Author Topic: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*  (Read 17859 times)

Larrabee

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #30 on: November 06, 2007, 01:02:24 PM »
Lately, Dre has been using more bass keyboards and less bass guitar on his beats. Mark Batson and Dawaun Parker played on the majority of his recent tracks, and I know Mike Elizondo played guitar on Buck's single.
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #31 on: November 06, 2007, 01:27:38 PM »
Lately,Dre has been using more bass keyboards and less bass guitar on his beats.
Mark Batson and Dawaun Parker played on the majority of his recent tracks,and I know Mike Elizondo played guitar on Buck's single.

True,he should bring the bass guitar back.
Dawaun Parker is cool,heīs the one that did G.R.I.T.S right? What tracks has Mark Batson worked on?
I donīt have the Young Buck (I got a burned copy),so I donīt have the booklet to read the credits.
But I read in Robert Bacon interview that was posted here that he played bass guitar on one of the tracks Dre produced.
I think the track was called "Hold on",but Iīm pretty sure Timbo can straight this one out.
 

ToOoOoN!!!

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #32 on: November 07, 2007, 11:15:49 AM »
that was a long read but a good one!! props  8)
 

Tanjential

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2007, 01:01:35 PM »
thanks for the interview scans  :) never knew dre recorded 30-35 songs for the chronic (too bad we will never be able to listen to the leftovers).
anyway, about the D.O.C. interview from "Yo!"; the D.O.C. says that he still continues to write for N.W.A. so i guess the interview is originally from 91, but it was published later?

he's talking about working on dre's first solo album though, so i guess it was supposed to be released through ruthless at first or am i wrong?
dre obviously wanted his own label, but before he left ruthless, his label was going to be distributed by ruthless records(that was the plan) if i remember correctly


if hoe hopper is any indication, we're good with the songs we got

then again the OG rat tat tat tat was dope

then again, if the og rat tat tat tat was any indication then we have heard alot of the chronic leftovers in one form or another since

-T

 
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Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2007, 01:15:30 PM »
thanks for the interview scans  :) never knew dre recorded 30-35 songs for the chronic (too bad we will never be able to listen to the leftovers).
anyway, about the D.O.C. interview from "Yo!"; the D.O.C. says that he still continues to write for N.W.A. so i guess the interview is originally from 91, but it was published later?

he's talking about working on dre's first solo album though,
so i guess it was supposed to be released through ruthless at first or am i wrong?
dre obviously wanted his own label, but before he left ruthless, his label was going to be distributed by ruthless records(that was the plan) if i remember correctly

if hoe hopper is any indication, we're good with the songs we got
then again the OG rat tat tat tat was dope
then again, if the og rat tat tat tat was any indication then we have heard alot of the chronic leftovers in one form or another since
-T

I donīt feel neither of the tracks you mentioned,
but in one of the interviews Dre mention some uptempo tracks that didnīt fit the laidback Chronic "sound".
So I assume these tracks was more of a NWA style production,Serial Killa might have been one of them.
 

Tanjential

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2007, 01:46:47 PM »
i don't like hoe hopper really but rat tat tat tat og is sick

-T

 
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Tanjential

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #36 on: November 11, 2007, 10:05:54 PM »
I don't like hoe hopper really but rat tat tat tat og is sick
-T

Trentman hooked this track up a couple of months ago,canīt find the OG thread.
Wonder whatīs the deal with this track since it got the same hook........
...and "Att Will" thanx Dre and Snoop in the booklet.
Trent scanned the booklet in the OG thread,whatīs the link Trent?
Att Will;
08 hoe hopper.wma
http://www.mediafire.com/?dn0n1yxhocv

The beat to the the Rat tat tat tat OG donīt fit the violent lyrics....

i felt that juxtaposition was what made that version brilliant

-T

 
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Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #37 on: November 11, 2007, 10:13:34 PM »
I don't like hoe hopper really but rat tat tat tat og is sick
-T

Trentman hooked this track up a couple of months ago,canīt find the OG thread.
Wonder whatīs the deal with this track since it got the same hook........
...and "Att Will" thanx Dre and Snoop in the booklet.
Trent scanned the booklet in the OG thread,whatīs the link Trent?
Att Will;
08 hoe hopper.wma
http://www.mediafire.com/?dn0n1yxhocv

The beat to the the Rat tat tat tat OG donīt fit the violent lyrics....

i felt that juxtaposition was what made that version brilliant

-T

 :laugh: as experiment maybe,super violent lyrics on some smooth shit.....
The lyrics ainīt exactly same is it?
 

