Author Topic: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*  (Read 9543 times)

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #150 on: April 04, 2008, 08:43:37 AM »
MC Ren
Reviews;



Now for the REAL shock of the hour. HHC gave Renīs album a whooping 1 "mic" out of 5. WTF? Fuck Em!

40 MC Ren; Shock of the hour review Hip Hop Connection



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Hereīs Rap Pages review of The Villian in Black,they gave it 5 out of 10  :P >:(
How is that possible? ....sure we all miss Renīs "old" flow,but that doesnīt mean that his new flow is wak.
263 MC Ren; The Villian in Black review in Rap Pages April 1996



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MC Ren review in The Source July 1998 NO.106



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MC Ren; Ruthless For Life review in Rap Pages August 1998


^^^Looks like I got to re-scan this one  :-\

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http://232 MC Ren; Villian In Black review in The Source May 1996 NO.80.jpg


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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #151 on: April 04, 2008, 08:45:35 AM »
Ice Cube
Interviews




Ice Cube interview in Hip Hop Connection,August 1990. Issue 19. Ice Cube cover 1







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265 Ice Cube interview in Rap Pages March 1994







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304 Ice Cube interview in Rap Pages December 1996





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224 Ice Cube in The Source May 1996 NO.80










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Ice Cube interview 1 Hip Hop Connection January 1992 NO.36




FIXED!



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Ice Cube interview 1 Hip Hop Connection February 1994 NO.60




FIXED!

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Ice Cube interview 1 The Source February 1994 NO.53








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NWA:Ice Cube 1 interview Hip Hop Connection August 1989 NO.7







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westside Connection interview The Source Decemeber 2003 NO.171






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Check this video interview;

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1584508/20080401/story.jhtml

Ice Cube Welcomes MTV To His Home In South Central L.A. -- In 1989 -- In The Loder FilesViews   3,690

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A vintage visit amid the firestorm of controversy that surrounded N.W.A's 'F--- Tha Police.'


When you've been interviewing people for, oh, a hundred years or so, you build up quite a backlog of banter and chat. A lot of this stuff is inevitably ephemeral — the day will surely never come when anyone cares what Vanilla Ice ever had to say about anything. On the other hand, it is kind of interesting to look back on the vintage natterings of people who are still on the scene and still entertaining us, either with their work or with their dotty behavior.

We've been exhuming a ton of this stuff over the last several months — interviews from the vaults going back not only to the early '90s, but even beyond. Most of these ancient tapes are fun in one way or another; some are scary, which is even more fun. We're going to be posting these old interactions every Tuesday from now on, and if some of what you see seems a little silly at times, well, the past is filled with silly things. Much like the present.

N.W.A may not have been the first gangsta-rap act (ask Schoolly D), but they were the most sensational at the time, and probably the most lastingly influential.

Their classic 1989 album, Straight Outta Compton, with seminal beats by Dr. Dre and his partner, DJ Yella, and furious-young-man lyrics by Ice Cube, MC Ren and Eazy-E, was packed with brutal street-gang fantasies, a chillingly ambivalent portrait of a ghetto crack dealer, and bursts of unfortunately prophetic misogyny. The album also contained a broadside against the race-based harassment of black kids by the L.A. police force — a track called "F--- Tha Police" — that was so incendiary ("gonna be a bloodbath of cops dyin' in L.A.") that it drew an angry letter from the FBI, complaining that the lyrics encouraged "violence against and disrespect for the law enforcement officer," and warning N.W.A's record company to "be aware of the FBI's position relative to this song and its message."

Naturally, the album got zero mainstream radio airplay. And the group's live appearances were targeted by a national police faxing campaign, which sometimes resulted in either a refusal by local departments to provide security for N.W.A concerts, or a determination to break the shows up. Despite all this, though, after Straight Outta Compton was released in 1989, it went on to sell a couple of million copies strictly on buzz.



