Author Topic: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*  (Read 11230 times)

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #50 on: November 14, 2007, 12:50:34 PM »
MC Ren interview by www.thaformula.com
http://www.thaformula.com/mc_ren_memory_lane_thaformula_music.html

Quote
Q & A W/ MC Ren: a trip down memory lane
feedback: info@thaformula.com
2004

http://www.thaformula.com/mc_ren_memory_lane_thaformula_music.html


ThaFormula.com - Alright Ren, let's take it from the top. Did you go to the Roadium (a swapmeet in Gardena, California) a lot in the early days?

MC Ren - Yeah me and Eazy used to go up there. Steve Yano had his little booth up there and me and Eric used to go up to that muthafucka looking for some new shit, new records. 'Cause Dre he used to do the tapes for Steve and shit and every time Steve was sellin' the muthafuckas me and Eric would go up there every weekend, 'cause back then we was trying to be known anyway so we used to go up there just to get that little vibe. Back in the day I remember he had somebody up there airbrushing muthafuckin' T-Shirts, I remember I got me an airbrushed T-Shirt.

ThaFormula.com - What do you feel represents the L.A. Hip-Hop landmark?

MC Ren - For me the landmark of Hip-Hop L.A. was 1580 KDAY. They used to do all them shows. That's really where muthafuckas heard everything at first. KDAY was the link to all the shit. KDAY would bring all the Hip-Hop muthafuckas into town and do they little promo shows and shit with him. So it had to be KDAY 'cause you could get the East Coast shit. They played all the Uncle Jam's Army, had all the mixmasters on the weekends scratching like a muthafucka all night. Tony G, Julio G, remember that shit?

ThaFormula.com - Hell Yeah!

MC Ren - I remember they used to give shows at "The Casa" and all that shit way back in the day. I be askin' fools about "The Casa" and a lot of fools don't be remembering that shit. I saw Audio 2 at "The Casa" when they had "Top Billin'" out. Yeah, so it definitely had to be KDAY. I remember me and Eric had went up there for vinyl and shit like that, the Roadium was number one. That's where Dre used to get all his muthafuckin' records. 'Cause see when Dre used to do them tapes with Steve, what he would do was he would make Steve them tapes and Steve would pay Dre with records. That's where we got all the break records and all the break beats. When we did "Straight Outta Compton," all those records were from Steve. Dre do the tapes and he (Yano) would break Dre off with a gang of break beats.

ThaFormula.com - Do you consider yourself a lyricist or a MC?

MC Ren - Man I consider myself both really. I'm "MC" Ren and if you're a real MC you got lyrics. That's how you know niggaz been around a long time when they still got muthafuckin' "MC" on their shit. That shit is old you know what I'm saying. Niggaz today don't even be like that. How I was thinking back then coming up is different from a lot of these muthafuckas today. It's just how everybody was thinkin' back in them days is different from what muthafuckas is thinkin' today on what a MC is, what lyrics is and you could tell in how the music is. 'Cause back in the day muthafuckas had to be hard and you had to come with that mentality of "I'm an MC, I got lyrics." You can't just come in the game back in the day talkin' about anything. You had to come talkin' about some shit or muthafuckas would just call you what you are.

ThaFormula.com - Hip-Hop is very depressing right now man...

MC Ren - Man this shit is so wack right now man. It's like bitch shit now man and I hate when a muthafucka come out and it could be a wack ass muthafucka who comes out, sell some records, and then you got to hear all this niggaz wack homies! Back in the day it wasn't even like that.

ThaFormula.com - You know I'm really surprised that you're feelin' this way 'cause most artists are acting like nothing's wrong with Hip-Hop, talkin' about how dope some MC is cause they're gonna work with them now and make some dough, or just plain scared to speak on this shit...

MC Ren - I ain't scared of shit. I'll say anything. See muthafuckas be scared 'cause they be thinkin', "if I say something that might fuck me up being on T.V. or that might fuck me up being on the radio…," you know what I mean? All that bitch shit! Man you ain't on that muthafucka but so what. So what!! Fuck the Radio! 'Cause the radio, they are gonna give you some bubble gum shit anyway. Nigga if you are an artist speak your mind. That's like niggaz who be saying they are MC's but other muthafuckas write their rhymes. Nigga you ain't no MC if a muthafucka is writing your rhymes! Speak your mind and be a true MC. Back then muthafuckas didn't give a fuck. That's Hip-Hop! When you start listening to record company muthafuckas and them PR muthafuckas that just thinkin' about money saying don't say this don't do that, that's bitch shit! 'Cause I have had a gang of muthafuckas come at me with "don't say this," and "Ren we want you to do that." I'll be like "man I ain't fittin' to be doing that shit, I'm not fittin' to be puttin' my tail between my legs, scratchin' where I don't itch, doin' a little shuckin' and jivin'." Fuck all that! I'm just gonna say a lot of niggaz be scared in the game. They know niggaz be actin' like bitches, be scared to say shit about niggaz in the game cause they be like, "oh if I say this he ain't gonna do this for me or if I say this he ain't gonna rap on it." Fuck that! I remember back in the day niggaz didn't even give a fuck about having a gang of niggaz on they album. That's a MC. They would probably have about one or two muthafuckas if any on their shit, and they would just hold the whole muthafuckin' record down. Remember Run, LL, and Whodini where muthafuckas would put out a record once a year? When you had to wait a year or two just to get a new Run DMC or whatever? It's like muthafuckas today don't be thinkin' on that level.

ThaFormula.com - Hip-Hop was good when you could go to the Indoor Swap Meets and get the shit a couple of weeks before it dropped cause you knew it was gonna be dope and it was worth the extra money for the tape...

MC Ren - That was the Golden Era man. It's fucked up. I'ma tell you like this. The closest shit that muthafuckas was gonna get to that was Pac and Biggie. After they died it just went downhill really. Think about it man. Since them two niggaz died, this shit is like the wack era. There is nothin'!

ThaFormula.com - Also I notice a lot of these artists that come out after a while they got no soul left in them man. It's like they just lost it...

MC Ren - Niggaz be bitches now. They first come out, they be hard, mean muggin'. You can't squeeze a smile or nothin' out these niggaz. Now you see niggaz be on MTV smilin', being happier then a muthafucka. I'm like, what happened to this nigga? This nigga was just like this, now look at him. I hate when I see niggaz in TV like that. Nigga you was just hard as a muthafucka, now you just all happy. 'Cause muthafuckas get like that when them cameras get on them niggaz. Every time smilin' and doing stupid shit thinkin' they cute and shit. Man come on dog, that shit is ridiculous man.

ThaFormula.com - Now you were the one that never did many interviews back then. So I wanted to know from your mouth how you and Eazy got started in this?

MC Ren - That nigga Eric, he was like my brother's homeboy. He used to live right around the corner from a nigga. He used to be the little nigga in the neighborhood doin' his thang. He knew I could rhyme and shit so he was trying to leave that shit alone and get into music and Dre was down with the Wrecking Cru and Dre spit at him like, "yo you can start your own label, we can do this." So Cube came in and he was under Dre at the time 'cause he was in a group called C.I.A.

ThaFormula.com - Did you know Cube at that time?

MC Ren - Nah, I didn't meet Cube 'till I came in the group really. I used to do street tapes and he used to do street tapes and used to bump his street tapes before I met him. I was with that nigga one day and we was sittin' in the car waiting for Eric to come home on his mama's street and I was like "nigga check this tape out, this nigga is harder then a muthafucka." Him and Dre and them back in the day used to make tapes and they would take shit like "My Adidas" and make it "My Rubber" and make it funny. I remember I was in the car with that nigga in my bucket and I was like nigga listen to this shit. We were two little niggaz straight out of high school. I was like "nigga this muthafucka hard right here." He was like, "nigga that's me." I told him man I been listening to your shit for like a year. So me and that nigga clicked after that..

ThaFormula.com - So what were you doing at the time Ren?

MC Ren - I was doing my little hustle on the street and I was MC'ing at the time at little house parties battlin' niggaz and shit like that. I started MC'ing in '83 in the 9th grade. When I got to the 12th grade I was about to go to the Army cause I was like, "this shit ain't even gonna crack." Plus we was from the west coast and niggaz was like, "you all ain't doing nothin, all the rappers are from the east," and shit like that. So I was fittin' to go to the army with my homeboy. I had already went to take the written test, I just had to do the other shit. I remember Eric came by one day and that's when he had "Boyz-N-The Hood" but it was just local and shit at the time.

ThaFormula.com - So you weren't down with them yet when he first did "Boyz-N-The Hood?"

MC Ren - Nah, that's how old it was. He did that shit way before that but it was just local then in the streets. When he did that he knew I could rhyme so he would come around to my mommas house and would say "I wanna check you out." So we went around there, he used to have some turntables there and equipment and shit so I started freestylin' for that nigga. He put a record on and started scratchin' while I was rappin' to the muthafucka just freestylin' for like 10 minutes.

ThaFormula.com - Was your style the same even then or did it change by the time you got on?

MC Ren - Yeah I think I kinda changed a little bit. I was more about lyrics like Run DMC kind of, you know how niggaz used to rhyme used to rhyme back then? So that nigga Eric told me to come around there I went around there and I was rappin', freestylin' and shit. He was scratchin' and cuttin' the records and shit cause he knew how to DJ and shit 'cause him and Dre used to have this little crew. I was rappin' for like 10 minutes and shit and that nigga took the tape and he went and let Dre hear the tape and Dre loved his shit. Then Eric came to me like, "I wanna sign you to a solo thing." So I wasn't even gonna be in the group NWA. He wanted to do me as a solo thang cause at that time they had did "Dopeman" and "8 Ball" right after the "Boyz-N-The Hood" thing. So Cube had wrote "Dopeman" and "8 Ball" and he wrote "Boyz-N-The Hood." So I came in and I was just gonna be the nigga that come in and do something on the side, a little solo thang. But when Cube had left, he went to school cause I guess he was figuring this shit wasn't gonna work, so he went to Arizona for like a year. Some trade school or some shit. As soon as that nigga left Eric got a deal with Priority. We was working the other shit on the street level so hard that when cube left it got so big that he got a deal for that shit. So Cube was gone and there was nobody to write his shit. So they came to me like, "nigga we need you to do this and this." So I remember I did "Radio," Eazy-Duz-It" and "Ruthless Villain." They still wasn't gonna let me in. It was just like I did those songs for that nigga. But the song "Ruthless Villain" I wrote for Eric and it was just gonna be his shit, but he couldn't say the muthafucka and he had the studio timed and it took him too long to say the vocals how I would say the vocals so Dre was like "man, just let Ren say the rap!" (Laughs). You know how niggaz be frustrated like "man just let that nigga do it 'cause he's wasting time."

ThaFormula.com - Now I got to ask you man. Was Eazy that bad in the studio as far as trying to get on beat?

MC Ren - Man, that nigga used to be bad. I ain't even gonna lie, them niggaz know it. He sound good on records but that nigga used to be terrible.

ThaFormula.com - Was it that bad man?