Tanjential

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #38 on: November 12, 2007, 03:15:55 AM »
they're slightly different yeah

but anyway, the juxtaposition of that track illustrated how lightly the 'gangsta' takes life.

whereas the version on the album seems kind of melodramatic, though still very dope

-T

 
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Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #39 on: November 12, 2007, 04:28:57 AM »
the juxtaposition of that track illustrated how lightly the 'gangsta' takes life.
whereas the version on the album seems kind of melodramatic,though still very dope
-T

I see what you mean,never really tought of it that way before you brought it up.
The album version got a "cinematic" sound that fit perfect to the gangster fairytale lyrics.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 12:42:52 PM by Chadrick »
 

Tanjential

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #40 on: November 12, 2007, 12:40:24 PM »
the juxtaposition of that track illustrated how lightly the 'gangsta' takes life.
whereas the version on the album seems kind of melodramatic,though still very dope
-T

I see what you mean,never really tought of it that way before you brought it up.
The album version got a "cinematic" sound that fit perect to the gangster fairytale lyrics.


agreed

I wonder how many other beats on regulate were dre leftovers. we know that runnin' wit no breaks and and ya don't stop were.



-T

 
Fee Fie Foe Fum; somethin' stank and I want some.

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Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #41 on: November 12, 2007, 12:50:18 PM »
the juxtaposition of that track illustrated how lightly the 'gangsta' takes life.
whereas the version on the album seems kind of melodramatic,though still very dope
-T

I see what you mean,never really tought of it that way before you brought it up.
The album version got a "cinematic" sound that fit perect to the gangster fairytale lyrics.


agreed

I wonder how many other beats on regulate were dre leftovers.
We know that runnin' wit no breaks and and ya don't stop were.
-T

I didnīt know that  :),where did that info come from?
Another thing,I was going trough Tha Westside DVD to find interesting things to post.
Thereīs a clip of Nate Dogg in Dreīs studio singing over a beat that I donīt reconize,,,,, (the clip is from around 92-93)
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #42 on: November 14, 2007, 08:32:43 AM »
A pissed MC Ren talks about a N.W.A session that didn't go down;
Quote
MC Ren interview in Rap Pages August 1998
Rap Pages: After failing to cross paths with Cube for several years after the group’s dissolution, the two were reunited by producer Bobcat, who was working on tracks for each artist’s upcoming album. Ren and Cube discussed a reunion but where tripped up by a flat tire in the creative wheel.
         “Dre, he ain’t fuckin’ with nobody out here,” Ren says with a obvious disappointment. “He only want to fuck with New York motherfuckers right now. We all got on the phone and we talked about it. Dre was like,’yeah,yeah, we’re going to do it. We’re going to go to the studio I be fucking with’. But then, when it was time, he didn’t want to fuck with it. We were supposed to do an N.W.A track for The Players Club. We where supposed to meet at Dre’s crib. The day came,and Dre flaked on us.
          “Cube was kinda hot for a minute, like he was going to take it personal,” he continues. “We where talking like we should just do some shit ourselves. We ain’t finna beg no nigga to do no shit. I don’t know what that nigga’s trippin off of. He didn’t want to do that Players Club shit with niggas that put him out. Because if it wasn’t for niggas like us—me, Cube and niggas back in the day—he wouldn’t be where he at. Cube asked him a favor, and he couldn’t do it for that nigga, but he can turn around and do some shit with LL. It ain’t like LL made you Dr.Dre or helped get to be where you’re at. When he flaked like that, we where like, ’Fuck it, the reunion thing ain’t gonna happen.’”
         Still, Ren says he hopes it could happen one day. Snoop, who appears on Ruthless For Life’s “So Watcha Want,” was slated to occupy Eazy-E’s place in the group, though unreleased Eazy material was to be included on a number of tracks.
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #43 on: November 14, 2007, 08:55:10 AM »
An old Lady Of Rage interview,talks about tracks that didn't get released;
       Here’s a little Rage interview I found, she talks about a couple of tracks that’s unreleased and not leaked as far as I know (correct me if I’m wrong). The originally slated title for the album ‘Eargasms’ was pretty dope too. She goes in detail about the tracks in the interview.
       Tracks that she’s talks about:
-‘Introducing The Eargasm’
-‘Ride On The Eargasm’
-‘Rollin’ On The River’
-‘Late In The Midnight Hour’