MTV News set up an interview with Ice Cube in September of that year, at his parents' house in Compton, where the 20-year-old rapper was still living. By that time, this L.A. suburb was nationally perceived (thanks in part to N.W.A) as a pretty nasty place. (It's still rated as one of the most dangerous towns in America.) Ice Cube and his folks, however, lived on a deceptively sunny street of tidy houses and neatly mowed lawns. The gangs and guns, Cube said, came out at night. In fact, just recently there'd been a drive-by attack on this very house, which had sent even his father running to grab a weapon. Cube didn't seem particularly worried by this incident, but clearly the self-fueling proliferation of guns hereabouts made daily life a tense business. "I gotta ride around with my stuff now," he said, "just in case they pull up on the side of me."

DJ Yella stopped by to sit in on the interview, and afterwards Cube took us out in his van for a tour of the 'hood. We only saw one gangbanger on the street — a guy perhaps unwisely wearing too much red. Apart from that, however, things seemed quiet. At least nobody pulled up alongside us with a Mack-10 blazing. We never saw the gangs that came out after dark. As veteran white guys, we were gone by then.

Shortly after this interview, Ice Cube left N.W.A in a dispute over money. In 1990, he released the first of three powerful solo albums — records showered with both acclaim (for their music and for Cube's rhyming skills) and condemnation (for their racial and sexual hostility). He's still putting out albums, of course, and in 1991, he launched an acting career with a key role in John Singleton's classic drug-gang movie, "Boyz N the Hood." He's gone on to write, produce or act in a number of hit films, among them "Three Kings," "Barbershop," and a trio of pictures with "Friday" in the title (not to mention his recent turn toward family flicks with "Are We There Yet?" and "Are We Done Yet?").

DJ Yella moved on into movies, too, in a way. Over the years since N.W.A fell apart in 1991, he's been a very busy director of porn films.



^^^^prop Laconic for this one  ;) ^^


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315 Ice Cube interview in Subculture.jpg






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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #152 on: April 04, 2008, 08:47:31 AM »
Ice Cube
Reviews




309 Ice Cube; Peace review in The Source May 2000




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Ice Cube; Death Certificate review Hip Hop Connection December 1991 NO.35



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Ice Cube; Amerikkkas most wanted review in Hip Hop Connection,August 1990. Issue 19. Ice Cube cover




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Ice Cube; Lethal injection review Hip Hop Connection December 1993 NO.58



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Ice Cube review in The Source February 1995 NO.65.



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211 Ice Cube; WAR review in The Source December 1998 NO.111



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321 Ice Cube; War review in Blaze December 1999


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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #153 on: April 04, 2008, 08:49:40 AM »
Eazy-E
interviews




276 Eazy-E interview in Rap Pages February 1993








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282 Eazy-E interview in Rap Pages August 1995










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322 Eazy-E interview in Rap Sheet October 1994






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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #154 on: April 04, 2008, 08:51:01 AM »
DJ Yella
interviews



235 DJ Yella interview in The Source June 1996 NO.81




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289 DJ Yella interview in Rap Pages August 1995






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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #155 on: April 04, 2008, 08:52:49 AM »
NWA interviews;



"NWA" interview in The Source April 2000 NO.127.








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NWA Reunion? in Rap Pages February 1998


















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Ruthless Tenth Anniversary in BillBoard August 9,1997









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Yo props on ALL of them interviews/articles...
it's like the N.W.A library  ;D
Im gonna get some refreshments and have a nice chilled out read 
Legendary mega dope thread.

Maybe I should change the topic title?
Quote
N.W.A library

O.k., I count REN, EAZY, DRE, CUBE, ARABIAN PRINCE, CANDYMAN....
Who are the other 6 dudes. Acts/Friends ?
Anyone know ?

