id.1253

Quote
MC Ren: RenIncarnated October 26th, 2008 | Author: Omar Burgess
http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/features/id.1253

As much as they are deservedly praised for their roles in creating a completely different genre of Hip Hop, the members of N.W.A. have by and large stayed in the spotlight by reinventing themselves. After his death in 1995, Eazy-E posthumously looms larger than he ever did while alive. Ice Cube [click to read] can still spit classic verses, but he’s also remade himself as an A-list actor, producer and director. After releasing two classic albums, Dr. Dre sits atop the Aftermath Empire with Eminem and 50 Cent [click to read] as his multi-platinum pupils. Hell, even DJ Yella pads his bank account by directing and producing porn. So what ever happened to MC Ren? Aside from a few stellar but sporadic guest appearances, “The Villain in Black” has maintained a relatively low profile over the last decade.

A conversation with Ren yields talk of picking his kids up from school, visiting the pyramids at Giza and fond memories of his N.W.A. days. Is this the end? Hardly. Before “The Doctor” and the “Don Mega” left N.W.A. to pursue solo success, it was Ren who cornered the market on reinvention. He received his own platinum plaques for Kizz My Black Azz and Shock of the Hour. The latter saw him trade his N.W.A. persona for an equally fiery and introspective one after converting to Islam.

Now, removed from the spotlight, Ren is up to his old tricks. He’s got his own movie plans, and he continues to embrace the contemporary artists who catch his ear. Furthermore, Ren now operates on both sides of the mic as an emcee and a producer. Not that any of this should come as a surprise. After all, Ren already did the reinvention thing back in the '90s. This is RenIncarnation.

HipHopDX: Everyone’s got their own N.W.A. stories. When I was in elementary school, my mom busted in on me listening to “Dopeman” and gave me the worst beatdown ever. Do you get a lot of those stories?
MC Ren: Yeah, man. I get a lot of the same type of shit. It’s just like how when I was little, we used to sneak and go listen to Richard Pryor. We used to get in some serious trouble for that shit [laughs].

DX: Good to know we were carrying on the tradition.
MC Ren: Yeah, man. Those tapes kept us coming back.

DX: You weren’t too far removed from those times when you started rhyming, and there were a lot of other groups from Compton putting out music when N.W.A. formed. Did you ever do anything with Mixmaster Spade, Toddy Tee, or Rodney O and Joe Cooley?
MC Ren: Nah, it was N.W.A. from the start. Before everything tripped off, [Eazy]-E signed me as a solo artist. This was around the time he first put out “Boyz N the Hood” [click to read] independently. From that point on, he just snatched me up and put me in the group. Every since the beginning, it was N.W.A.—not knowing that shit was going to get as big as it did. Like you said, there were a lot of people out. So the chances of us just blowing up the way we did…that shit was unbelievable, even to this day.

DX: Given that, how far did you think it would go when you guys were signed to Macola and selling tapes out of the trunk?
MC Ren: When E put out “Boyz N the Hood,” Macola was who we took it to first. Even though we ended up dealing with bigger companies later on down the line, that shit was big to me. It was like walking into Def Jam or any other major label. We used to go up there every damn day. So I’m seeing these people in the music business that I think are really big. I was pumped up, and I really thought we were on our way. But looking back at it, it wasn’t until we got with Priority Records that things really got big. That’s where I was like, “Okay, this is it right here.”

DX: I read an old interview, where DJ Yella said Eazy-E was notorious for forgetting the lyrics to some of his songs. As the author of “Eazy Duz It,” [click to read] “Radio” [click to read] and “Ruthless Villain” [click to read], is that true?
MC Ren: Nah. Most of the time he had the words right in front of him, so he’d never go in the booth and try to do the songs from memory. He’d just go in there with his paper and bust the lyrics. If somebody wrote him a rhyme, we’d just give him the paper. He’d go in there, and we’d coach him on how to say that shit.

DX: After N.W.A. became a household name, the FBI stepped to you guys with a letter regarding “Fuck the Police.” You guys got them back on “100 Miles and Runnin’,” [click to read] but what was your initial response to seeing the letter?
MC Ren: Shit, we was happy! It was free publicity for us, and we weren’t even trippin’ off that letter. It was the record company and the [executives] who were scared. A letter? That was nothing.

I was watching [N.W.A.: The World’s Most Dangerous Group], and Cube was talking about that letter. He was like, “Man, we’ve dealt with all kinds of shit, and y’all tripping off a letter? It’s not like the letter has a mouth. The letter can’t jump up and just shoot up everybody in the room.” He said it just right, because that’s exactly how we all felt.

DX: True. Since we’re talking “100 Miles and Runnin’,”what made you sample The Warriors. You know the breakdown where the chick starts talking, and then she goes into Martha & The Vandellas just like in the movie?
MC Ren: Yeah, Dre put that in there. He used to do all the fill-ins. Actually they had somebody come in there and say that part. It sounds like the clip from the movie, but they had somebody come in.

DX: So, just out of curiosity, are you a fan of the movie?
MC Ren: Hell yeah, I love The Warriors. I remember being little and watching it back in the day when that shit first came out. That shit is hard. I’ve got the DVD somewhere around here. Everybody likes that movie. It’s classic, and that shit is comedy.

DX: Niggaz4Life would be the last N.W.A. album, and afterward we heard a lot from Dre and Ice Cube about Jerry Heller skimming money off the top. As someone who stayed with Ruthless, did you experience that too?
MC Ren: Everybody there had experiences with that shit. A lot of people had problems with it, and a lot of people had problems with Jerry. When it was just us from the group together out on the road or something, we’d voice our opinion. We’d ask, “Why is he getting paid this amount and we’re not?” That’s where a lot of that tension and all that other shit came in. It all started over that.