Quote
Lady Of Rage interview in Hip Hop Connection 1994.
    While Rage rightfullyclaims full credit her own eyecathing hairdo, it is actually Dre 100 per cent responsible for the equally clever title to her forthcoming debut album, ‘Eargasms’.
      “When he first came up with that title I didn’t like it at all. I was like ‘Ugh, what does that mean?’,” she laughs. “But when it grew on me, after he explained how the concept fitted into the ‘Introducing The Eargasm’ and ‘Ride On The Eargasm’ tracks. It suddenly all became clear and generally the album will consist of what you’ve hears thus far – things that people can relate to. There’ll be a lotta sexual stuff because that’s a part of life I know about…. And I just look at like if more people made love while listening to music then everybody’d be a lit more relaxed. So `Eargasms` is really just a getaway. Something that’s good to the ear. When you hear it you’ll release your tensions and get it all outta your system.”
        One of the tracks that reveals a different side to Rage’s talent and personality bears the unusual title of ‘Rollin’ On The River’.
        It’s just a song I particularly like – a sexual song, but not explicit or nothing like that,” she enthuses. “It’s real discreet, real classy, and dealing with me seeing the guy from afar. I’m admiring him and thinking in my mind ‘Oh, what would I do with him?’. The ‘River’ actually signifies the bed. I think that’s a catchy title and something that people can relate to. I mean, it’s different from the Rage that everybody’s heard before. But then I am a lady and I do have the that side in me that desires a man. I’m not some rough, unaffectionate-type person.”
       One of the album’s more controversial moments will defiantly prove to be *Late In The Midnight Hour’, a song dealing openly with the ‘hush-hush’ topic of mastrubation. Rage pauses to stifle an embarrassed giggle . “Well the fact is people do it! There’s nothing wrong with it – and I fell that if somebody brings it out to the light to the light then people might deal with it more! You know, it’s like the forbidden subject, even in Hip hop which has covered all kinds of other taboos. The first coupla verses are making fun of it and are discreet towards the guys. Then  for the third verse – which isn’t even completed yet – I was gonna get into the girls and say, you know, ‘It’s alright if you do, it’s actually the safest thing right now’. So it’s like at first I’m making fun in order to break the ice, and then in the end just telling everyone, ‘If that’s what you do then that’s fine’.”


Quote

http://www.allhiphop.com/features/?ID=1161

Any man who has ever played the wall at a club can tell you there’s nothing more refreshing than an assertive woman. In the world of Rap, it’s an understatement to say it requires assertion to come of age around Suge Knight, Dr. Dre, Snoop, and Tha Dogg Pound. The Lady of Rage’s pounding lyricism on “Stranded on Death Row” only foreshadowed her praises on “Afro Puffs” two years later.

The Lady of Rage’s time came at last, in 1997, with Necessary Roughness. Though critics praised the album, the headless record company didn’t support the project – allowing the album to break a flawless label history of Gold and Platinum. In the year following, added to the murders in Rap, Rage retreated to her native, Virginia.

With acting roles in Next Friday plus other appearances, Rage stayed busy – but removed from her past. With a few guest verses, compilation work, and several AllHipHop Rumor updates, a return to Rap had been long projected. Last week, a mixtape, “VA to L.A.” was released, and AllHipHop.com quickly delivered Lady of Rage to our masses – touching on the past and the future.