DJ Train,Ren's DJ also the brother of Tootie from the torcha chamber under the A, Chip Ren's ryhme partner standing next to Ren.
Sir Jinx is sitting up there... also the Mexican dude next to Candyman is Crazy D.  Crazy D is also the dude that says, "Yo Mister Dope man, you think you're slick" on the Dopeman song. 
i see rappinstine
http://www.discogs.com/artist/Rappinstine

one of tha members was Sean Barney Thomas, it means hes down since the NWA days, didnt know this!dope!
krazy d was about to release a dvd about "the truth behind NWA and why he didnt stay wit da group".
who else is on the cover?
NWA, jinx,candyman (is it the "knockin da boots" candyman?who johnny "j" produced for?),mc chip,arabian prince
who else?
so Fresh K, Dr Rock, and Doc T arent on there??    Someone write the names next to everyone and post the pic again.    i always thought the guy in the front squatting was DOC all these years...   I have the vinyl and i figured rappenstine was the guy who was no longer covered by the list of names on the cd cover
which guy is sir jinx?

the dude sitting at the top with the big clock....
^^ wasnt ron de vu a group?

whose face is "A" coverin?
whos it witht he green cap?
whos it sittin before mc ren?
whos behind dre?

previous posts in this thread have revealed all of them.... except for the guy behind Dre. That might be someone from C.I.A. ... but if I get the chance to talk to Sir Jinx, I will ask him.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
This is a question that comes up from time to time,so I jacked it from;
NWA & The Posse...Album Cover Question
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=165791.0;topicseen

^^^^^^^^
 prop all them cats  ;)
^^^^^^^^^

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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #156 on: April 04, 2008, 08:54:58 AM »
Video
interviews and
what not




Eazy-E interview Slammin Video Mag Vol.2 1990
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/pTFasAsnWSA&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/pTFasAsnWSA&amp;rel</a>
Download link;
http://www.mediafire.com/?0xmims4j13d

^^^^^^
and the video is up and yes Chad got to be in it  :P :P :P :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



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Here you go Dre-Day; :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/P_1d--yrujU&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/P_1d--yrujU&amp;rel</a>


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Just like Michael Jackson weīre dangerous  :laugh: :laugh:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/7quV0Xyldyo&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/7quV0Xyldyo&amp;rel</a>

^^^^^
Some info to note is;
-Ren working on Kizz my black azz while Dre was still around
-The smiling faces movie


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RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #157 on: April 04, 2008, 08:57:11 AM »
Suge Knight talks shit Part.1; N.W.A reunion. (HHC September 2000)
Here’s a part of a interview in Hip Hop Connection, where he talks shit as always. I took out the most interesting part’s.
Here’s part 1; N.W.A
Quote
Hip Hop Connection. September. 2000. Suge knight Cover;
HHC;
What happened to the Dre and Cube album?
Suge Knight;
“Basically egos, and when you get two guys who are not from the ghetto what can they actually talk about? Their house in the hills?
That’s why you  won’t see the N.W.A album come out any time soon. Everyone’s talking about the N.W.A reunion album coming out, but I own the name N.W.A, so before they put that out I’d have to give clearance for it. They did ‘Chin Check’ on Cube’s album which didn’t help sell the album because the kids want somebody young. What really sold Dre’s album is Eminem, that’s what sold that record”
HHC;
How come you own N.W.A’s name?
Suge Knight;
“The N.W.A thing, that’s a Compton thing. With me really being from Compton and those other guys not really being from Compton, it was more rightfully mine to own than theirs. I wasn’t part of the group but I was part of the real ghetto which those guys weren’t.”
HHC;
Are you saying N.W.A where all fakers?
Suge Knight;
Eazy lived in Compton, that’s the only one, everybody else didn’t.


Here’s a link to another thread where he talks some shit about Snoop and more.
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=132282.0
Here’s a link to another thread where he talks some shit about Ronin Ro;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=132284.0
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #158 on: April 04, 2008, 08:58:08 AM »
Dr.Dre and Ice Cube talks about Helter Skelter in The Source 93,Rap Pages 94 and Hip Hop Connection 94
Quote
The Source September 93 #48
The Source:

Since Dre's break-up with Eazy,there has been speculation about a reunion between he Ice Cube. Dre confirms the rumours. "We planned on doing this a long time ago,but we had to go through all the drama and shit." We got a chance to come together. Everybody's heads are on straight and the offer is,uhh...a nice amount of money." The album is tentatively titled Helter Skelter and will be realeased on Death Row Records. Dre plans to share production duties with Cube's camp. "You Don't Want To See Me" the project's first single,features a guest appearance by George Clinton.