MC Ren - Nigga it was terrible! That nigga would be in that muthafucka and Dre would literally nigga just get a piece of paper and start doing like marks. Every time he would fuck up Dre would put a mark. Nigga his shit used to be in the hundreds. When that nigga used to do his vocals muthafuckas used to be like, "let that nigga do his shit last." When that nigga do his vocals muthafuckas used to leave. If we didn't have to do shit, wed be like "alright nigga we gone." Dre would have to sit in that muthafucka with that nigga all day. But anyway nigga that's how I got on. When I did Ruthless Villain, Boom! They was like "damn!" I remember we was in Hollywood and Eric was getting a P.O. Box and shit. Me, Eric, Dre and I think Yella was in the car. Cube was still gone to school. Dre was like, "man since its gonna take along time for you to do your solo shit, you might as well get in NWA" and at that time Arabian Prince was still in the group and shit. It was all of us and then Cube came back and that's when we started working on the "Eazy-Duz-It" album and then we did the other shit.

ThaFormula.com - So now let's get into the "NWA and the Posse" record, what was the deal with that?

MC Ren - See this how that happened. Eric first had "Boyz-N-The Hood" on Macola Records. So one day before we got the deal with Priority, he was going through Macola. So all the muthafuckas on the NWA and the posse record, that was the first shit and remember I told you I wasn't there and they already had "Dopeman," "8 Ball" and all that. That's why if you look on the back, its just a picture of Eazy, Cube, Dre, and Arabian Prince and then on the front it's me, Train and everybody, 'cause Eric was like, we doing this record, everybody come on we gonna take this album picture. So at first that shit wasn't no NWA and the Posse. It was just NWA when it was on Macola right. But when that shit blew up and we got on Priority and that shit blew up, homie just re-released it like it's NWA and the Posse and he went and got everybody that was on that album cover that had records out and let them add to it and he put it out like shady muthafuckaz do. That shit was like some wack shit and that's why we never supported that record. Muthafuckas would come up to us like yeah that "NWA and the Posse" shit and we 'd be like "man that ain't our record." That's just like some Lonzo type shit like he put out some shit after Dre left Wreckin' Cru.

ThaFormula.com - So was D.O.C. down with you guys at that time?

MC Ren - When that record came out, he was down with us and that's why they put him on there and they went and dug up some old shit that Dre did with them niggaz.

ThaFormula.com - What was Arabian Princes' involvement in everything?

MC Ren - See when I came in the group he was already in the group and the reason that he was in the group was 'cause when Eric put the group together, he used to always say "man NWA is a all-star rap group," but it really wasn't no real all stars at the time, and he was just going around trying to get niggaz that he thought would do something in his group. Like Arabian was doing shit with Egyptian Lover and that type of shit Dre with the Wrecking Cru and Cube did with C.I.A. So that's how Arabian got in doing that fast Techno type music. 'Cause at first Eric wanted NWA to do that and have that involved in it. 'Cause that was that L.A. shit too, but as we started doing our shit and doing the record, that shit didn't fit in. It was like we in here making these songs and that shit don't fit in and its like the press we getting for the shit that we making and the kind of shit we doing that shit don't fit in. To us it was like that shit is old now and it don't fit in.

ThaFormula.com - Would you consider the "Eazy-Duz-It" LP a crew album, meaning did it take every member of the crew to make that album happen?

MC Ren - Yep. It took everybody. It was just like working on a NWA album but it's just like this is Eazy's album. Cause me D.O.C., Cube, and Dre did all the writing for that nigga. Back in them days he didn't ever do no writing. Eric didn't start writing on his shit till like he did the "5150" album and shit like that.

ThaFormula.com - Yeah that shit was terrible man...

MC Ren - Yeah, see when Dre was gone that's when he started writing his own shit.

ThaFormula.com - Now what about the production of "Eazy-Duz-It?" Was everyone involved in that album?

MC Ren - Nah, that was just straight Dre. Every album was just straight Dre. It had on there produced by Dre & Yella but Yella was just like his assistant and shit. Like, "do this for me, hand me that, push that." It was all Dre with the beats. Dre would just be in there like, "we 'gon rap to this one." He was controllin' all that and that's why it was so hard.

ThaFormula.com - So the "Eazy-Duz-It" album had just dropped and everything seemed good, how were you feelin'?

MC Ren - I was feelin good cause we was about to do our NWA album. I was just happy to be down. I was just happy to be able to write on that niggaz shit and to be on the cover and little shit like that.

ThaFormula.com - Even though I get depressed at times on how Hip-Hop has turned out, I still love the fact that at least I got to witness Hip-Hop at its prime which makes me also think about how you must feel to be considered part of that prime?

MC Ren - Yeah shit is crazy man, I was just thinkin' about that shit too. The shit is crazy 'cause back then when we was doing that shit, ain't no way niggaz would of knew how that shit was gonna be big like it was. Nigga, that's the crazy part about it, that's the crazy part about it.

ThaFormula.com - Another thing that I think about from back then is when you guys recorded this, you guys were still in the streets where nowadays muthafuckas are recording from Hollywood. I'm sure after Eazy's album and even "Straight Outta Compton" that it must have felt great to walk in the hood and see everybody giving you your props?

MC Ren - Hell yeah.

ThaFormula.com - Which just shows me how things have changed. So at that point in time were you thinking of a solo album yet or were you never really thinkin' about a solo album?

MC Ren - I didn't start thinking about no solo shit 'till I did it. When Dre left that's when I started thinking of solo shit. But the original plan was we all was gonna do solo shit originally. Everybody said yo Eazy is gonna do his first, and if Cube wouldn't have left, Cube was gonna do one, then I was gonna do one and then another NWA album. That's how the whole shit was gonna go, but then after Cube left and Dre left that's the only time I really was like "yo let me do my shit," because it was to much beef going on. It was like Eric was mad with Dre and Dre was mad and I was like, "you know I'm just gonna stay neutral and just do my own shit."
ThaFormula.com - So up next after the "Eazy-Duz-It" came "Straight Outta Compton," how was it recording that?

MC Ren - It was cool man. I remember everyday we was in the studio. Go at 12 o'clock and stay there all night.

ThaFormula.com - Did you guys know what your were about to do as far as the concepts for the album?

MC Ren - Yeah, if you listen to "Straight Out of Compton," and "Fuck tha Police," them probably the only two on there that's talkin' like serious shit, but as far as them two songs go, yeah. I remember we was at Dre's apartment and we was going over "Fuck tha Police." Me, Cube, Dre all of us was there. I remember us writing it on paper. "How we gonna do this, we gonna make Fuck tha Police, we gonna make a chorus and shit going on in the song." I remember writing all this shit down in the studio. Niggaz busting their lyrics and it was like friendly competition. Muthafuckas writing their shit and a nigga hear another niggaz shit and be like, "ah man I'll be back." I remember one time we did "Still Talkin' Shit" and Cube heard everybody's shit and he was like "damn!" Man that nigga went the next day, beat everybody to the studio early in the morning and changed the shit 'cause he was like "damn." That's how it was. Niggaz would go over there and change their shit. Ask "what you got?" "Ah fuck that I gotta go change my shit." But that made that shit hard cause it was like you was on there by yourself but your really on there with a group. So them days was off the hook man.

ThaFormula.com - It seems like you had a major influence from the East in your rhyme style, did you?

MC Ren - Yeah I did. RUN DMC. Muthafuckin' LL, Whodini, and just a lot of them. I used to just try to get my delivery like them. DMC was one of my favorites. That niggaz voice was just so muthafuckin' cold.

ThaFormula.com - Did everything that was recorded for the "Eazy-Duz-It" and "Niggaz4Life" albums make the albums?

MC Ren - Nah there was shit that didn't even make it. Tight shit too man. I remember I had some tight shit for the "Niggaz4Life" album. I remember we had a gang of shit for the "Niggaz4Life" album and most of that shit didn't make it. But basically the first shit like "Straight Outta Compton" it seems like everything we did made it on that muthafucka 'cause we just did what was gonna make it on there.

ThaFormula.com - So now when "Straight Outta Compton" came out that's when all the controversy began?

MC Ren - Yeah with the "Fuck tha Police" shit and we didn't even give a fuck. Our thing was like any publicity is good publicity. Muthafuckas would be like "that's bad publicity," but we didn't give a fuck and we would tell muthafuckas on the news we don't care if y'all are doing this shit, we like it.

ThaFormula.com - Were you guys prepared for this when you did the album?

MC Ren - Nah. Shit, we didn't know that we was gonna get a letter from the FBI and all that shit. Nah, I didn't know that. But we didn't give a fuck. You gotta think man, niggaz young and we didn't care. They helped our shit sell.

ThaFormula.com - Now how were those NWA tours man when you look back?

MC Ren - Man those muthafuckas was off the chain. They was big arenas. I remember every city we went to damn near, we had to go to press conferences and shit cause muthafuckas didn't want us there. Like the community leaders and muthafuckin' fake ass gherri curl wearin' preachers and shit. All them type of muthafuckas trying to get their little limelight and publicity when there was a gang of other shit they could have been talkin' about. But we still performed. But it used to be cool man, you know all of us rollin' on the bus and shit on tour having to share rooms and shit (Laughs). Stupid shit like that. We sold out every night. When we first went on the road nigga we used to drive in vans, we couldn't even fly cause we wasn't making all that money. So we used to have to drive in vans all around the muthafuckin' West Coast doing spot dates here and there like crazy. I remember our first tour we did was with UTFO, Salt-N-Pepa and Heavy D. We opened for them and they was looking at us like who the fuck is y'all. This was before "Straight Outta Compton." They would look and Cube and Eazy with they're gherri curls and be like "who the fuck is y'all niggaz?" (Laughs). I could feel that shit back then, like some of them New York niggaz was kind of arrogant. Like "y'all ain't no true Hip-Hop," or "y'all from the West." But then when "Straight Outta Compton" came out we had our own muthafuckin' tour and everything changed. Matter fact we played the Apollo before "Straight Outta Compton" came out when "Eazy-Duz-It" I think had just came out or something or probably right before we played the Apollo with all the New York niggaz. It was like some big ass Summer jam type shit, but it was at the Apollo. Nigga we got booed, they threw shit at us. We was the only ones man and then we had to walk back downstairs and all these New York niggaz looking at us cause they got they monitors down in them muthafuckas. They lookin' at us and I was like man, nigga you ever been somewhere where you just wanna disappear? (Laughs). Everybody lookin' at y'all like, "damn y'all got booed." But I remember after that when I had dropped "Kizz My Black Azz" and I went back to New York. I did like two shows at the Apollo and that shit was off the hook. And then I heard Cube went back when he did hid first album and muthafuckas went crazy. I remember somebody told me that that niggaz said when he was out there he was like, "yeah we came here and we booed the first time, but I'm about to rock this muthafcuka," and them muthafuckas went crazy. But it was a whole 180. Nigga I remember when we first went to New York which was when "Rebel without a Pause" came out when KDAY used to be bumpin' it. And when our shit, "Straight Outta Compton" came out, I remember we went to New York probably like a month later or some shit like that for some press shit. At that time the record was kind of getting big and shit nigga, and I remember Hank Shocklee of the Bomb Squad was up in the club and nigga knew all our names and shit. I was like "what the fuck?" and I was trippin' 'cause he was talkin' to Dre and shit 'cause you know how the two beat muthafuckas always find each other. I seen them two niggaz talkin' and Hank Shocklee was laughin' like "I can't believe y'all niggaz are here!" Dre was pointing at everybody I remember. He was like "this is so and so," and Hank was like "yeah I know, this is Ren, this is Eazy." Nigga he knew who I was and that tripped me out. I was like, "this nigga be fuckin' with PE and they got this hot ass shit, and this nigga know us?"