AllHipHop.com: “Unfucwithable” on Doggystyle All-Stars was the last big piece of work I remember of yours. What have you been up to the last two or three years?
Lady of Rage: I’ve been up to: working on album; trying to get a deal. I’ve been working on myself – my spirit and my outlook on life.
AllHipHop.com: On your outro, you mention that industry people are not always returning your calls. How has the search for the deal been going?
Lady of Rage: With Boss Lady Entertainment [the company behind the mixtape], we really haven’t gone full steam ahead as far as actually pounding the pavement for a deal. [As far as the phone calls], I’d see certain artists or producers out and say, “Is there anything I can do for your?” and [we’d exchange numbers]. When I’d call or follow-up, it’s phony. I hate it. I hate it with a passion. I hate the runaround. After I call a person four or five times, I don’t call ‘em anymore. I hold grudges. I shouldn’t, but I take all of that stuff personally.
AllHipHop.com: Mixtapes mean different things for different artists. For you, what is the best case scenario as a result of this mixtape?
Lady of Rage: The best case scenario is that Jay-Z would hear it and want to sign me. The next best case scenario is that people will know that I’m still doin’ this, my skills haven’t dulled or anything, and I’m free agent. Whoever comes with the best offer to me will definitely not regret it.
AllHipHop.com: I think the average Hip-Hopper would see you wanting to get signed, and say “Why not Snoop? Why not Dre?” Why not?
Lady of Rage: As far as Snoop, yes – we were supposed to do business together, but things didn’t work that way. I think the distributor wasn’t sure if I was or wasn’t still signed to Death Row, and didn’t want the hassle. As far as Snoop, it’s not anything personal. As far as Dre, I would love to work with Dre – but I don’t have any contact to him. He’s a hard guy to get in touch with. I don’t think I have any burnt bridges at all. Even with Suge, I saw Suge a while ago when I was at Death Row [offices], and he knows I’m venturing on and stuff. Even if he offered me a deal, if it was right, I might go that route. I’m just trying to get the best thing. This is my second time around. My first time, I came out in the midst of turmoil as far as Suge going to jail, Dre leaving, ‘Pac getting killed – and in the midst of that, [Necessary Roughness] was released with no type of marketing or promotion.
AllHipHop.com: I’ve always been intrigued by your album. In 1997, Death Row released more albums in one year, than they have in the last seven or eight. I had heard specifically, that your project was salvaged by DJ Premier because it was old material on the cutting room floor…
Lady of Rage: That’s news to me. I didn’t know all that. I don’t know if Premier saved the project. But I know Premier, was definitely one of the artists I wanted to work with. I wasn’t allowed to work with many of the producers I wanted to. I had to work with what I had.
AllHipHop.com: How does Necessary Roughness sit with you today?
Lady of Rage: I wish it could have gotten more exposure. Those lyrics on there…I feel if that whole album was remixed, and put out right now, it’d [do well]. I feel that I’m still a dope lyricist, and as far as females are concerned, if I’m not in the Top Three, there’s something wrong, and as far as males, if I’m not in the Top Twenty, lyrically [something’s wrong]. That’s how much I believe in my music. I could be under false pretense, but I don’t think so. If everybody could’ve heard Necessary Roughness, then they’d know, “Wow, she really is a dope MC.”
AllHipHop.com: This was 1997. “Afro Puffs” was three years prior. Why was the “strike while the iron’s hot” motto not used?
Lady of Rage: When I first came to Death Row, they told me my album was going to be the next album put out after The Chronic. Then they said Snoop’s, but after Snoop’s mine. Then came Above The Rim. So, I kept getting pushed back. I don’t know if it was a male thing or not. “Afro Puffs” I believe, could’ve gone platinum as a single. Also, when I write, I don’t write like Snoop and Daz and everybody like that. I don’t feel like writing in the studio ‘cause I don’t like a lot of people around me. I like to be at home, in my room. I was slower than the rest. I really don’t know.
AllHipHop.com: The chemistry with you and Dre was so right, but so minimal. Is there unreleased material from those days?
Lady of Rage: Oh no! Like I said, when I write – I don’t do anything extra. I do what I have to do, that’s it. If I die tonight, you wouldn’t get another album from Rage.
AllHipHop.com: One of the little known moments was the b-side to “Dre Day,” called “Puffin’ on Blunts and Drankin’ Tanqueray.” This freestyle with you, Tha Dogg Pound, and Dre was classic. Tell me about that moment…
Lady of Rage: Those days were just…I don’t know if magic is the word. There was just a vibe. Dre used to make beats, and I would always walk in and say, “I don’t like that beat” – from the gate. I was always the one complainin’. But when I walked in that day, and I heard that track, I was like, “I like that!” Blunts and Tanqueray were circulating, and we just did it. I’m at a loss for words. I think I got [The Quotable] in The Source that month for that. I’ve gotten that twice. The other was, “Microphone Pon Cok.”
AllHipHop.com: A lot of artists do crazy things to get kicked off labels. It’s rumored that you did a number on Death Row’s lobby. Is there any merit to that?
Lady of Rage: [laughs] Well… I don’t know if I did a number on it. I went up there one day to pick something up. I’d been going up there all the time. Suge was locked up at the time, things were run differently. When I got to the lobby, the guy there told me I needed an appointment to go upstairs. I was like, “I need an appointment? For what?” All I got was, “Things are different now.” I was insulted by that. I’m one of the artists, one of the reasons this office is here, I feel. I didn’t sell millions of records, but I was on those things. This is mine’s like Dre’s, Snoop’s, Suge’s, whatever. I said, “Can you go get the package for me?” When he went upstairs, I picked up something and I broke some things up, and really give them a reason for not lettin’ me in here. I never went back again until I couple of months ago. I was just mad. I was pregnant, I was mad, that was slap in the face.
AllHipHop.com: What was it like on the recent visit? And why would you go back to Death Row?
Lady of Rage: I went back because my daughter’s father works up there. I didn’t go back there for business or anything. I went up there for that. Suge was in the parking lot at the time. I hadn’t seen him since he got released. We spoke to each other like, “You look nice,” and that was it. No, “What the Hell you doin’ here?” None of that. That [lobby] incident, I don’t believe Suge had anything to do with it. I told him about it. I wrote him a couple letters – told him how I was upset about different things, and I didn’t wanna be on Death Row anymore. That was it. He said that whatever I wanted to do, he was with me.   