Cube said this in Rap Pages 03.94
RP:What's up with the Helter Skelter project?
Cube:The Helter Skelter project had 2 be put on hold. Now it's about 2 get right back into effect. We had did one record called "You Don't Want To See Me",& we had 2 stop because Dre had to concentrate on Snoop's record.
RP:Is Ren a part of Helter Skelter?
Cube:I don't know,I talk 2 Ren too. That brother signed with the Nation Of Islam. I'm real happy with that brother because he's the last one who I thought would ever change. But I know he's gonna be a strong soldier


Dr.Dre interview in Hip Hop Connection June 1994.
….The much anticipated collaboration with Ice Cube, “Helter Skelter”. “It’s gonna be the biggest rap album of all time,” predicts a confident Dre.
     When it became known that Dre and Cube were going to work together again, rumours started flying round of an N.W.A reunion. Dre is amused at the suggestion.
     “There was never gonna be a N.W.A reunion. It was just me and Cube. We where in an interview clowning around, and that came out and the next thing you know it’s in every fucking newspaper. That the album was gonna be Niggaz Without Eazy. But there was never any reunion planned or nothing like that. We’re gonna try and get Ren on a couple of songs, but there was never any talk of a N.W.A reunion.”
      So despite the exchange of disses back and forth between Dre and Cube over the last couple of years, this obviously hasn’t damaged their working relationship?
       “Me and Cube have always been cool. We said something about him and he came back with his record; but there wasn’t no real beef. As matter of fact, we went out one time and he told me what he was gonna do. I was like ‘okay, whatever’.
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #159 on: April 04, 2008, 08:59:16 AM »
NWA; Straight Outta Compton review Hip Hop Connection October 1989 NO.9
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #160 on: April 04, 2008, 09:32:42 AM »
The best convos/quotes from the previous NWA thread;

hehe thanks for the interviews. lol Ren was obviously pretty emotional, when he said that. cause in more recent interviews he didn't sound so frustrated  ;)
but i think he has a point, whether or not a reunion would be smart, dre's partly to blaim for the reunion not working out. offcourse busy schedules was also a problem ( label politics obviously not, cause, like Yella said, it could have been released independently like the 213 album).
i mean, the d.o.c. managed to get almost every NWA member on one track for the album "Deuce". it's hard to say if they all had enough time to make a full album, but i'm sure there was enough time to do a few more songs ( i wouldn't mind  :laugh: Chin Check was pretty good, and Hello was even better).


thanks for the interviews  :)

Ren talks about a "new" single which also featured Ice Cube, so Ice Cube must have left NWA shortly after this interview( offcourse there is a gap between the moment that the interview takes place and the publishing date of the interview)

i wonder which song he was talking about; was it reused later for the 100 miles and runnin' EP, or is it still unreleased?

where did you see that? I remember Ren or Cube mentioned a track called overnight blackman in one of their interviews.
maybe that is the track i was talking about; anyway, i was referring to the hiphop connection interview with ren--->he mentions "the" song in the description of "if it ain't ruff".


about the Ice cube interview with hiphop connection in 1990; we've already talked about this chad, and you can see that Cube's talking shit.
he was obviously still mad about the money ( even though he wasn't ripped off  :-\), but he  said that at Ruthless they wouldn't allow him to go into a different direction(when it comes to lyrics).
sure, you can see that Ice Cube's first two soloalbums go a step further than straight outta compton, but his statement is false, because i'm quite sure that he would be allowed to take a similar direction with a soloalbum on Ruthless; sure there maybe at least one track with the other NWA members, but that's it--->just check the D.O.C. album.
he can say what he want about Ruthless records, but the label gave you a lot of artistic freedom.
besides, Cube indirectly admitted that his statement was false; in an other interview( can't remember which one) he said that he would still be with ruthless if they offered a better deal.