We felt he didn’t deserve what he was getting. We deserved that shit. We were the ones making the records, traveling in vans and driving all around the place. You do all those fucking shows trying to get known, and then you come home to a fucking apartment. Then you go to his house, and this motherfucker lives in a mansion. There’s gold leaf trimmings all in the bathroom and all kinds of other shit. You’re thinking, “Man, fuck that.”

Everybody knows what happened. A lot of times you see Jerry talking about that shit, and he’s acting like George Bush or [John] McCain—like nothing wrong happened. He’ll say some shit like, “Everything was alright. They got what they deserved.” And I’m like, “Man, c’mon.” We were supposed to get super paid off of the first album, as big as it was and as many copies as it sold. But we didn’t really know the ins and outs of the business side, and certain people did. Those were the ones who took advantage of everybody.

DX: Cube and Dre were both on bad terms with Eazy before he was diagnosed with AIDS. Did you and he get to talk before he passed?
MC Ren: Yeah, we did. It was a time when we weren’t even talking. Everybody was doing their own thing. I remember he called me, and he was telling me about this and that. Then he started talking about getting N.W.A. back together. I was like, “Yeah.” Then he asked me to get on his album, and that was the last one he did, Str8 Off the Streets of Muthaphuckin’ Compton. I agreed, and we hooked up at his house. Me, him and Yella did [“Tha Muthafuckin Real”] [click to read]. We were all talking, and he was talking about everybody hooking up to do the N.W.A. thing. Right after we did that song, that was the last time I saw him. I heard he was in the hospital about a week or two later, and then that was it.

DX: Considering all the drama that went down, why stay with Ruthless after that?
MC Ren: It was a lot of shit going on, but after he passed, I had a lot of meetings with everyone who was about to take over. At the time, that’s where I wanted to stay. I had been there so long, and I didn’t want to go somewhere else and have the label put me in the mix with their other artists. They told me I could still do whatever I wanted to do. At that time, a lot of labels weren’t doing that. They’d bring people in to try to change your image and all that. Ruthless was like, “Shit, just do you.” So I just kept putting my shit out.

DX: There was a lot of young talent on the label then. You had Bone Thugs-N-Harmony [click to read], Black Eyed Peas, Kokane and Baby S. Were they all looking up to you as the OG?
MC Ren: When Bone was recording, I wasn’t really around for a lot of the studio sessions. I would be off doing some other shit. A little after that, I was on tour with Bone. We kicked it, and I got a chance to meet a lot of them dudes. It was cool, and it’s nothing but love to this day.

DX: Did you ever see the potential in any of those acts to become as big as they eventually did?
MC Ren: I really saw it in Bone. When Eric was still alive, he had other artists. But he was putting his everything into Bone, and they were really tight. He was so pumped up over Bone. They did exactly what he thought they were gonna do, but he didn’t get to see it. They really blew up, man. So, yeah, back then I definitely saw the potential in Bone.

DX: I want to get into your solo work for a minute. Around 1993, you dropped Shock of the Hour, which was different from anything you had done as a soloist or a member of NWA. What was your frame of mind going into that album?
MC Ren: Man, Shock of the Hour was just me coming into Islam. I had a lot of new ideas, and I had a big perspective on life. I looked at everything different. When you listen to that album, I recorded the first half right when I was thinking about falling into the Nation of Islam. Then the whole second half is songs I made after I fell in. I was like, “Okay, let me go.”

But I didn’t want to make the whole album like that, so I said, “Shit, I’m keeping everything I did.” I let everybody hear what I did on the first part, and then the second part allows you vibe to what I was doing at the time.

DX: Yeah, you definitely get the sense of growth and the impact of your conversion as the album progresses. A few years later, you converted to Orthodox Islam right?
MC Ren: Right.

DX: This is a little off topic, but a few weeks ago, we asked a few emcees to speak on the passing of Imam W.D. Muhammad. What was your initial reaction?
MC Ren: Man, I was shocked. I didn’t even know, but my wife saw it on the Internet. I was just like, “Damn. I ain’t seen nothing on the news or anywhere else.”

DX: Exactly.
MC Ren: They didn’t show him one time. You feel what I’m saying? Nobody talked about it, and it didn’t even make the news. They show so much bullshit on the news, and you’d think his passing would’ve at least been on there. We’re talking about Elijah Muhammad’s son Wallace. Come on, this is Warith Deen. But that’s how the media is. Everyone acts like they’re scared.

DX: I just had to sneak that in there. We couldn’t get anybody to weigh in on it that week.
MC Ren: Well you’ve got me.

DX: No doubt. Getting back to the music, the next album, Ruthless for Life, featured 8Ball & MJG [click to read] on “Who in the Fuck." How did you guys make that happen?
MC Ren: They had this song I heard back in the day called “Space Age Pimpin’” [click to read]. I was out of town when I heard it, and I remember thinking, “Damn, this shit is hard. These niggas is tight.” I listened to that song all day over and over and over. I remember seeing their video when they first came out, but I can’t remember the name of the song. After I heard that “Space Age Pimpin,’” I was like, “Man, I gotta work with these fools.”

So I got on the phone, and I told Ruthless to get in contact with Suave House [Records] so I could fuck with ‘Ball & G. They hooked it up, and I went down to Houston, ‘cause that’s where Suave House was at the time. We hooked up with the homie T-Mixx, who did the track for “Space Age Pimpin’.” We all just got together and knocked that shit out, and it came out cool as fuck.

DX: It’s interesting that you guys got together, because a lot of artists in your position think they’re too big to do those types of records.
MC Ren: Yeah, some people trip like that, but I don’t. If like you, I’m gonna try to work together. I don’t usually work with a lot of motherfuckers. But if I like you, I’m gonna work with you.