ThaFormula.com - Yeah and at that time the only producers who could fuck with Dre was the Bomb Squad…

MC Ren - Exactly and that's why Cube went to those muthafuckas.

ThaFormula.com - That's why I feel that was the only move Cube could have done and was the smartest…

MC Ren - Yeah. No other producer could have just came with no shit to just keep him like that. He went to the right muthafuckin' spot.

ThaFormula.com - So know at this point in time had you, Dre, Cube or Yella seen any money?

MC Ren - Nope. Hell Nah!!

ThaFormula.com - So you guys are having fun and all but when did the first problems start coming? 'Cause I know it's always about the money…

MC Ren - Yeah, I remember we was in muthafuckin' Arizona. Cube came to me and was says "Jerry Heller is coming up here and they want us to sign a new contract, you know he is taking advantage of muthafuckas cause we don't Know." How you just gonna pop up on a nigga with contracts and no lawyers or nothing? So that lets you know that that muthafucka was a snake. So anyway, Cube told me "I'm not signing that shit." He came to me and was like, "don't sign it." This the niggaz exact words. He said, "I could say I ain't gonna sign it and I'm just one person and the shit can still go down, but if you say it, me and you together then can't nothing happen if me and you both don't sign." I remember we were supposed to sign the shit and get 70 G'z. I ain't never seen 70 G'z know what I'm saying? So Cube was like, "I ain't signing it." So Cube didn't sign that shit and there was a little animosity. Everybody was like, "why didn't he sign it?" Nigga I had never seen no 70 G'z before in my life," and I was like, "Eric grew up right around the corner with me," I was like "this is my nigga, he brought me in and I'ma take this 70 G'z 'cause I ain't gonna get this shit nowhere else."

ThaFormula.com - So what was Dre thinking at this time?

MC Ren - Dre took it. He took the money. So Cube left. I signed, Dre signed, Yella signed.

ThaFormula.com - So did you tell Cube that you were gonna sign?

MC Ren - I think I told that nigga something like "man I ain't got no money, I ain't got no paper, I ain't got nothing." I was like "nigga I been rappin' for nothing this long and nigga fittin' to give me 70 G'z?" Shit and this was 1988, I was only 18.

ThaFormula.com - So that was basically the only reason Cube left right?

MC Ren - Yeah.

ThaFormula.com - 'Cause a lot of rumors got started about him leaving also because his solo album didn't come up next…

MC Ren - Nah, it wasn't no ego shit like that. It wasn't even like that. It was because he was like, "nigga we should get more money." He saw what I didn't see. I should have seen it. He was like, "nigga we need to get more money," because me and him used to always talk to Eric and say we wanted more money. 'Cause me and Cube used to get less 'cause we was the rappers and he would say, 'cause y'all not doing the beats." We would be like, "why they getting more then us?" "'Cause they doing the beats," he would say. Why Yella get more than us? 'Cause he doing this to help Dre. We was like, "but he ain't doing what we doing?"

ThaFormula.com - So you and Cube were making less then everybody else?

MC Ren - Everybody, and so that's the way it all happened. That nigga left.

ThaFormula.com - What were your thoughts when he left?

MC Ren - I was thinking young and stupid 'cause I was only like 18 or 19. I was Thinking that it's fucked up, that nigga shouldn't have left because we had a publicist at the time. She use to be like anytime interviews would pop up she would call Cube. She wouldn't call nobody else but Cube. So when he left the group she ended up being his manager so we felt that she had that shit planned all along. Cause Eric used to always complain to Priority like "why do she always call him for the interviews?" That bitch had probably another plan. Matter of fact, she started doing all his "Friday" movies with him and all of that. So there was animosity cause niggaz was thinkin' this shit was planned. So the beef just formed out of that shit. Matter of fact me and him never really had no beef. 'Cause even when he left the group, he went to New York and he would call me from New York when he was working with the Bomb Squad. Me and him was supposed to do a song for his album called "The Villain and the Gangsta." He was like, "man we gonna do this song," but we couldn't do the mutherfucka 'cause them niggaz got all mad and it was like all that animosity them niggaz had. It was like, "man that nigga this, and that" and then he stopped talkin' to me and we stopped talkin'.

ThaFormula.com - What did Dre think about this at the time?

MC Ren - Dre was mad that nigga left 'cause Dre brought him in so he was mad and that's why when Cube had his record he was on his homegirl Dee Barns show "Pump It Up" one night. I didn't have no beef with the nigga. It was all cool and everything but them niggaz was kind of hot and Cube said some shit on there like "I got all suckaz "100 miles and Runnin'" or some shit. He said that and we was like, "Ohh!!"

ThaFormula.com - So she set that show up with both of you (NWA and Ice Cube) on it without you even knowing right?

MC Ren - Yeah we didn't even know. She could have came to us and said "we want you all on the show," or "we want to do something," but she just did that shit for her ratings I guess, and that nigga outspoken like he was back then and said "I got all these suckaz 100 Miles and Runnin'" and we was like "what!" When he did that niggaz was hot and then he wanted to use on "Jackin' for Beats" when it comes on and says "Gimme that beat fool," he had our shit on there originally from the" Niggaz4Life" album. You know the "Prelude" beat, he had that on there first but since he was on Priority and our "Niggaz4Llife" album was fittin' to come out, we told Brian Turner 'cause he let us hear it first. We was in his office and he said, "I want you all to hear this song." He let us hear it and we was like "hell nah!" I remember Dre was like "fuck that, he can't use our beat" cause Dre made that beat. He was "like this man ain't gonna use our beat and be clowning us" you know what I'm saying? So Dre told him "if this nigga uses our beat, we ain't fuckin' with you," and Brian Turner told that nigga he couldn't use it 'cause he knew that the "Niggaz4Life" album was coming and he knew like "I can't let Cube use this muthafucka cause NWA is hot and they ain't gonna finish this muthafuckin' album if I let him do this."

ThaFormula.com - But in between all this you all did the "100 Miles and Runnin'" EP and you knew now that it was your time to step up. How did you feel about that?

MC Ren - When that nigga left, I knew I had to pick my shit up 'cause Dre wasn't really no rapper. He wasn't really no hell of a rapper back then and shit. He just would fill in. But when Cube left he started rapping more, but I always knew I had to pick it up. I was writing my shit, Eric's shit, Dre was helping write Eric shit, 'cause when Cube left we still had me, D.O.C. and Dre.

ThaFormula.com - So Dre actually wrote his shit?

MC Ren - Yeah, he wrote some of his shit. He write some of his shit and some of his shit he don't write. You can tell shit he writes. D.O.C. would write a lot of Dre's shit too. You could tell when you hear a lot of Dre shit if DOC wrote it.

ThaFormula.com - So even through all this and when you dissed Cube on the "Real Niggaz" track, were you still cool with Cube?

MC Ren - Nah, nah hell nah. Nah, Nah, Nah, I wasn't cool with that nigga at that time. It's crazy 'cause I went out on the "Up In Smoke Tour" with that nigga and me and that nigga was talkin' about them disses we did and I said "yeah nigga, I didn't even get a chance to do a whole verse on your ass." I said "nigga I would have got you!" He looked at me like "yeah ok." I said "alright nigga, you got a verse and some shit on me, but I never got a verse or song."

ThaFormula.com - Now when that dropped and Cube dropped his shit a lot of people thought NWA was through. "Niggaz4Life" hadn't dropped yet and I remember a lot of people were ready to call you guys over, did you guys hear any of this?

MC Ren - A little bit 'cause nigga, that was motivating us 'cause we was like "niggaz think we ain't gonna do shit 'cause Cube left." That was the first thing we thought. But them muthafuckas had to eat all they words though cause "Niggaz4Life" was a classic muthafuckin' album man. But I do be wishing Cube could have been on it. Can you imagine if that nigga was on that album?

ThaFormula.com - I don't know. I never thought those beats were meant for Cube. I thought that it was as good as it could have been and that no one ever rode a Dre beat like you which "Alwayz Into Something" proved…

MC Ren - Yeah that's my cut right there.

ThaFormula.com - And I loved the "Prelude" track 'cause you always dissed wack rappers and sell outs who did wack love songs…

MC Ren - And I'ma keep dissin' their wack asses.
ThaFormula.com - So how were you guys feelin' after "Niggaz4Life" dropped?

MC Ren - We was feelin' cool.  We was supposed to go on tour for that shit.  We was planning out a "Niggaz4Life" tour.  We were getting our props ready and had muthafuckas coming to build our stage, and that's when Dre left.

ThaFormula.com - Were you guys still kicking it at this time or was everybody doing their own thing?

MC Ren - We was cool.  It's like one day Dre came to me and said, somebody I know wanna holla at us because we ain't getting paid right.  So I remember going down there to Solar records.  At that time Dre and Suge was kickin' it real tough and shit.  Suge told Dre about this dude at Solar and I remember going down there and meeting with them, and that's when Dre left.

ThaFormula.com - What did you say when Dre took you down to Solar?

MC Ren - From what I saw, I just saw one nigga trying to get niggaz to come over with him.  I mean I had seen alot more money by then.  I still wasn't getting what I was supposed to be getting, but I wasn't going to go into another fucked up situation.  My street smarts said, fuck this.  This is a worse situation.  That's why I didn't do it.  Then when Dre left, Eric was saying we still gonna do NWA.  I'm happy I didn't go along with the shit.  He said were gonna do the NWA album and we gonna get some more producers.  He was saying Yella, Hutch and some new people are gonna produce it.  I told him an NWA album is not gonna work without Dre doing the beats.  I wasn't about to play myself though.  Cube left, Dre left.  The beat mutherfuckers and one of the hardest lyricists in the group.  We ain't got shit.  I wasn't about to rap over any niggaz beat back then, because you know niggaz beats back then was wack.  I mean how you gonna go from the top muthafucka to that.  When I told Eazy I wasn't gonna do the NWA album, me and him didn't talk for like a year or two.  Probably longer then that.  When Dre was doing the first Chronic album, I was still talking to Dre.  I would go to his house and be kicking it.  That's why Snoop says in the Intro of the Chronic, "What up Ren."  Cause I used to be there kicking it with niggaz.  I told Erick and Dre that the problem was between them and that I didn't have nothing to do with that.  I'm not about to be dissin' neither of you.  That's why when Eazy was dissin' Dre, I wasn't in on that and Dre dissin' him, I wasn't in on that.  I was just neutral.

thaFormula.com - So I'm sure you heard the Chronic before it dropped.  How did you feel about it?

MC Ren - I thought the shit was tight.  I remember when it first came out.  Erick was in the studio going through the first Chronic album saying, this shit is wack.  All the little groupies around him were saying yeah that shit is wack.  I said, nigga this shit is hard.

thaFormula.com - So there was no way you could have been on the Chronic?