Be sure to check her;
www.myspace.com/officialladyofrage
Robin Yvette Allen, the Lady of Rage is a rapper best known for collaborations with several Death Row Records artists, including Snoop Doggy Dogg on the seminal album Doggystyle. Chubb Rock discovered Lady of Rage when she was working and living at Chung King Studios in New York. She subsequently had an uncredited appearance as Rockin' Robin on Chubb Rock's 1991 album The One. After she appeared on They Come in All Colors (The L.A. Posse, 1991, 1991 in music), Dr. Dre heard her on the album, and Suge Knight called her and convinced her to come to Los Angeles. She then appeared on several tracks from Dr. Dre's 1992 classic The Chronic album, and on Snoop Doggy Dogg's Doggystyle in 1993. In 1994, she had a hit single with "Afro Puffs" (from the soundtrack to Above the Rim). Her debut solo album, Necessary Roughness, was released in June of 1997 (see 1997 in music). She has been a hairdresser to members of Tha Dogg Pound. After the release of her album and a guest-appearance with Gang Starr alongside Kurupt ("You Know My Steez (Three Men and a Lady Remix)") in 1998, Rage left Death Row Records and the music industry generally to focus on acting, appearing in an episode of The Kenan & Kel Show. The Lady of Rage also went on to be featured in several television sitcoms. Most notably as Coretta Cox on the WB's "Steve Harvey Show" from 1996 to 2002. She also had a small part in Next Friday as Baby D, little big sister of Day Day's ex girlfriend. In 2000, she made another rapping appearance on Snoop Dogg's "Set It Off" on his album Tha Last Meal. In the coming years, Rage would once again disappear from the public eye. Her limited recording activity consisted of 2002 with a solo track "Unfucwitable" on Snoop Dogg Presents...Doggy Style Allstars Vol. 1 and the comical "Batman & Robin", which appeared on Snoop Dogg's Paid tha Cost to Be da Bo$$-album. Rage truly returned in 2005 when she started her own label, Boss Lady Entertainment, and creating a mixtape called From VA to L.A. She has also made appearances on Welcome to tha Chuuch - Da Album and Cali Iz Active.


Blu Lacez posted some tracks from ‘Rage’ here;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=134111.125
You can order her mix-tape here;
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000AE8FOO/qid=1126447152/sr=8-2/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-6669130-2020914?v=glance&s=music&n=507846
« Last Edit: November 14, 2007, 10:15:26 AM by Chadrick »
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #44 on: November 14, 2007, 09:08:54 AM »
Suge Knight talks shit Part.1; N.W.A reunion. (HHC September 2000)
Here’s a part of a interview in Hip Hop Connection, where he talks shit as always. I took out the most interesting part’s.
Here’s part 1; N.W.A
Quote
Hip Hop Connection. September. 2000. Suge knight Cover;
HHC;
What happened to the Dre and Cube album?
Suge Knight;
“Basically egos, and when you get two guys who are not from the ghetto what can they actually talk about? Their house in the hills?
That’s why you  won’t see the N.W.A album come out any time soon. Everyone’s talking about the N.W.A reunion album coming out, but I own the name N.W.A, so before they put that out I’d have to give clearance for it. They did ‘Chin Check’ on Cube’s album which didn’t help sell the album because the kids want somebody young. What really sold Dre’s album is Eminem, that’s what sold that record”
HHC;
How come you own N.W.A’s name?
Suge Knight;
“The N.W.A thing, that’s a Compton thing. With me really being from Compton and those other guys not really being from Compton, it was more rightfully mine to own than theirs. I wasn’t part of the group but I was part of the real ghetto which those guys weren’t.”
HHC;
Are you saying N.W.A where all fakers?
Suge Knight;
Eazy lived in Compton, that’s the only one, everybody else didn’t.


Here’s a link to another thread where he talks some shit about Snoop and more.
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=132282.0
Here’s a link to another thread where he talks some shit about Ronin Ro;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=132284.0