DX: After almost disappearing for a while, you resurfaced in 2001 with “Hello,” “Chin Check” and cameos on both Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre’s albums. During that time did you entertain thoughts of a major come back.
MC Ren: Yeah, I did. At that time I got a few offers for an album. Motherfuckers were coming out getting all this money. People were coming out with a little buzz, but they’d still walk into the label and get a million bucks for their advance. I was like, “I was signed to motherfuckers for so long. And if I’m gonna fuck with your label, you’re gonna have to break me off, cuzz.”

Back in the day, it was kind of cool. You could get the lower advance and end up keeping more money on the back end. But if you take less and they don’t push your album correctly, you just walk away from that motherfucker with less. And you end up in the red on top of that. Next thing you know they’re telling you, “Oh we had to buy this, this and that. Your album flopped.”

So around 2000, maybe 2001, I decided a motherfucker would have to break me off at least a million up front. That way, just in case they fucked my shit up, I still would get $1 million out of it. The game has changed to the point where if a major label isn’t willing to break me off, then I can just do the shit myself.

DX: These days, Dre is promoting a line of headphones and different types of liquor, and we all know Ice Cube is doing films on the side. Yella is directing pornos. What is MC Ren up to outside the realm of Hip Hop?
MC Ren: Outside of music, I have a radio show that’s starting on the 29th of this month. It’ll be on 92.5 KYHY, and people can catch that at www.925burbank.com. I’m doing radio, and I’ve got some other shit in the works. The company I’m working with told me don’t speak on it right now, so I gotta keep my mouth shut. As soon as it happens though, I’ll let you know, dog. It’s gonna be big.

DX: I also read somewhere that you were into Ancient Egypt and Kimetic culture.
MC Ren: Yeah, man. I went out there in 1995 on a study group with Ashwa Kwesi. That shit just blew my mind, so I’m all into that. They were making shit perfectly thousands of years ago, and they can’t even recreate some of it today. That is straight up mind-boggling.

DX: Absolutely. You guys were doing something very similar in terms of Hip Hop and you ended up being associated with the terms “gangster” and “gangster rap.” Since the definition has gotten twisted over the years, what do you define as gangster?
MC Ren: Well, we never called it gangster rap. They just threw that shit on us. We used to just say our shit was hardcore or underground. Today, it’s so garbage. Gangster rap—that shit don’t even sound right. It sounds like some made up, garbage shit. And you’ve got a lot of niggas running around talking about they’re gangster rappers. It just sounds crazy to me, because I’m not a gangster rapper. Motherfuckers might label me that, but if they ask me, I tell them, “Man, I ain’t no gangster rapper.”

DX: Correct me if I’m wrong, but “Gangsta Gangsta” was about the only time you guys actually used the word in reference to yourselves. How did that label get associated with N.W.A.?
MC Ren: Man, it was this interview we did with this motherfucker. I think he was from the Los Angeles Times. This white dude comes to Eric’s house, and he was scared. Actually we were in Compton at Eric’s mom’s house. So he did a little interview and took some pictures of us and shit. He was so scared, man. He had nothing to be afraid of, but you could physically see him shaking. After we saw how nervous he was, Eric went in the house and got a gang of guns. Dude backed up and then tried to sit back down. But he was shaking so hard that he must’ve moved, because this fool missed the chair and fell on the grass.

When he left we were laughing like a motherfucker. Everybody was just going, “What the fuck is he scared of?” You could just see the expression on his face like, “Oh damn, I’m about to die.” I guess he got back to his office like, “These are some gangster rappers!” So he put that shit in the article, and ever since then that’s what it was.

DX: Compton has a ridiculous history, in terms of Hip Hop. After your generation there was Quik, MC Eiht, The Game [click to read] and others. What is it about Compton that produces all this good music?
MC Ren: Back then, I just believe the west was rising at that time. New York was dominating everything, and everybody I knew in Compton was just grinding. It was just great competition. Everybody out here wanted to be the best and compete with New York. I think that had a lot to do with the music. We used to be in the studio saying we wanted to outdo this person or that person. That motivated us to a point where we said, “We gotta make our shit the hardest out.” Then you’ve got them saying, “Man, we gotta outdo N.W.A.” We were getting a lot of the shine on the west coast, so they were thinking, “Man, we gotta outdo them niggas.” But, you know, it is what it is.
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #210 on: October 29, 2008, 08:46:59 PM »
Quote
Ultimate Visonary
by Allen S. Gordon Murder Dog. Vol.9 NO.1




 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #211 on: October 29, 2008, 09:55:05 PM »
who is that guy?

on fuck tha police 2 he was like "you're gonna suck me and my partner's dicks or you're going to be on dead nigger bitch"

and on "just don't bite it" he was the guy advertising 'the art of sucking dick'

he has a ton of other little talking appearances on Ruthless stuff,  but those are the two that come to mind. i was listening to ATL's LLH the other day and heard him again and decided I finally need to know.

-T


Funny thing Tanji,thanx to this board.
I brought back this book: Ego Trip's Book of rap lists (really good for research, ISBN 0-312-24298-0)


Quote
Mike "Crazy Neck" Sims
Not only does is this studio rat's fretwork appear on several Ruthless productions,but his voice can be readily indenfied portraying crooked police officers and stiff,Caucasian radio announcers on NWA's 100 Miles And Runnin' EP and Above The Law's Livin' Like Hustlers.
 