MC Ren - Yeah, because of all that shit that was going on. 

thaFormula.com - So when did you decide to do your first EP, "Kiss My Black Azz"?

MC Ren - When I saw the group wasn't gonna do no more shit.  So I went and got Bobcat.  When we was on tour during the NWA days, he was on tour with LL and we used to always kick it back in them days.  So we hooked up and did that shit.

thaFormula.com - It did pretty good for you right?

MC Ren - Yeah it went platinum and shit.  I got that muthafuckin plaque. 

thaFormula.com - What made you decide to do an EP and not an LP?

MC Ren - Cause I wanted to test the waters dog.  I didn't wanna do an album and have muthafuckas not feelin' me.  So I did the EP to see how muthafuckas react to it. 

thaFormula.com - Did the death of DJ Train really fuck you up alot cause you guys used to always roll together?

MC Ren - Yep.  Me and him went to high school together.  When I told him I rapped, he told me that he was a DJ.  So I went to his house and this muthafucka started doing shit on the turntable I had never seen.  He was pickin' the muthafuckas up at like a 45 degree angle and the needle was even jumpin'.  So when Erick signed JJ Fad they needed a DJ.  They weren't hard or nothing, but Train was hard.  I remember Train was in the 12th grade and their shit started jumpin' before our shit.  He was on the Run's House tour flying in and out of town.  That nigga was tight as a muthafucka man.  That was my nigga all the way from high school. 

thaFormula.com - What exactly did happen to Train man?

MC Ren - His house caught on fire.  He thought his son was still in the house and his son had left.  His son momma had came and got him.  So he was thinking his son was still in that muthafucka.  He went back in after he got everybody out thinking his son was still in there, but he wasn't.  So he went in there and got all that smoke caught up in him.  That was some wack ass shit.

thaFormula.com - Was he a big reason that you started changing up your style after the EP and going towards the more righteous path?

MC Ren - Yeah.  He would give me tapes on Egypt and tell me we were gonna go there.  So yeah my shit did start changing.  I went into the Nation of Islam in 1993 and got out in 1995.  Went to Egypt in 1995.  Me and Train was supposed to go together and he couldn't make it, so I said fuck it, Imma go anyway.

thaFormula.com - How was going to Egypt?

MC Ren - It was the shit.  I went out there for about  two and half weeks.

thaFormula.com - Now your album was supposed to be called "Life Sentence."  Was it because of that situation that you changed the title?

MC Ren - Yeah. 

thaFormula.com - How did you feel about the "Shock of the Hour" album and how did that do for you?

MC Ren - Back then it sold like 480,000 copies when E was alive.  It was cool.   The first side of that muthafucka I recorded before I even got into the Nation.  If you listen to it you can tell.  The second half of that album is when I was in the nation.

thaFormula.com - I have to ask you this man before I forget.  When Cube dropped "No Vaseline" what did you guys think about it?

MC Ren - Nigga I was ready to mash.  Niggaz was mad.  Like "oh, this nigga wanna do it like this."  I was mad.  That was the greatest sneak attack ever. 

thaFormula.com - Would you say that he won that battle?

MC Ren - Nah he didn't win!  How he gonna win and I ain't put my gloves on.  That's like that movie Ali when he's in the car with Joe Frazier saying yeah, but you ain't the real champ.  I didn't get my chance.  I will never get my chance cause me and him are cool as a muthafucka.  Even if we did, it probably wouldn't be like it would have been then. 

thaFormula.com - Did you guys feel it on the streets as far as people fucking with you about it?

MC Ren - Yep, everything.  I remember I went somewhere to this party at a hall and muthafuckas was playing it, and I remember trippin' on them telling them to take that shit off (laughs).  I remember one time I was in Compton where my homeboy was doing a video show for this cable station, and this punk ass nigga was trying to play that in the background.  You know them jealous ass niggaz and shit, but fuck them.  We got the last laugh though cause all of us is cool now.

thaFormula.com - Is it true that Dre didn't produce that whole first Above The Law album?

MC Ren - Alot of that shit was done before Dre touched it.  Hutch did alot of that shit before Dre even came and sat down.  We was on tour and Laylaw brought them in.  He had they shit and we used to listen to it when we was on the "Straight Outta Compton" tour.  So alot of the songs on that first album were already done.  Hutch did that shit along time ago. 

thaFormula.com - So now you dropped your EP and your solo.  At this point how are you feeling coming into your next album "Villain In Black"?

MC Ren - I was feelin' good dog.  Happy that me and Hutch hooked up.  Me and that nigga used to be in the studio damn near like everyday.  To me though, it's harder now then back then.  Now when I'm in the studio with niggaz, it's a different feelin' from back then.   

thaFormula.com - So at this time were you and Eazy not speaking still?

MC Ren - Yeah.  That's why he wasn't on none of my albums and why I wasn't really on his shit.  He knew we didn't have shit to say to each other, but he knew he still could make money off my shit.  The only thing was that after we had the fall out, when my records came out, they never pushed them like they should have pushed them.  Cause my "Shock The Hour" went to number 1 on the Billboard Charts, but I didn't get no Gold or no Platinum Plaque.  If you go number 1, come on.  My shit was number 1 all around everywhere.  They didn't promote it and I think it had alot to do with the shit I was sayin'.  It scared alot of muthafuckas. It felt like a nigga got blacklisted or something.  That's the vibe I got from niggaz.  It just seems like nobody wanted to talk about that record.  So what could I do. 

thaFormula.com - What do you think Tupac would say if he saw all these Tupac clones runnin' around?

MC Ren - Come on dog.  If Tupac was alive, he would be giving all these niggaz hell, 50 Cent included.  INCLUDED!  All of them niggaz would catch it.

thaFormula.com - So how did you feel about "Villain In Black"?

MC Ren - It was cool.  The only thing is my budgets kept getting smaller, smaller, and smaller.  They wouldn't give me the paper I needed.  They was looking at it like if he don't want to talk to us and don't want to do this then fuck it.  That's how it went.  But if I would have helped them diss Dre, man I probably would have got all kinds of shit.

thaFormula.com – So that's why BG Knockout and Dresta kept getting promoted?

MC Ren - Yep.  If you see, they got promoted more then I did and I was there for the longest.  Fake ass company.

thaFormula.com - So after that came your last album "Ruthless For Life".  It seemed like you were out of it on that album...

MC Ren - Yeah I was.  I ain't even gonna lie, I was.  Nigga was going through shit.  All kind of problems.  Nigga was out of it on that album.  I'm more into it now then I was in that time.

thaFormula.com - So in between "Ruthless For Life" and now you just disappeared.  What happened man?

MC Ren - Dog, I was just chillin' with my family, still working on music.  I left Ruthless and I just didn't want to be in one of them situations again like that.  So I just started making music.  I did a little independent film.  So just little shit like that trying to stay busy and get shit crackin' again.  It wasn't my fault though.  A nigga was going through shit making other transitions, then the game changed.  So when I came back, the game had changed drastically.  Muthafuckas was dead, muthafuckas ain't working here, gone.  Shit wasn't the same.  But I just realized that that's how life is and things are gonna always change. 

thaFormula.com - So when you got out of Ruthless did you approach other labels?

MC Ren - Yeah.  They was saying that they wasn't trying to fuck with me.  The sound that I was giving them, they didn't want that shit.  They wanted more radio friendly type shit.  They don't wanna hear like a hard muthafucka with lyrics, they wanna hear some dancing shit.  They wanna hear a beat come on that they can get on Power 106.  They wanted that happy shit and I ain't got that shit.  I couldn't make that if I tried.  I would play myself.  I love Run DMC.  But they even went through that shit when they made that record "Pause."  You never thought you would see them dancing like that.  To go from the Adidas and derbies and all that dope shit to be with white hats and big medallions dancing.  Come on man.  But that's the game.  Even legendary muthafuckas like them get confused.  You just got to realize that we are legends in this shit.  We can't be what we used to be, but we still here.

thaFormula.com - So it took many years but you finally got back to working with Dre on Chronic 2001.  How did that come about?

MC Ren - My homeboy said that Dre wants you to come down, so I went down there and did it.  I was rappin' on the muthafucka.  I was on another song bustin', but he took me off of it and put this other nigga on it.  There was a dude originally on there, but when I came, I got on there.  Then niggaz told me that the reason they took me off was because the nigga that was on there was crying about it.

thaFormula.com - That's wack...

MC Ren - You know man. Little bitch shit.  Nigga took me off and shit.

thaFormula.com - After you guys all recorded "Chin Check", what happened with the NWA project?

MC Ren - Ain't nothing really happened and shit.  Cube was doing his movie and wanted us to do that shit.  Then we did "Hello" for his album and we were supposed to work on the NWA project on the road, but it never went down.

thaFormula.com - I remember when you guys did Farm Club on TV.  I remember Dre's expression when you said you wanted to tour and record the new album.  I knew from seeing Dre's expression that that shit was never going to happen.

MC Ren - It was on Dre.  We was ready.  Me and Cube was ready, but we weren't gonna keep begging this dude to do no record.  We had a studio out there to do it, but it didn't happen so fuck it.  I don't give a fuck.  I do but I don't cause it's over with now.  I ain't fittin' to cry over that shit.  "Chin Check" was alright, but "Hello" was better to me.  It was better but it just wasn't like it used to be.  Muthafuckas be having a gang of niggaz now in the studios.  When we used to record back in the day nobody would really be there, only a few people.
 

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #52 on: November 14, 2007, 12:57:54 PM »
now that you're posting all these interviews here, i might as well post the more recent interviews:

Quote
The studio-obsessed producer has left his mark on Eminem and 50 Cent, to name-drop a few. And he's not about to rush his final solo CD.

By Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
September 23, 2007


"We go until it happens," rap producer Dr. Dre says about all the time he spends in the recording studio searching for hits, once as long as 79 hours in a single stretch. "When the ideas are coming," says the man who is one of the half-dozen most influential producers of the modern pop era, "I don't stop until the ideas stop because that train doesn't come along all the time."

Some hip-hop fans, however, must be wondering if this particular train isn't off the track. Dre (real name: Andre Young) has been working on his third solo album, "Detox," for nearly eight years, a time frame that invites uncomfortable comparison with such earlier pop music train wrecks as Phil Spector, Brian Wilson and Axl Rose. All three were fabulously successful artists who found it so hard to live up to their own expectations that they each ran into creative paralysis.

But there are differences between Dre and the others, he and those close to him say. The 42-year-old Compton native hasn't just been working on his own album all these years.

As a producer and head of Aftermath Entertainment, Dre has also contributed to albums by Eminem, 50 Cent, the Game and others. Plus, he has "mixed" tracks -- fine-tuning the musical dynamics -- for more than a dozen other artists, including Gwen Stefani, Eve and Mary J. Blige.

Dre will now devote two months to working on Eminem's new album. "We'll be trying to get his thing done and work on a few things on my own project," Dre says.

It's an exhausting pace and it's possible only because of what Dre calls his obsession with the studio.

To achieve his level of success -- Dre has put his seductive hip-hop stamp on albums that have taken in more than $1 billion worldwide -- you obviously need musical talent.

"Dre is 'the Natural,' " says Interscope Records chief Jimmy Iovine. "Lots of producers have hits, but he does far more than that. He's a creator who has moved popular culture three times . . . with gangsta rap, G-funk and Eminem."

Yet the more you talk to Dre, the more you realize that another key element has been a mental toughness that enabled him to walk away from fast-lane excesses and a runaway ego.

Dre's greatest gift, in fact, may be the strong will that has helped him to recognize the most important things in his life -- the recording studio, his family and, most recently, weight training -- and strip away everything that doesn't serve those priorities.

In the early '90s, Dre was being hailed as the new king of hip-hop for defining gangsta rap with N.W.A and then expanding rap's mainstream appeal with the alluring G-funk style that combined melodic, old-school R&B and hard-core hip-hop sensibilities.

But amid the sudden fame, Dre appeared to be spending as much time partying and in court as he did in the studio. The turning point came after he served time in jail in 1995 for violating the probation he received after breaking another rap producer's jaw in 1992.

He jettisoned the bad behavior and, among other things, severed ties with trouble-plagued Death Row Records, signing a multimillion-dollar deal with Interscope Records and the Universal Music Group that resulted in Dre's Aftermath label.

The accompanying hoopla and dollar signs led to another hazardous period. After closing the deal, Dre went on a signing spree, convinced he could turn out hits with virtually anyone. He admits the move took a personal and professional toll.

"When we started Aftermath, we had something like 20 artists and it was driving me crazy," the 6-foot-1 producer said on the patio of his English-style country estate in the West San Fernando Valley. "I couldn't sit down and focus on any of it, plus it was doubly hard because you ended up crushing these people's dreams when you had to let them go."

On the strength of his name, "Dr. Dre Presents . . . The Aftermath," a 1996 album, was certified platinum (1 million sold), but it had little lasting effect. The humbling experience taught Dre that even with his talents he, as a producer, needs quality artists and a top support crew to make noteworthy records. Aftermath too went through a stripping back process. Its roster now includes fewer than a dozen artists.

"People are always coming up to me, thinking I've got some magic wand that can make them a star and I want to tell them that no one can do that," he says. "Making hit records is not that easy. But it took me time to realize that myself."

Now, Dre is planning another dramatic move, one designed in part to give him even more time in the studio. The long-awaited "Detox," he says, will be his final solo album.

Though claims of "final albums" have often proved to be as short-lived as farewell tours, you sense a burden lifting as Dre talks about saying good-bye to the solo career. He loves being in the studio, whether working on his songs or someone else's. But he doesn't enjoy the other duties that go along with a solo career, including interviews, live shows and other promotional activities. By eliminating all that, Dre is further sharpening his focus on his studio obsession.

"The actual making of a record is the most exciting part of this business," he says. "I don't make records so I can sit down afterward and listen to them. I make them so other people can sit down and listen to them."

Talk about hits

DRE appears as relaxed as can be on the grounds of his gated mansion on a weekday afternoon, refreshed from a couple of hours at the gym and looking forward to going into the studio later in the day. You'd never know from his easygoing manner that the rap kingpin dislikes interviews so much that this is his first one in three years.

He's a wonderful storyteller who delights in the surprising details behind some of his hits. At the moment, he's in the middle of a story about how he found Snoop Dogg, whose silky vocal style contributed greatly to the G-funk classic, "Nuthin but a 'G' Thang."

Dre was at a bachelor party in the early '90s when he heard Snoop's voice on an amateur tape. He liked the way Snoop rhymed over the beats and invited him into the studio.

"I was mainly interested in how he responded to directions," Dre continues. "That's always an important test with me. Talent gets you in the door, but there are other things I consider, like, 'Do I want to work with this guy? Can we click? Can we laugh and talk in the studio?' If not, I'd rather work with someone else."

Seriously? Would Dre really pass up a sure-fire hit if it was brought into the studio by an absolute jerk?

Dre pauses briefly at the question, then laughs. "Well," he says, finally. "I'd probably take the song and then have him sit out in the lobby while I worked on it."

It's the music that matters

DRE has been talking freely for nearly 90 minutes about the studio. The only pauses are to talk to Nicole, his wife of 11 years, about spending the weekend with their kids at their house in Malibu.

For Dre, spending as much time as possible in the studio is as important as keeping your ears open, a point that leads to the matter of interviews. Nothing personal, he says, they're just another distraction.

Dre was blessed with a gift for music, a mom who encouraged him to pursue that gift rather than gangs and an aunt who just happened to live down the street from another young hip-hop fan, O'Shea Jackson, who adopted the professional name Ice Cube.

"I always loved the way music made me feel," Dre says, sipping water from a bottle. "I did sports at school and all, but when I got home, it was just music. Everybody in my neighborhood loved music. I could jump the back fence and be in the park where there were ghetto blasters everywhere."

By the time Dre and Ice Cube hooked up in the mid-'80s, both had spent countless hours honing their skills. Dre, four years older, was a master of turntables, his confidence boosted by all the nights he played records for the dance crowd at the Eve After Dark nightclub in Compton. Cube's forte was lyrics.

After they joined N.W.A, Dre supplied the sonic explosiveness, while Cube wrote the key raps for "Straight Outta Compton," the alternately angry and witty late-'80s album that made gangsta rap a sensation. The success of N.W.A showed Dre the importance of following your instincts and not worrying about the latest trends.

"I mean, think about it," he says. "We couldn't have done anything more unlikely in music business terms. We were making a record that we knew no one would play on the radio because of the language and that no major label would even release."

Dre followed his instincts again with 1992's "The Chronic" by using live instruments when the vogue in rap was building tracks around turntable dynamics and "samples" from old recordings. "There is some sampling on my records and a lot of what I call replays, where I'd have musicians come in the studio and replay the sample from the original record," he says. "But mainly, we'd come up with our own music."

Dre's favorite moment during the making of "The Chronic" may have been the time Snoop Dogg phoned the studio from jail while Dre happened to be working on "Nuthin' but." "I can't even remember why he was in jail, but I thought his voice would be perfect for the song," Dre says, smiling. "So, I told him to stay on the line while I duct-taped the receiver of the phone to the microphone. That's how he did vocal for our demo for ' "G" Thang.' I wish I could find that demo now. You could hear all the jail sounds in the background. It was crazy."

Fifteen years after that recording session, Dre still seems to savor the moment -- as much as the success of the record itself, which was named single of the decade by Spin magazine.

For Dre, a hit record starts with a hit sound, which sounds simple. But the search is what requires those long hours in the studio. The producer normally heads into the studio around 3 p.m. weekdays, the weekends being reserved for the family and for his hobbies, which include sports and photography. Because the studio in Sherman Oaks is like a second home, Dre likes the atmosphere to be as comfortable and relaxed as possible.

"One of the most important things for a producer is to realize you don't know everything," says Dre, whose studio techniques are largely self-taught. "I love having people in the studio that I can feed off and who can feed off each other."

When putting together a track, lyrics and themes are important, he says, but you've first got to catch a listener's ear with a melody or a beat. To create that beat, he either starts from scratch or builds on something he heard on an old recording, which he did when he worked a few seconds of Leon Haywood's "I Want'a Do Something Freaky to You" into "Nuthin' but." He used a piano riff from Joe Cocker's "Woman to Woman" to jump-start "California Love," the spectacular 1996 single he made with the late Tupac Shakur.

On "California Love," Dre went into the studio in his former Chatsworth home and played a sample from the Cocker single over a drum beat. He then had some horn players come in to fill out the sound and finally stacked some strings on top.

While recording the track, Dre remembered a festive line -- "California knows how to party" -- from another song ("West Coast Poplock") and he brought in Roger Troutman, from the old Zapp band, to deliver the vocal line on the record.

As Dre recounts the process, you can imagine his head racing through ideas with the speed of a computer. Does this work? What else can I do? What's missing? Is that too much? Seeing him amid his arsenal of state-of-the-art equipment brings home the complexity of his approach.

But everything he does is rooted in the age-old search for a hook. In looking for musical ideas, Dre sometimes goes randomly through crates of old records to see if anything catches his ear, something as short as five to 10 seconds of music. Most of the time, however, he'll sit in the studio with a couple of other musicians and simply start playing, hoping one of them will come up with a key riff. Dre usually sits at a synthesizer or drum machine, joined by, say, a bassist and/or guitarist.

"It's great when everybody is working together and feels something is happening," he says about his time in the studio. "That's when it's all smiles in the studio. You don't want to see any clock or any daylight or hear any phone. You just cut yourself off from the rest of the world and make music.

"I don't necessarily even call it work. I call it fun. I even like the pressure, it makes me work all the harder if I know people out there are waiting for the record."

The quality Dre looks for in a recording artist is uniqueness -- a distinct voice that will stand out from the crowd. Sometimes the writing will catch Dre's ear, other times the rap delivery.

Dre's biggest star, Eminem, came from as far out in left field as Snoop Dogg. An intern at Interscope Records had heard Eminem on an L.A. radio show and passed a tape along to Interscope's Iovine, who in turn played it for Dre.

Dre was so excited that he got together with Eminem the next day. He was surprised to see that the young artist was white, which might have led some industry figures to think twice, given the bad name Vanilla Ice gave white rappers. But Dre swears -- holding his hand up playfully as if testifying -- he knew that Eminem had the goods.

"His writing is like no other," Dre says, "the way he puts together certain words and the way he makes certain words rhyme that to me most of the time don't even seem like they are supposed to rhyme. I also loved the fact that Eminem, I think, was setting out to be shocking. I love it as dark as it can get, and I thought the public would feel the same way."

In turn, Eminem has been lavish in his praise for the producer. "Dre showed me how to do things with my voice that I didn't know I could do," Eminem told me early in his career, such as "the way to deliver rhymes. . . . I'd do something I thought was pretty good, and he'd say, 'I think you can do it better.' "

It was Eminem who introduced Dre to 50 Cent, whose first three Aftermath albums have sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. "I loved his delivery more than anything," says Dre, who produced two tracks on 50 Cent's latest CD. "He had so much authority and strength in his voice."

When it came to the Game, the Compton rapper who has become another multimillion-album seller, Dre heard something in the rapper's raw voice that reminded him of the N.W.A days. The Game's Aftermath debut, "The Documentary," was produced by Dre and 50 Cent, and it has sold more than 2.5 millioncopies in the U.S., but the Game has moved onto Interscope's sister label Geffen after a nasty, public feud with 50 Cent. There has been much speculation in hip-hop that the Game was shifted to Geffen after Dre picked 50 Cent, the larger seller, but he denies it.

"I told them, 'I love working with both you guys. I don't have a problem with either of you,' " he says. "It was more like what is going to be the best move under the circumstances. I don't even remember who came up with the idea of putting Game on Geffen, but it was absolutely not me picking 50 over him."

A little heavy lifting

DRE made a rare public appearance this month when he announced the video of the year winner on the MTV Video Music Awards telecast in Las Vegas.

For fans, the appearance was notable for two things: Dre didn't give a release date for "Detox," renewing fears that the album may be lost in some twi- light zone, and his arms and chest were notably buff.