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #212 on: October 31, 2008, 11:00:42 AM »
great
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #213 on: November 08, 2008, 04:24:31 PM »
Check this video out!!
It's from the brand new MC Ren Radio Show!
and yeah also he mentions me! (Opazo)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ebhwevJcz7I&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ebhwevJcz7I&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>


^^^^nice ^^^^  ;)

More from MC Ren´s radio show;

(talking about the creation of "Fuck The Police" and a little about The D.O.C)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/N2ddJTqo-0c&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/N2ddJTqo-0c&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

(talking about Big Rocc,Concrete criminals,Obama etc.....)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KbyH-7WOh0c&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KbyH-7WOh0c&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

(talking about Rodney O & Joe Cooley,)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/TeaDE4dj8q4&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/TeaDE4dj8q4&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>


MC Ren and the staff chop it up about Obama
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/J9GGfq65VVc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/J9GGfq65VVc&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>
« Last Edit: November 25, 2008, 07:33:03 AM by Chad Vader »
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #214 on: November 12, 2008, 12:43:18 PM »
NEW MC REN ahh interview
http://www.allhiphop.com/stories/features/archive/2008/11/10/20677191.aspx

Lorenzo Patterson, better known as MC Ren, turned the rap world upside down as a member of the gangster-rap pioneering group known as N.W.A. While fellow members Eazy-E, Ice Cube and Dr. Dre had a more visible presence, the group would not have been the same without Ren’s razor sharp and rapid hard-hitting lyrics, which served as a proper one-two punch with Ice Cube’s loud yet charismatic flow on the classic Straight Outta Compton.

The group was left to fill a huge void as Ice Cube departed for a solo career and that meant a much larger load for MC Ren to carry on N.W.A’s  Efil4Zaggin. With Ren as the only true lyricist left in the group the album was forced to rely heavily on music production to make up for the lack of the one-two punch that they previously had. We all know what happened next as Dr. Dre was the next to leave over monetary concerns which gave MC Ren the opportunity to release his solo works, Kizz My Black Azz,  Shock Of The Hour, The Villain In Black and Ruthless For Life.

The solo material never lived up to the commercial success of his former group-mates; however, Ren was able to attain a very loyal fan base that still exists to this very day. After a long hiatus from the rap game, The Villain is once again ready to strike with a brand new album currently in the works. In this exclusive interview MC Ren takes us to the beginning where it all started, all of the way to his current status where he discusses his new album and his new online radio show.

 
AllHipHop.com: When were you first christened with the name MC Ren?

MC Ren: That was like in 1984. I started rhyming in ‘83 and back then I was calling myself Master Ren, like Grandmaster Flash and Grandmaster Melle Mel. That was like when I was first starting off but the next year I became MC Ren. I dropped the Master because it didn’t sound right. That’s how that all came about.

N.W.A "Straight Outta Compton" Video



AllHipHop.com: How good were your skills back in those early days?

MC Ren: I was good. I was the best in my neighborhood. I could tear your ass up freestyling off the top of the head. It was just me and this other cat in my neighborhood - and a few others that were trying to rhyme back then. I was the best to me.

AllHipHop.com: Did you have the rapid style that you are known for, back then?

MC Ren: I didn’t have that yet. That didn’t come until later down the line. At that time I was mimicking Run-DMC. It wasn’t until high school that I tried to really get it going and change it up. Then when I got with the group [N.W.A.] I developed my own little style.

AllHipHop.com: How did you go about getting in the group in the first place?

MC Ren: I was going to do a solo thing first. Eazy had the “Boyz N Tha Hood” song but it was only local at the time. I knew him and he stayed right around the corner from me. I was just amazed that someone from around my way put a record out. I went and hollered at him, he heard me rhyme and signed me to a solo deal with his label. This was before he blew up. Then it got to a point where I was writing for him and he was like, “You might as well just come on in to the group.” I just said, “Ok,” and that’s how it all came about.

    “There really was no time to stop and reflect. It was all building up like – do the record, the record comes out, do the video, get banned, the F.B.I. letter – all of that bulls**t added up and you really didn’t have the time to think about it. It went so fast! Now looking back... ‘Who would have thought?’”


AllHipHop.com: I bet you had no idea what you were getting yourself in to when you first signed up to be a part of N.W.A.

MC Ren: Naw man, really I just wanted to be known locally. I had no idea that s**t was going to do what it did. It was a shock but once we started doing it everything just happened so fast. There really was no time to stop and reflect. It was all building up like – do the record, the record comes out, do the video, get banned, the F.B.I. letter – all of that bulls**t added up and you really didn’t have the time to think about it. It went so fast! Now looking back on all of that, it’s crazy to me – It’s like, “Who would have thought?”

N.W.A "100 Miles & Runnin'" Video




AllHipHop.com: Cube didn’t have a contract when he left to go solo. Did you not have one at the time too?

MC Ren: Nobody had a contract at that time. Nobody in the group really signed anything. It was easy for Cube to leave because of that reason. He was smart and boned out. I could have held out too but we just looked at s**t differently – and it turned out how it did.

AllHipHop.com: Do you think that you could have left and had the same solo impact that Ice Cube did?

MC Ren: I don’t know. He’s had so much success – he’s really doing it. I don’t know what kind of success I would have had. I don’t know how big my records would have been – but I would have still done me no matter what.

AllHipHop.com: Did you really have a personal beef with Ice Cube? Or was it manufactured for marketing purposes?

MC Ren: It was real but it was no big ass beef or anything—like people think that it was. We were mad at him and he was mad at us but it was just verbal. No violence occurred. Whatever was said, it was just on records. After that all of us just cooled down. We are all always going to be connected; we are damn near like brothers for life even if we don’t see each other or whatever. Back then, it was just verbal beef. We were mad because he left the group and he was mad back at us. I see a lot of specials and documentaries that talk about it. They say that we dissed him on 100 Miles and Runnin’ – but there wasn’t any kind of big diss on it. We were young and people were telling us that he was saying this about us and then people were telling him the same about us. We were young and s**t happened. We can’t go back and change it but we are older now and we are men now, we know that s**t was just petty. We are all cool.

MC Ren "Final Frontier" Video




AllHipHop.com: Did you have any type of communication with Ice Cube during this whole verbal beef? 

MC Ren: No but when he first left the group we were still talking. He would call me because we were supposed to do a song on his Amerikkka’s Most Wanted album. We were supposed to do a song but s**t got so bad that it didn’t happen.

AllHipHop.com: Do you think that Ruthless Records would have actually let you appear on his album?

MC Ren: [Pauses] I don’t know man. Now that I look back at it, I doubt it. It was before we started going back and forth with all of that little bulls**t but looking back now from a record companies perspective, I don’t think Ruthless would have let that happen.

AllHipHop.com: At this point were you now officially under contract?

MC Ren: Yes, when he left everybody signed. They rushed to make that happen. The company didn’t want that s**t to happen again.

AllHipHop.com: Did you have any of Ice Cube’s same concerns about money?

MC Ren: Yes we all did but when Cube left, we thought that we could still negotiate this s**t and get what we want. It wasn’t like the rest of us were just going to walk away.

AllHipHop.com: Dr. Dre also left over money issues. Did you ever want to follow him out the door?

MC Ren: When he first left, I went with him and he took me somewhere – to some record company to hear someone talk about their plans for us. It just didn’t seem right to me, so I was cool on it. I was like, “I’m straight where I am at.” I didn’t want to leave one situation that I thought wasn’t cool and go in to a similar situation. At that point I was just tired of motherf**kers trying to tug and pull on me.

    “When [Dr. Dre] told me about it, it wasn’t like, ‘Leave with [me] and come make Death Row.’ He was just like, Leave. It wasn’t about me not wanting to go to Death Row because it wasn’t even formed yet – it was just me not wanting to go through all of the bulls**t again.”


AllHipHop.com: So you had reservations about the whole Death Row Records thing?

MC Ren: When [Dr. Dre] told me about it, it wasn’t like, “Leave with [me] and come make Death Row.” He was just like, Leave. Death Row wasn’t really formed then. It wasn’t about me not wanting to go to Death Row because it wasn’t even formed yet – it was just me not wanting to go through all of the bulls**t again.

MC Ren "Mayday on the Frontline" Video




AllHipHop.com: Having no Dr. Dre beats at Ruthless must have made you concerned about the quality of music you were going to make in the future.

MC Ren: Well, I knew that when Dre left there wasn’t going to be an N.W.A anymore. Right after he left, I did my Kiss My Black Azz EP and started doing all of my solo s**t. I knew that N.W.A wasn’t going to be anymore when we left and me and Eazy E used to get into it a lot. I would tell him, “Man. The music isn’t going to be the same without Dre doing it.” Eazy wanted to bring in a lot of newer producers and I told him that s**t wasn’t going to be the same. It was bad enough that Cube was gone and now Dre was gone. Nothing was going to be the same – just a Ren and Eazy record.

AllHipHop.com: So Eazy was still pushing the idea of keeping N.W.A. alive?

MC Ren: He wanted to. But I could tell deep down when me and him used to talk about certain things that he knew it wasn’t going to be the same. He knew that.

AllHipHop.com: Did Eazy ever try to pressure you to diss Dr. Dre when they started beefing?

MC Ren: Yes, I was. Eazy used to want me to do that. At the time I would tell him, “Both of y’all are cool with me.” It was like having two brothers in the house fighting with each other and the other wanting to stay neutral because he didn’t want to get involved. I told E that I don’t want to get on one of his records and talk about Dre, the same way I wouldn’t want to get on a Dre record and talk about him. When I told him that, he said, “Yeah. You are right.”

For him to say that I was right was something else. Today’s rap stars would be like, “You aren’t riding for me?” Eazy respected me and was like, “Ok. This is between me and him then.” He came to the realization that I didn’t have anything to do with this. But they worked their s**t out. Dre went over there and made peace with him at the hospital and before Eazy passed he was telling me how he wanted to get N.W.A back together to do something.

AllHipHop.com: Do you think you guys could have convinced Cube? Or would it have just been you, Eazy, Dre and Yella?

MC Ren: I think Cube would have done it. I think he would have done it if everybody was involved.

AllHipHop.com: Before Eazy died were you and Ice Cube on good terms again?

MC Ren: Yeah. I saw Cube at that time – I can’t recall where – but I hollered at him for a quick second.

AllHipHop.com: What was that conversation like?

MC Ren: I don’t even remember to tell you the truth. But the situation wasn’t ever like, “Let’s squash this s**t.” After we got older, it was just squashed without us even talking about it. Just like when I was on the Up In Smoke Tour with Cube – we were rollin’ on the bus together state to state and we never even talked about all of that old stuff. We probably joked about it once but that was it.

MC Ren "Same Old  S**t" Video




AllHipHop.com: That’s pretty cool especially since rappers tend to hold grudges after embarrassing stuff is said about them on records.

MC Ren: All of the fools that used to battle on records back in the day – are all cool with each other today. It’s only a problem when motherf**kers start threatening each other with guns and talk about their family and what they will do to their kids and all of that stupid stuff. Motherf**kers get killed talking all of that type of s**t.

AllHipHop.com: You released your solo works but they never lived up to the success that Ice Cube and Dr. Dre had with their solo works. Are you disappointed by that?

MC Ren: As long as the people that love me bought them, that’s all that I care about. There are motherf**kers out there today that will still play those albums. As long as they are playing them, that’s cool with me.

AllHipHop.com: I was so happy to see you, Cube and Dre come together for a song or two but I really wanted to see a full-scale reunion. Why couldn’t you guys pull it off?

MC Ren: I don’t know. That is a really good question. I couldn’t even tell you. We were supposed to do something when we went on tour in 2000 or 2001. We were supposed to record out on the road but it was so hectic and motherf**kers get tired so it never just materialized. 