"That's another of my obsessions," he says a few days later of the new look. "I go in the gym two to 2 1/2 hours Monday through Friday. It makes me feel better and look better."

Before Dre started on the weights about four years ago, he often went out drinking and eating after leaving the studio at night, and his weight swelled to 270 pounds. It's back to 220, and he has cut his body fat from 29% to around 6%. Playfully pumping his arms, he says, "I feel like I can kick a brick wall down now."

And what about the album release date?

"I was really hoping to have it out this year, but it's going to have to be pushed back a while because of some other things I've got to work on," he continues, sitting in the lounge of the recording studio where he spends all those hours behind the buttons. He's still two or three tracks away from calling it finished, he says.

Any second thoughts about "Detox" being his final solo album? No, he says emphatically. "I think it's time to move on," he adds, calling rap performing "a young man's game."

More important, the move will free him to pursue his long-standing interest in films. He has signed a multiyear production pact with New Line Cinema. Dre, who will team with director Philip G. Atwell, is also interested in scoring films and eventually directing.

But he expects recording studios to continue to be the center of his world, and he's optimistic.

"When I think of the future, I think a lot of Quincy Jones and how he is an inspiration," Dre says. "Look at the quality of his work over so many years. He didn't even make his best record, 'Thriller,' until he was 50.

"That gives me something to look forward to. Nothing pulls you back into the studio more than the belief that your best record is still ahead."
« Last Edit: November 14, 2007, 01:02:40 PM by Dre-Day »
 

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #53 on: November 14, 2007, 01:06:55 PM »
and the interview with GQ Magazine ( the scans aren't mine; credit goes to Misterx from aftermathmusic.com):












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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #54 on: November 14, 2007, 03:47:23 PM »
now that you're posting all these interviews here, i might as well post the more recent interviews:

Quote
The studio-obsessed producer has left his mark on Eminem and 50 Cent, to name-drop a few. And he's not about to rush his final solo CD.

By Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
September 23, 2007


"We go until it happens," rap producer Dr. Dre says about all the time he spends in the recording studio searching for hits, once as long as 79 hours in a single stretch. "When the ideas are coming," says the man who is one of the half-dozen most influential producers of the modern pop era, "I don't stop until the ideas stop because that train doesn't come along all the time."

Some hip-hop fans, however, must be wondering if this particular train isn't off the track. Dre (real name: Andre Young) has been working on his third solo album, "Detox," for nearly eight years, a time frame that invites uncomfortable comparison with such earlier pop music train wrecks as Phil Spector, Brian Wilson and Axl Rose. All three were fabulously successful artists who found it so hard to live up to their own expectations that they each ran into creative paralysis.

But there are differences between Dre and the others, he and those close to him say. The 42-year-old Compton native hasn't just been working on his own album all these years.

As a producer and head of Aftermath Entertainment, Dre has also contributed to albums by Eminem, 50 Cent, the Game and others. Plus, he has "mixed" tracks -- fine-tuning the musical dynamics -- for more than a dozen other artists, including Gwen Stefani, Eve and Mary J. Blige.

Dre will now devote two months to working on Eminem's new album. "We'll be trying to get his thing done and work on a few things on my own project," Dre says.

It's an exhausting pace and it's possible only because of what Dre calls his obsession with the studio.

To achieve his level of success -- Dre has put his seductive hip-hop stamp on albums that have taken in more than $1 billion worldwide -- you obviously need musical talent.

"Dre is 'the Natural,' " says Interscope Records chief Jimmy Iovine. "Lots of producers have hits, but he does far more than that. He's a creator who has moved popular culture three times . . . with gangsta rap, G-funk and Eminem."

Yet the more you talk to Dre, the more you realize that another key element has been a mental toughness that enabled him to walk away from fast-lane excesses and a runaway ego.

Dre's greatest gift, in fact, may be the strong will that has helped him to recognize the most important things in his life -- the recording studio, his family and, most recently, weight training -- and strip away everything that doesn't serve those priorities.

In the early '90s, Dre was being hailed as the new king of hip-hop for defining gangsta rap with N.W.A and then expanding rap's mainstream appeal with the alluring G-funk style that combined melodic, old-school R&B and hard-core hip-hop sensibilities.

But amid the sudden fame, Dre appeared to be spending as much time partying and in court as he did in the studio. The turning point came after he served time in jail in 1995 for violating the probation he received after breaking another rap producer's jaw in 1992.

He jettisoned the bad behavior and, among other things, severed ties with trouble-plagued Death Row Records, signing a multimillion-dollar deal with Interscope Records and the Universal Music Group that resulted in Dre's Aftermath label.

The accompanying hoopla and dollar signs led to another hazardous period. After closing the deal, Dre went on a signing spree, convinced he could turn out hits with virtually anyone. He admits the move took a personal and professional toll.

"When we started Aftermath, we had something like 20 artists and it was driving me crazy," the 6-foot-1 producer said on the patio of his English-style country estate in the West San Fernando Valley. "I couldn't sit down and focus on any of it, plus it was doubly hard because you ended up crushing these people's dreams when you had to let them go."

On the strength of his name, "Dr. Dre Presents . . . The Aftermath," a 1996 album, was certified platinum (1 million sold), but it had little lasting effect. The humbling experience taught Dre that even with his talents he, as a producer, needs quality artists and a top support crew to make noteworthy records. Aftermath too went through a stripping back process. Its roster now includes fewer than a dozen artists.

"People are always coming up to me, thinking I've got some magic wand that can make them a star and I want to tell them that no one can do that," he says. "Making hit records is not that easy. But it took me time to realize that myself."

Now, Dre is planning another dramatic move, one designed in part to give him even more time in the studio. The long-awaited "Detox," he says, will be his final solo album.

Though claims of "final albums" have often proved to be as short-lived as farewell tours, you sense a burden lifting as Dre talks about saying good-bye to the solo career. He loves being in the studio, whether working on his songs or someone else's. But he doesn't enjoy the other duties that go along with a solo career, including interviews, live shows and other promotional activities. By eliminating all that, Dre is further sharpening his focus on his studio obsession.

"The actual making of a record is the most exciting part of this business," he says. "I don't make records so I can sit down afterward and listen to them. I make them so other people can sit down and listen to them."

Talk about hits

DRE appears as relaxed as can be on the grounds of his gated mansion on a weekday afternoon, refreshed from a couple of hours at the gym and looking forward to going into the studio later in the day. You'd never know from his easygoing manner that the rap kingpin dislikes interviews so much that this is his first one in three years.

He's a wonderful storyteller who delights in the surprising details behind some of his hits. At the moment, he's in the middle of a story about how he found Snoop Dogg, whose silky vocal style contributed greatly to the G-funk classic, "Nuthin but a 'G' Thang."

Dre was at a bachelor party in the early '90s when he heard Snoop's voice on an amateur tape. He liked the way Snoop rhymed over the beats and invited him into the studio.

"I was mainly interested in how he responded to directions," Dre continues. "That's always an important test with me. Talent gets you in the door, but there are other things I consider, like, 'Do I want to work with this guy? Can we click? Can we laugh and talk in the studio?' If not, I'd rather work with someone else."

Seriously? Would Dre really pass up a sure-fire hit if it was brought into the studio by an absolute jerk?

Dre pauses briefly at the question, then laughs. "Well," he says, finally. "I'd probably take the song and then have him sit out in the lobby while I worked on it."

It's the music that matters

DRE has been talking freely for nearly 90 minutes about the studio. The only pauses are to talk to Nicole, his wife of 11 years, about spending the weekend with their kids at their house in Malibu.

For Dre, spending as much time as possible in the studio is as important as keeping your ears open, a point that leads to the matter of interviews. Nothing personal, he says, they're just another distraction.

Dre was blessed with a gift for music, a mom who encouraged him to pursue that gift rather than gangs and an aunt who just happened to live down the street from another young hip-hop fan, O'Shea Jackson, who adopted the professional name Ice Cube.

"I always loved the way music made me feel," Dre says, sipping water from a bottle. "I did sports at school and all, but when I got home, it was just music. Everybody in my neighborhood loved music. I could jump the back fence and be in the park where there were ghetto blasters everywhere."

By the time Dre and Ice Cube hooked up in the mid-'80s, both had spent countless hours honing their skills. Dre, four years older, was a master of turntables, his confidence boosted by all the nights he played records for the dance crowd at the Eve After Dark nightclub in Compton. Cube's forte was lyrics.

After they joined N.W.A, Dre supplied the sonic explosiveness, while Cube wrote the key raps for "Straight Outta Compton," the alternately angry and witty late-'80s album that made gangsta rap a sensation. The success of N.W.A showed Dre the importance of following your instincts and not worrying about the latest trends.

"I mean, think about it," he says. "We couldn't have done anything more unlikely in music business terms. We were making a record that we knew no one would play on the radio because of the language and that no major label would even release."

Dre followed his instincts again with 1992's "The Chronic" by using live instruments when the vogue in rap was building tracks around turntable dynamics and "samples" from old recordings. "There is some sampling on my records and a lot of what I call replays, where I'd have musicians come in the studio and replay the sample from the original record," he says. "But mainly, we'd come up with our own music."

Dre's favorite moment during the making of "The Chronic" may have been the time Snoop Dogg phoned the studio from jail while Dre happened to be working on "Nuthin' but." "I can't even remember why he was in jail, but I thought his voice would be perfect for the song," Dre says, smiling. "So, I told him to stay on the line while I duct-taped the receiver of the phone to the microphone. That's how he did vocal for our demo for ' "G" Thang.' I wish I could find that demo now. You could hear all the jail sounds in the background. It was crazy."

Fifteen years after that recording session, Dre still seems to savor the moment -- as much as the success of the record itself, which was named single of the decade by Spin magazine.

For Dre, a hit record starts with a hit sound, which sounds simple. But the search is what requires those long hours in the studio. The producer normally heads into the studio around 3 p.m. weekdays, the weekends being reserved for the family and for his hobbies, which include sports and photography. Because the studio in Sherman Oaks is like a second home, Dre likes the atmosphere to be as comfortable and relaxed as possible.

"One of the most important things for a producer is to realize you don't know everything," says Dre, whose studio techniques are largely self-taught. "I love having people in the studio that I can feed off and who can feed off each other."

When putting together a track, lyrics and themes are important, he says, but you've first got to catch a listener's ear with a melody or a beat. To create that beat, he either starts from scratch or builds on something he heard on an old recording, which he did when he worked a few seconds of Leon Haywood's "I Want'a Do Something Freaky to You" into "Nuthin' but." He used a piano riff from Joe Cocker's "Woman to Woman" to jump-start "California Love," the spectacular 1996 single he made with the late Tupac Shakur.

On "California Love," Dre went into the studio in his former Chatsworth home and played a sample from the Cocker single over a drum beat. He then had some horn players come in to fill out the sound and finally stacked some strings on top.

While recording the track, Dre remembered a festive line -- "California knows how to party" -- from another song ("West Coast Poplock") and he brought in Roger Troutman, from the old Zapp band, to deliver the vocal line on the record.

As Dre recounts the process, you can imagine his head racing through ideas with the speed of a computer. Does this work? What else can I do? What's missing? Is that too much? Seeing him amid his arsenal of state-of-the-art equipment brings home the complexity of his approach.