AllHipHop.com: There weren’t any disagreements that prevented anything?

MC Ren: Naw, it wasn’t like that. Everybody was cool, but it just never happened.

AllHipHop.com: So after that failed to happen, what happened to you? Fans haven’t heard much from you in a long while.

MC Ren: After that, I was on a few people’s albums doing a 16 here or a 16 there. Then I just laid back. I just fell back and started living my family life.

    “I’ve been doing this since 1983. All of the record company bulls**t – I was just tired of it. After you do something for so long, you just want a break. I didn’t want to do s**t with music... Recently I just got that bug again and started writing.”


AllHipHop.com: You lost your interest in rap?

MC Ren: Yeah man. I’ve been doing this since 1983. All of the record company bulls**t – I was just tired of it. After you do something for so long, you just want a break. That’s what I did. I broke and took a break. I didn’t want to do s**t with music. I’m cool with the family and all of that. It was chill. I did some reading, chilled with the family – just regular s**t.   Recently I just got that bug again and started writing.

MC Ren "Ruthless for Life" Video




AllHipHop.com: You didn’t participate in VH1’s Rock Doc of N.W.A. Why is that?

MC Ren: They called me at the last minute to drive way the f**k out there to do it and I was like, “S**t! You can’t call me at the last minute to do it.” So I didn’t do it.

AllHipHop.com: How are you today with Dr. Dre? You have plans to be on Detox?

MC Ren: Not right now. I haven’t talked to him in a long a** time. I’m sure that sh*t is going to be tight but people ask me if I am going to be on it and I tell them no.

AllHipHop.com: Do you ever see yourself doing anything again with your former bandmates?

MC Ren: [pauses] I don’t know man. It’s whatever. Right now I just don’t know. If something comes up, I’m sure that they will get at me.

AllHipHop.com: When did the writing bug bite you again?

MC Ren: A few months ago. I just wanted to get back in it for my fans that love me and love the s**t that I do. What I do is for them so I’m putting this album together called RenIncarnated. I’m going to put it out on the Internet for them.

AllHipHop.com: You aren’t going to release this through a label?

MC Ren: No. F**k them! F**k those labels. The only way I’ll deal with a label is if they break me hella off and I have the space to do what I do. But all of that politicking and ass kissing? Naw, I ain’t f**king with them or that.

AllHipHop.com: You must really have some really bad past experiences with the record companies. 

MC Ren: I have so many of them. I could write a book about all of my experiences.

AllHipHop.com: Have you ever thought about starting your own company so you won’t have to deal with them anymore?

MC Ren: I could do that but with the Internet I don’t need a label to do any of that stuff. With the Internet it’s so easy to just put that *h*t out. F**k labels – that’s why everybody is doing their stuff on the Internet – it’s big! Why f**k with these bulls**t labels when you can do it yourself and cut all of them out? Those labels just want to take and take and take. F**k that!

AllHipHop.com: It’s often said today to rappers who have been around since the 80’s or 90’s that they don’t have their skills anymore. How do you feel about that in regards to yourself?

MC Ren: I feel like this man, anybody that comes out and I don’t give a f**k who it is. You come out and put out slammin’ ass albums like Public Enemy did with It Takes A Nations of Millions – which was their best album ever but after that one the albums are cool but you can’t top that s**t. It’s like The Beatles. They came out big in the 60’s but their solo work in the 70’s could never match it. It was big but it wasn’t on the Beatle-mania type of s**t. People can’t expect that you are just going to stay like that your whole career. Michael Jordan can probably still get out there and ball but he isn’t going to be dunkin’ on motherf**kers anymore. He did all of that. It is what it is – people are going to love you or they are not. But I’ve still got my skills – I know I’ve still got my skills. My skills are harder than most of these n****s in the game! A lot of people don’t really have skills – only a few. I still can put some s**t together.

Ice Cube f/ Dr. Dre & MC Ren "Hello" Video




AllHipHop.com: Do you keep up with today’s rap music?

MC Ren: Yeah, I check it out. And you know Cube still has skills! He might not be the young Cube but he’s the older Cube and he’s still got skills. There’s a lot in today’s game that can’t f**k with him even now!

AllHipHop.com: When is the RenIncarnated album coming out?

MC Ren: Next year. It’s going to be the sh*t. I’ve got two songs on my MySpace – go check them out. There are two cuts leaked until the album comes out. I’m just focused on this sh*t right now.

AllHipHop.com: Is it all Ren? Or will there be guests?

MC Ren: All me. I’m doing the music too – me and my homeboy Apocalypse. It’s mainly me doing the music though.

AllHipHop.com: When did MC Ren become a producer?

MC Ren: Man, I’ve been doing beats for a long time – people don’t know! Back when I put CPO the Boss Hogg’s album that was produced by me. I did all of that music. I’ve been doing beats since back then but I wasn’t trying to be out there shopping beats. I just focused on writing. But yeah – I’ve been doing that s**t man. When we first started N.W.A I got some equipment and I would ask Dr. Dre about this and that and he showed me how to work the SP-1200, 808, and all of that s**t we used to have back in the day. I’ve been doing it off and on. I’m back into it heavy right now just putting my album together.

AllHipHop.com: What’s next for you after the RenIncarnated album? Do you have any other plans?

MC Ren: Musically I will probably do some other stuff but right now I am just focused on that album. I also have a new radio show on 92.5 Burbank – the MC Ren Radio Show [www.925thewhy.com]. It’s going to be a tight show every Wednesday night at 7 PM Pacific Time. I’m going to play classic Old School Hip-Hop – the kind of music that I grew up to. I’ll play some new stuff but I won’t play a lot of s**t that you hear on mainstream FM radio. If I play some new s**t it will be some underground stuff that you aren’t hearing or just some tight s**t. It won’t be anything like what you hear on mainstream radio. You will be hearing a lot of classics from Run-DMC, our N.W.A stuff, MC Shan and so on.