But everything he does is rooted in the age-old search for a hook. In looking for musical ideas, Dre sometimes goes randomly through crates of old records to see if anything catches his ear, something as short as five to 10 seconds of music. Most of the time, however, he'll sit in the studio with a couple of other musicians and simply start playing, hoping one of them will come up with a key riff. Dre usually sits at a synthesizer or drum machine, joined by, say, a bassist and/or guitarist.

"It's great when everybody is working together and feels something is happening," he says about his time in the studio. "That's when it's all smiles in the studio. You don't want to see any clock or any daylight or hear any phone. You just cut yourself off from the rest of the world and make music.

"I don't necessarily even call it work. I call it fun. I even like the pressure, it makes me work all the harder if I know people out there are waiting for the record."

The quality Dre looks for in a recording artist is uniqueness -- a distinct voice that will stand out from the crowd. Sometimes the writing will catch Dre's ear, other times the rap delivery.

Dre's biggest star, Eminem, came from as far out in left field as Snoop Dogg. An intern at Interscope Records had heard Eminem on an L.A. radio show and passed a tape along to Interscope's Iovine, who in turn played it for Dre.

Dre was so excited that he got together with Eminem the next day. He was surprised to see that the young artist was white, which might have led some industry figures to think twice, given the bad name Vanilla Ice gave white rappers. But Dre swears -- holding his hand up playfully as if testifying -- he knew that Eminem had the goods.

"His writing is like no other," Dre says, "the way he puts together certain words and the way he makes certain words rhyme that to me most of the time don't even seem like they are supposed to rhyme. I also loved the fact that Eminem, I think, was setting out to be shocking. I love it as dark as it can get, and I thought the public would feel the same way."

In turn, Eminem has been lavish in his praise for the producer. "Dre showed me how to do things with my voice that I didn't know I could do," Eminem told me early in his career, such as "the way to deliver rhymes. . . . I'd do something I thought was pretty good, and he'd say, 'I think you can do it better.' "

It was Eminem who introduced Dre to 50 Cent, whose first three Aftermath albums have sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. "I loved his delivery more than anything," says Dre, who produced two tracks on 50 Cent's latest CD. "He had so much authority and strength in his voice."

When it came to the Game, the Compton rapper who has become another multimillion-album seller, Dre heard something in the rapper's raw voice that reminded him of the N.W.A days. The Game's Aftermath debut, "The Documentary," was produced by Dre and 50 Cent, and it has sold more than 2.5 millioncopies in the U.S., but the Game has moved onto Interscope's sister label Geffen after a nasty, public feud with 50 Cent. There has been much speculation in hip-hop that the Game was shifted to Geffen after Dre picked 50 Cent, the larger seller, but he denies it.

"I told them, 'I love working with both you guys. I don't have a problem with either of you,' " he says. "It was more like what is going to be the best move under the circumstances. I don't even remember who came up with the idea of putting Game on Geffen, but it was absolutely not me picking 50 over him."

A little heavy lifting

DRE made a rare public appearance this month when he announced the video of the year winner on the MTV Video Music Awards telecast in Las Vegas.

For fans, the appearance was notable for two things: Dre didn't give a release date for "Detox," renewing fears that the album may be lost in some twi- light zone, and his arms and chest were notably buff.

"That's another of my obsessions," he says a few days later of the new look. "I go in the gym two to 2 1/2 hours Monday through Friday. It makes me feel better and look better."

Before Dre started on the weights about four years ago, he often went out drinking and eating after leaving the studio at night, and his weight swelled to 270 pounds. It's back to 220, and he has cut his body fat from 29% to around 6%. Playfully pumping his arms, he says, "I feel like I can kick a brick wall down now."

And what about the album release date?

"I was really hoping to have it out this year, but it's going to have to be pushed back a while because of some other things I've got to work on," he continues, sitting in the lounge of the recording studio where he spends all those hours behind the buttons. He's still two or three tracks away from calling it finished, he says.

Any second thoughts about "Detox" being his final solo album? No, he says emphatically. "I think it's time to move on," he adds, calling rap performing "a young man's game."

More important, the move will free him to pursue his long-standing interest in films. He has signed a multiyear production pact with New Line Cinema. Dre, who will team with director Philip G. Atwell, is also interested in scoring films and eventually directing.

But he expects recording studios to continue to be the center of his world, and he's optimistic.

"When I think of the future, I think a lot of Quincy Jones and how he is an inspiration," Dre says. "Look at the quality of his work over so many years. He didn't even make his best record, 'Thriller,' until he was 50.

"That gives me something to look forward to. Nothing pulls you back into the studio more than the belief that your best record is still ahead."

+1

for this one man. really good shit

-T

 
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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #55 on: November 14, 2007, 08:08:58 PM »


Quote
"When I think of the future, I think a lot of Quincy Jones and how he is an inspiration," Dre says. "Look at the quality of his work over so many years. He didn't even make his best record, 'Thriller,' until he was 50.

"That gives me something to look forward to. Nothing pulls you back into the studio more than the belief that your best record is still ahead."
Damn!!!!!
It ain't happenin, Bibles I'm still packin them
And jackin demons wit them 44 magnums" T-Bone

 

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #56 on: November 16, 2007, 01:11:55 PM »
Quote
Then I came back because doing records with Dre is like going to school, because if you sit and you watch, and you look and you learn, the guy is teaching you how to make great records. Now with this new record I made, I'm only doing what Dre would have did, and I used my own judgment. 

ThaFormula.com - Sometimes we sit around and think about what you and Dre would have come out with after "No One Can Do It Better" if it weren't for that damn accident...

D.O.C. - Ahh man, that would have been the shit! It would have been the shit, but I would have had to probably fight with Dre a lot because I don't think he was really interested in the direction that I wanted to go in. He was only interested in making party songs that muthafuckas wanna get drunk and dance to.

ThaFormula.com - What were you trying to get into?

D.O.C. - Well like I said, I used to be a church kid. Like when you get this record, you will feel it. It's god in my record and its a gang of nigga shit. It's a gang of old N.W.A. shit. When muthafuckas hear this record, their first comment is that they knew I was where all of the old N.W.A. shit came from. That's everybody's first word. So it's dirty in that sense, but there are bits and pieces where I'm rappin' myself for like little soliloquies and it's a trip. It will make you cry, it will make you laugh, it will make you mad, it will make you wanna drive fast and then it will make you wanna get drunk. This album is a trip.



ThaFormula.com - So how did it happen Doc, to where you had no involvement in Death Row business wise?

D.O.C. - Shortly after I had that accident, I started fucking with drugs. That's when I first started doing ecstasy. That was way back in '89. I started trying other things and it got to be a way for me to escape that pain. The white people at the top in the big offices, the ones with all the money, they were really only interested in Dre and Snoop. That shit got to be sort of painful even though they needed me to come and sign papers to get things done. It just started to feel like I was slippin', so I started getting more fucked up. I still seemed to make it to the muthafuckin' studio everyday and put my work in, but the more I fell, the more I slipped into that hole. These other guys, the more they started to rise up, nobody reached down to pick me up you know.




 Anyway, after we all came together and started this Death Row shit, I started sinkin' and they started rising. I started losing control, and they started going to meetings without me. I got to give these guys credit to say that they had enough respect for me to where they thought that I was in complete control and knew what I was doing. I fucked up a lot of Dr. Dre's parties and business meetings that I would go to fucked up and nobody still wouldn't say shit to me. They wouldn't say, "Hey Doc, you can't do this or take this muthafucka home. None of that shit. I'd be the only muthafucka in there drunk, "walkin' around with a sawed off shot gun and no shirt on." Threatening everybody and would nobody say shit to me man. So I'm just out there and I can understand to a certain extent why they would be like, "man we gotta handle our business." I ain't fittin' to let this muthafucka fuck mine off. But when I first started making this attempt to come back, none of those guys reached out to really help me and they had their own issues at the time, and I don't look for no nigga to help me because I could make it happen. But none of those guys really felt bad about none of my situations, except for Nate Dogg, let me take that lie back. Nate Dogg was the one person who continually through those seven years, always had great empathy for my situation and always told me that.



 Well now after ten years, I finally got enough air back in my balls where I feel like talkin' and trust me when you hear this record, your gonna be like man! Matter of fact there is shit on this record that is so dirty, I know these muthafuckas are gonna be comin at me like, "Nigga how you gonna say some shit like that, hell naw get that off the shelf. You're ruining our kids. When they come at me with that conversation, watch how cool, calm, and collective as I sit back and converse with these folks. Oh, I got they ass. They fucked up( Laughs).

ThaFormula.com - Now let's get into the Chronic. You were in the "Nuthin' but a G Thang" video and everything seemed great at Death Row. Was it?

D.O.C. - Yeah, everything was great at that time.  I still didn't have anything of my own but I was staying at Dre's house and I had no money of my own, but I could ask Dre for 5 grand at any time and get it.  Matter of fact, I used to ask Dre for 5 grand every 3 or 4 days for about 2 years and would get it and then go spend it up on dope.  I don't know if Dre knew, but how could you not know?




ThaFormula.com - After the first Chronic dropped, did you see things starting to come to an end or not?

D.O.C. - Oh sure I did.  See the shit that they were doing was unnecessary and sooner or later that shit is gonna catch up.  The drug shit had started to get kind of old.  In '94, I asked Dre what's up with me rappin'. I had written a song and he said you should let me put that on this next record and it really pissed me off because nobody was really givin' a fuck about me.  I told him what about me muthafucka, I wanna rap to.  I wanted to do something, but they had regulated me to comic relief.  I'm a damn fool anyway.  I'm a natural comedian so that's what I had been regulated to.  I was the comic relief on the album. 

ThaFormula.com - So Dre said no about you rappin then?

D.O.C. - He didn't think that you could make a good record with this voice.  So that's when I left out of there.  See me and Dre is like a big brother, little brother thing and when the big brother piss his little brother off, then his little brother is gonna number one, take his shit and run with it, which I did.  "Heltah Skeltah" was really a Dr. Dre record that he was starting to plan on working on that I had actually already started writing lyrics for, and one of the songs that he was trying to takeaway from me was a song that he wanted to put on "Heltah Skeltah."  So I was like "fuck this shit," went to Atlanta and recorded the album.

ThaFormula.com - When you look back at that album now, what are your thoughts on it?

D.O.C. - I think that the album was as far as hip-hop records are concerned not a great record.  There is merit to the record because of who it is and because of the shit the dude done went through trying to get his shit done, but I didn't go buy it.  I'll put it to you like that and if I wouldn't go buy it then it ain't really happening.

ThaFormula.com - Do you think it was a mistake when you look back at it now?

D.O.C. - Hell nah, I needed money.  I had no money.





ThaFormula.com - When exactly did you leave to do “Heltah Skeltah?”

D.O.C. - I left L.A. at the end of ‘94 because I wanted to rap and Dre didn't see it.

ThaFormula.com - Do you agree with Dre now when you look back at how things turned out with that project?

D.O.C. - Well that's a yes and a no answer, because if you’re Dr. Dre you can take “twiddle dee” and make a hit record. You’re Dr. Dre god dammit! There’s nothing that you can't do in a studio, so if it was in your heart to make a hit record on me, you would have done it. You would have found some kind of way to do it. When you think of the old D.O.C., it's probably best to leave it like that, but you know when you think about D.O.C. the person, the man that's still breathin’ right now, still has music in his soul that he has to get up out of him, then you want him to get that shit out.


well i'm glad the D.O.C. stole some skeleton beats from dre; otherwise those would have been put in dre's vault. maybe the D.O.C. made a mistake, when he tried to sound like the "old" D.O.C. , because that flow didn't work out well for his voice. but his voice fits the concept of the helter skelter album perfectly; that's why i agree with him that it was not a mistake to release the album. though the D.O.C. called "his" 3rd album Deuce; that sounds to me that he's not satisfied with the quality of helter skelter.
sure it's good to reflect your old work, but the D.O.C. put the helter skelter project together with the best tools he had at the time. i mean, the album would not be released on death row, and there was no way Dre was going to be involved in the process. (that's why i don't agree with the choice the D.O.C. made for the name of his 3rd album; he shouldn't have referred to the 2nd album).

but it's good to see that the D.O.C. won't stop rapping; on Deuce you could already hear a preview of his "new" flow. just because it's different, doesn't mean it's bad (although he had such a powerful voice before the accident; no wonder he called himself the kid with the golden voice) it's not like he's dead. I'm really looking forward to Voice Threw Hot Vessels
« Last Edit: November 16, 2007, 01:29:39 PM by Dre-Day »
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #57 on: November 17, 2007, 05:04:15 AM »
^^^^
Hell yeah,even tho Helter Skelter is on some totally different shit than No One Can Do It Better,I love it.
[The Helter Skelter concept and dark production fits his "new" voice.
The Deuce was supposed to be a 6-2 solo,,,
« Last Edit: November 17, 2007, 10:00:06 AM by Chadrick »
 

Tha Psycho Hustla

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #58 on: November 17, 2007, 05:52:08 AM »
man after hearin all that shit, i dont have no sympathy for dre.
that guy is fucked up.c´mon.fuck him.im not hatin on him but, he aint down with the homies, why he didnt help doc?or let him rap on the chronic?everybody saw it that it worked even with his fucked up voice.
 

Dre-Day

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #59 on: November 17, 2007, 09:57:52 AM »
Quote

Dubcnn: Why do that, though? I'm sure he's got beats that he's not happy with that he could easily slang to up and coming artists who would appreciate them.

I know, dogg! I be thinking the same thing! Cause he just makes them all day, he spits them out! But it's his art, I can't tell him what to do with his shit. I don't even try, cause it won't work!

Quote
The one thing that Dr. Dre is missing now is D.O.C. and that's the same way that I would tell those young guys, hey that sucks!  I would tell Dre's big ass the same shit. Hey, I love you, and your the greatest of all time, but that's bullshit!

ThaFormula.com - So at this point in time there is nobody in there to tell him, "Hey Dre, I don't know about that beat right there?"

D.O.C. - That's right. Number one, there is nobody there that I think, and this is just my own personal humble opinion, there's nobody there that I think knows the difference between a hit record, or not, and even if they knew, they're going to get paid so they're not gonna tell him. Me, I never gave a fuck. You muthafuckas ain't payin' me anyway, so I might as well tell you your shit stinks.


ThaFormula.com - Now back to what you were tellin’ me about the “2001” album because it got me a little curious when you said it wasn't that fun recording that album...

D.O.C. - Nah, because I kept getting into it with Dre's people. His entourage, his group of people that worked at Aftermath and the people that he had around him in the studio are all a bunch of ball lickers, and if your gonna suck nuts and you’re around me then be aware that I'm gonna tell you that your a dick sucka!(Laughs) Dre has surrounded himself with a lot of non-Dre's. See nobody is pushing Dre to make great records right now. No matter what anybody says hip-hop is always who's better then who, and if nobody is pushing Dre to be better, then what the fuck has he got to do? Everything he does is cool cause nobody is doing anything better. But you wait till this record comes out. He's fittin’ to have to pull something out of that god damn bag. He's talkin’ about workin’ on a record called “Detox” he told me. Well he's gonna have to bring something other then that same ‘ol shit he's been doing if he think he's fittin’ to move the crowd now.


lol, dre should just rank his own beats, put them in different categories and sell at a price that fits the quality according to him  ;) i mean, just because he thinks it's not good enough, doesn't mean it's a bad track. he has probably thrown a few thousand beats away by now.

by the way, i hope the D.O.C. is going to use those Deuce leftovers; he could use them for a real Six-Two soloalbum(or mixtape).

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #60 on: November 26, 2007, 10:02:10 AM »
RBX: Still Droppin’ Bombs ...allhiphop interview
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=160333.0
AllHipHop.com: You were introduced to the world via The Chronic, has there been any talk about you appearing on Detox?

RBX: Yes there has. I am in the dark about the record just like everyone else. I had a conversation with one of my folks and they said that Dre is not complete on who he is going to have on it; he is still digging through some of the songs he has, but maybe I will make it. I don’t know yet. We are going to have to wait and see. Dre is so picky that one week you might be on there and the next week you are not, so you just have to wait till it comes out to see.

For rest of the RBX interview hit this link;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=160333.0
 

Tha Psycho Hustla

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #61 on: December 10, 2007, 11:57:00 AM »
thx 4 these.
can up the dre-interview from HQ as a big pciture?cuz i cant read it so.it would be dope as fuck.
 

LongBeachsFinest

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #62 on: December 10, 2007, 02:35:21 PM »
i wonder why they didnt keep the dre verse on where im from!?


"i was ultimate warrior to you bully ass niggas, i will come through the hood with the fully ask niggas"
 

GATMAN

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #63 on: December 10, 2007, 03:12:45 PM »
This is a good thread.  Wish Nwa can come back out.   Dre, Ice Cube, Mc Ren, Yella





www.myspace.com/djbutter
 

HEC

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #64 on: December 12, 2007, 10:20:44 AM »
great stuff Chad, 1990 was the year that I started to really get into hiphop so these reviews are great, btw I don't think you want to know who my favorite artists were in '90  ;D
 

HEC

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #65 on: December 12, 2007, 10:52:57 AM »
great stuff Chad, 1990 was the year that I started to really get into hiphop so these reviews are great,
btw I don't think you want to know who my favorite artists were in '90  ;D

MC Hammer or Vanilla Ice?  :laugh:

LOL I started off with Hammer in early '90 and then when Vanilla came out I jumped on the bandwagon, luckily the next year I go into NWA when their album came out I think it was in May of '91 but before that I was a pop rap fan ;D
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #66 on: December 12, 2007, 11:12:12 AM »
great stuff Chad, 1990 was the year that I started to really get into hiphop so these reviews are great,
btw I don't think you want to know who my favorite artists were in '90  ;D

MC Hammer or Vanilla Ice?  :laugh:

LOL I started off with Hammer in early '90 and then when Vanilla came out I jumped on the bandwagon,
luckily the next year I go into NWA when their album came out I think it was in May of '91 but before that I was a pop rap fan ;D

I think pop rap has been the entry level to "real" rap for a lot of people.
The first Hip Hop records I bought was;
Break Machine

Break Machine - street dance
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/rGkIUlYEQT8&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/rGkIUlYEQT8&amp;rel</a>

Rock Steady Crew - Uprock
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/L3nYYXyTHmw&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/L3nYYXyTHmw&amp;rel</a>

^^^^^I don´t have any bad feelings for these records,  :laugh: :laugh:
yes they´re corny but they got me into Soul Sonic Force and rest of the old school legends.  ;D


 

HEC

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #67 on: December 12, 2007, 11:31:12 AM »
^^
very true classics indeed, I wonder what today's youth's introduction to rap is?
 

Dre-Day

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #68 on: December 12, 2007, 11:33:29 AM »
NWA; Straight Outta Compton review Hip Hop Connection October 1989 NO.9
Hiphop connection was really hating on NWA; the reviewer couldn't see through the controversy and figure out what NWA's message was behind each song.

by way, chad, check your inbox please  ;)

Tha Psycho Hustla

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #69 on: December 12, 2007, 11:34:27 AM »
thx 4 these.
can up the dre-interview from HQ as a big pciture?cuz i cant read it so.it would be dope as fuck.

? which one is that? is it one I have posted?

yes, of course, the latest one where he is asked about eazy and detox.
 

HEC

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #70 on: December 12, 2007, 11:36:50 AM »
NWA; Straight Outta Compton review Hip Hop Connection October 1989 NO.9
Hiphop connection was really hating on NWA; the reviewer couldn't see through the controversy and figure out what NWA's message was behind each song.

by way, chad, check your inbox please  ;)

doesn't HHC have a history of unfavorable west coast reviews? I may be wrong but that is the impression I get for some reason
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #71 on: December 12, 2007, 11:56:45 AM »
^^
very true classics indeed, I wonder what today's youth's introduction to rap is?

Today´s pop rap is a little different than back in 84 and 90.
It´s probably cats that run the pop charts at the time....
Maybe you should do a thread about it? There´s alot of young cats here.... ;)
 

Chad Vader

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #72 on: December 12, 2007, 12:06:31 PM »
NWA; Straight Outta Compton review Hip Hop Connection October 1989 NO.9
Hiphop connection was really hating on NWA; the reviewer couldn't see through the controversy and figure out what NWA's message was behind each song.

by way, chad, check your inbox please  ;)

doesn't HHC have a history of unfavorable west coast reviews?
I may be wrong but that is the impression I get for some reason


They do,however before the gangster rap/west coast rap backlash around the end of 1990,they gave these records rave reviews.
If you remember our convo about "Niggaz4Life",you´ll probably remember all the drama around gangster rap at the time.
They hated on Niggaz4Life,Gave Ren´s Shock Of The Hour 1,yes I said 1,The Chronic got 3.
I will posts these reviews......  ;)
 

HEC

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Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #73 on: December 12, 2007, 12:23:13 PM »
^^
very true classics indeed, I wonder what today's youth's introduction to rap is?

Today´s pop rap is a little different than back in 84 and 90.
It´s probably cats that run the pop charts at the time....
Maybe you should do a thread about it? There´s alot of young cats here.... ;)

good idea
NWA; Straight Outta Compton review Hip Hop Connection October 1989 NO.9
Hiphop connection was really hating on NWA; the reviewer couldn't see through the controversy and figure out what NWA's message was behind each song.

by way, chad, check your inbox please  ;)

doesn't HHC have a history of unfavorable west coast reviews?
I may be wrong but that is the impression I get for some reason


They do,however before the gangster rap/west coast rap backlash around the end of 1990,they gave these records rave reviews.
If you remember our convo about "Niggaz4Life",you´ll probably remember all the drama around gangster rap at the time.
They hated on Niggaz4Life,Gave Ren´s Shock Of The Hour 1,yes I said 1,The Chronic got 3.
I will posts these reviews......  ;)


will check it out, thanks
 

TRG

Re: Dr.Dre Magazine Scans thread. *Interviews,reviews etc.*
« Reply #74 on: December 14, 2007, 07:32:55 AM »
preciate the scans Chad