AllHipHop.com: Since you bring up the classics. Who is MC Ren’s all time favorite?

MC Ren: All time? That’s hard. But my tops are Run-DMC, Melle Mel, Ice-T, Chuck D, KRS-One and Ice Cube.

AllHipHop.com: Which influenced you the most growing up?

MC Ren: When I was young I used to listen to Run-DMC a lot. I used to like DMC’s voice. Growing up I thought that his voice was hard as hell – he had the hardest motherf**king voice ever.

AllHipHop.com: What do you miss about Hip-Hop that you don’t think you see much of today?

MC Ren: Originality. Growing up rappers had their own look, their own style, and you couldn’t bite anybody. If you did then you were wack and got dissed. Nowadays, everybody looks the same and sounds the same. Biting is allowed now. I miss originality. Back in our day, you had us and our sound. Then you had Slick Rick with the patch and gold chains. You also had Big Daddy Kane and Public Enemy – everybody was different even Hammer. Everybody is the same now and they talk about the same things.

AllHipHop.com: Ren is there anything you want to leave the readers of AllHipHop.com with?

MC Ren: I just want to say for you all to look out for the RenIncarnated album. Check out my MySpace which is www.myspace.com/mcrenofficialmyspace. Check out my radio show every Wednesday night. 
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #215 on: November 21, 2008, 12:36:57 AM »
Mc Ren - The Shock Of the Hour
(Ruthless Records 1993)

1.11:55 The intro is ripped out of the cult classic 'The warriors' flick the scene where big gang boss 'Sirus' is addressing the crowd chanting 'can you dig iiiiiiiiiiiiit?' Dubbed over by Laywiys monstrous vocals and a furnacing beat by Tootie. 10/10

2. Same Old Shit - Sllick Ricks 'borrowed' vocals get a gangsta dopeness remake, a dope dropping beat and dope flowing from Mc 'muthafuckin' Ren with some other dope sounds layered on to give it an extra sharp cut throat edge. 10/10

3. Fuck What Ya Heard The theme of this album is very dark musically and lyricaly. A kinda Dark G-Funk vibe haunts the album. Ren sounds moody and pissed off here. 8/10

4. All Bullshit Aside - Fucking bad ass track. Got the darkest vibe of the efil4zaggin lp, Dr Jam and madness4real produce a a up-tempo hardcore gem, Ren anihilates the track with out lord giving mercy. Bad ass. 10/10

Grab another bitch twist the panties off the top
Open up my mouth and let the old english drop
Buzz for a minute - could'nt walk a straight line
But that shit don't stop Ren from writin' a rhyme


5. One False Move - The dark shadow keeps on creepin. Don Jagwarr (cube's wicked) supplies the ragga fueled chorus. Dollar Bill and Da Konvicted felon both come with thier own dope styles of flowing with the Villian on laser red dot point. Ren has some of his own performances on efil4zaggin jacked n pasted here. 10/10

6. You Wanna Fuck Her - Ren puts nasty slutty sleaze bag hos on blast in a real horrible way. The picture he paints of these scum bags isnt pretty like say a nice bitch like vida with pretty lipstick lips n dope curves. Instead he describes Crab infested spunk buckets. Nasty diseased hos. Well you wanna Fuck her? you wanna Fuck her?...Dark G-Funk. 8/10

7.Mayday On The Frontline - Theres two mixes to this song one is the single/video release one on the cb4 soundtrack. Both are dope but the album one is the G-Funk version yep a dark G-Funk version. Black balaclava Nigga with Attitude in full attack mode slaying racist cross burning white sheet wearing Crackers in his path. I like the way that cool whiteboy whos down with the mexican gang from American Me has one of his lines from the movie used through out the track. 10/10

8. Attack On Babylon - A prophetic Ren calls for the destruction of babylon and asks doomsday to bring it to niggaz. Rhythm D is on the drum,drum,drum... on a very eerie sounding production 8/10

9. Do You Believe - You can feel the direct NOI influence as Louis Farrakhan lines from a speech are used for the chorus and the basis of the song. Ren brings the shock lyrics directly to the front lines. He devours the slave master style crackers and the slave mentality coon niggaz. The hate can be felt from the speakers. Tootie laces a chilled but menacing beat. 10/10

10 Mr Fuck up - (feat Juvenile'rens brother' and the Whole Click) Straight up west coast flowing. Nice rhymes, nice beat with sampling James Browns 'pay back' and lifts Ice Cubes Gangsta gangsta lines. 10/10

11.Shock Of the Hour - (feat Kam/Laywiy) Laywiw returns with that authorative monstor voice of his with a prophetic rage, Another westcoast Rebel aka Kam drops in kickin it hard. A Solid slamming groovy beat with deafning screams blended in to the background giving it that spooky feel. 10/10

In the twinklin' of an eye, motherfuckers gonna die
Watchin' baby bomber planes rip across the sky
Fallin' on your Jesus, comin' for the pork chop
Wake ya out your sleep, shit is deep, about to wreck shop
Bombs goin' down a mile deep, pushin' up a mile high
Nigga ain't allowed to cry while they disbelieve his God
Fakin' with your Malcolm X picture on the wall
Motherfuckers shoulda listened when you got your final call
Think your doin' the brothers a favor by buyin' a paper
Shoulda read your paper, it tells ya  the devil raped ya
Stripped ya of the scripture, blood ya then he crypt ya
Gave you a corner, some bitches, and called you that nigga
And then he pimped ya
You're mind is a waste, so now you got a taste
The chastise bitch ya shoulda took heed of what the wise said
Now you're bent outta shape with no power
Fuck up and waited for the shock of the hour
MC Ren

Overall 9.5/10

To me this is Rens best joint. Dark, brutal, unforgiving with classic production from a classic era of west coast history. With all the sunny pop bubble gum radio rap of today im glad Ren laced us an album for the night. I see this and Snoops doggystyle together back in the day and picked them both up but most peeps only picked up Doggystyle well it was thier loss. The 200,000 or was it 400,000? of those that purchased this album were either loving it or hating it and the haters were proably in shock.

   



MC Ren reviews
« Last Edit: November 25, 2008, 05:46:19 AM by Chad Vader »
 

jpeezus

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #216 on: November 21, 2008, 12:38:37 AM »
THE RAP GAME IS A POLITICAL MACHINE THAT WE DAMN NEAR KILL OURSELF TO BE APART OF. PEOPLE WHO OFTEN DICTATE WHAT IS HOT AND WHATS NOT HAVE NO IDEA WHAT THE HIP HOP and RAP LISTENERS ARE FEELING BECAUSE MOST OF THE LABEL EXECS DON'T EVEN LISTEN TO RAP!!! ITS A SHAME!!

WITH THE UPCOMING RELEASE OF HIS NEW ALBUM TITLED "LOVE ME" HITTING STORES ANY DAY NOW, J PEEZY IS MOVING TO FOREFRONT OF RAP GAME TO BRING HIS MUSIC TO THE PEOPLE. HAVING TOURED WITH ARTISTS LIKE THE SHOP BOYZ AND DJ UNK J PEEZY CAN BRING THAT REAL CHANGE THAT THE RAP GAME IS MISSING

PULL THE TRIGGA 07 Pull The Trigga.mp3 - 3.60MB
FIXN TO GET IT 12 Fixin To Get It.mp3 - 3.46MB

__________________CHECK THE LINKS OUT AND COP THAT! _______________________



www.apbent.com
www.itunes.com/jpeezy
www.rhapsody.com/jpeezy/loveme
www.myspace.com/jpeezyonmyspace
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #217 on: November 25, 2008, 05:56:22 AM »
MC Ren is back with more of his Radio show  ;)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/_iZ0I1NJMME&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/_iZ0I1NJMME&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>
 

The Predator

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #218 on: November 25, 2008, 10:09:52 AM »
My 'Shock Of The Hour' review from a couple of years ago made it on here, ha!
All that bad grammar and shit induced by whiskey and weed. Should of remixed those old reviews.


« Last Edit: November 25, 2008, 10:15:14 AM by The Predator »
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #219 on: November 25, 2008, 10:14:03 AM »
My 'Shock Of The Hour' review from a couple of years ago made it on here, ha!
All that bad grammar and shit induced by whiskey and weed, should of remixed those old reviews.


I checked online activity,and a guest was checking your review.... so I was like let me check that.
That's how it ended here  ;). If you want to write a new one,let me know  ;) I will delete your old one  ;)
 

The Predator

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #220 on: November 25, 2008, 10:23:26 AM »
Let the old one stand, it's more fun reading it like that now. Wipes the floor with the wack HHC review, lol.

I think i wrote a review on 'The Chronic' (ahem) under the same weed and whiskey circumstances ;D , might dig that up and give it a mix.
 

Dre-Day

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #221 on: November 25, 2008, 10:52:10 AM »
Let the old one stand, it's more fun reading it like that now. Wipes the floor with the wack HHC review, lol.

I think i wrote a review on 'The Chronic' (ahem) under the same weed and whiskey circumstances ;D ,
might dig that up and give it a mix.


Do that,HHC gave The Chronic 3.5/5 by the way  :P :-X :-\ :-[


lol  :loco:

Dre-Day

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #222 on: November 25, 2008, 11:39:13 AM »
Let the old one stand, it's more fun reading it like that now. Wipes the floor with the wack HHC review, lol.

I think i wrote a review on 'The Chronic' (ahem) under the same weed and whiskey circumstances ;D ,
might dig that up and give it a mix.


Do that,HHC gave The Chronic 3.5/5 by the way  :P :-X :-\ :-[


lol  :loco:


Murder Dog gave Chronic 2001 3/5  :P :-[ :-X :-\ :laugh:
I believe I posted scans of the reviews (in this thread)


yeah we discussed it before i believe.
speaking of bias  :P

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #223 on: December 05, 2008, 07:08:30 AM »

Overnight Blackman unreleased NWA track; (Hip Hop Connection December 1989 #11)

^^^^ I posted a better scan of this a couple of pages back ^^^^


^^^^^^^
It looks like there's two (at least) unreleased NWA tracks; (Ren also talks about a gang off leftovers from the Niggaz4Life sessions in his thaformula.com interview)
-One Cube & Ren track
-Overnight Blackman (Ren solo?)

^^^^
would nice if DubCNN could ask Ren and/or Cube about these next time DubCNN catch up with them.
Same with the War disc leftover (unreleased) that BobCat produced;

Yash:
What happened to that track you and Cube did with Bobcat it was suppose to be on his war album?
MC Ren:
He didn't use it he had told me last time I talked to him he was gonna put that shit on somethin change the beat make it more updated put the vocals and shit on it.
I'm sure it gone come out one day if it don't come out now somebody gone put that muthafucka out in ten years from now.


Read rest of the interview here;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=44467.msg500532#msg500532
« Last Edit: December 05, 2008, 07:25:54 AM by Chad Vader »
 

Chad Vader

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #224 on: December 05, 2008, 08:15:30 AM »

The Return Of The Superfly review Hip Hop Connection 1990


The Return Of The Superfly  OST

« Last Edit: December 05, 2008, 08:19:25 AM by Chad Vader »