about the Ice cube interview with hiphop connection in 1990; we've already talked about this chad, and you can see that Cube's talking shit.
he was obviously still mad about the money ( even though he wasn't ripped off  :-\),
but he  said that at Ruthless they wouldn't allow him to go into a different direction (when it comes to lyrics).
sure, you can see that Ice Cube's first two soloalbums go a step further than straight outta compton,but his statement is false,
because I'm quite sure that he would be allowed to take a similar direction with a soloalbum on Ruthless;
sure there maybe at least one track with the other NWA members, but that's it--->just check the D.O.C. album.
he can say what he want about Ruthless records, but the label gave you a lot of artistic freedom.
besides, Cube indirectly admitted that his statement was false; in an other interview( can't remember which one) he said that he would still be with ruthless if they offered a better deal.

If any label gave their artists artistic freedom it was Ruthless,damn go NO further than Shock Of The Hour.
Renīs career could go in another direction if Eazy went in and said;
Yo Ren that shit right there is way too hard,I canīt sell that shit,and made Ren go with some more radio friendly beats and lyrics.
But as you said,we have already discussed the Cube issue.
When the ego gets too big and homeboys "whispering" bullshit in your ear,well then shit gets fucked up.
As Iīm reading the Jerry Heller book,the picture of Suge as a fuckings good manipulator is becoming clearer and clearer....
"whispering" all that bullshit in D.O.Cīs ears that D.O.C "whispered" to Dre and rest of them cats.  >:( >:(
I assume it was easy to manipulate D.O.C after the accident that lead to his drinking and heavy drug use....  :-\ :-\
Damn.....



about that last Eazy-E interview, you can see that the beef with Dre highly influenced his answers, cause that claim about production credit is just bullshit. for example, with Approach to Danger, it was really Dre & Yella handling the production ( check out the video that was on the greatest hits bonus dvd); Eazy-E gave some tips--> so it was right that he was credited only as an executive producer for the niggaz4life album.


lol at the death row comments in that NWA reunion article from rap pages  :D

and thanks for that ruthless 10th year anniversary article.
Tomica must be doing something wrong; she mainly blamed the various lawsuits  for the slow progress, but 10 years later, Ruthless records has pretty much disappeared (while the last lawsuit was settled 9 years ago )  ; sad, but true.

If any label gave their artists artistic freedom it was Ruthless,damn go NO further than Shock Of The Hour.
Renīs career could go in another direction if Eazy went in and said;
Yo Ren that shit right there is way too hard,I canīt sell that shit,and made Ren go with some more radio friendly beats and lyrics.
But as you said,we have already discussed the Cube issue.
When the ego gets too big and homeboys "whispering" bullshit in your ear,well then shit gets fucked up.
As Iīm reading the Jerry Heller book,the picture of Suge as a fuckings good manipulator is becoming clearer and clearer....
"whispering" all that bullshit in D.O.Cīs ears that D.O.C "whispered" to Dre and rest of them cats.  >:( >:(
I assume it was easy to manipulate D.O.C after the accident that lead to his drinking and heavy drug use....  :-\ :-\
Damn.....
must overlooked your comment, cause i haven't read this before  :laugh:
the rap industry really misses a label with a structure like ruthless right now.
yeah, that story about Suge is awful; it's crazy how much influence he had.

by the way, have you read that part about the D.O.C's voice recovery yet? it gave a whole different view about the situation. i always thought that there was never a possibility that D.O.C. would almost completely get his "old" voice back. but Jerry's story seems to suggest the opposite ( well in theory offcourse); with some sort of therapy it could have happened( but he said that the D.O.C. didn't show up when he had an appointment).
if that's true, i'm not blaming the D.O.C. for that, since he was in some deep shit back then, and lived a dangerous lifestyle( thank god he's still alive; like he said himself, it could have gone worse.


lol at the death row comments in that NWA reunion article from rap pages  :D

What did it say? I need to re-read that shit (later)

Tomica must be doing something wrong; she mainly blamed the various lawsuits  for the slow progress, but 10 years later, Ruthless records has pretty much disappeared (while the last lawsuit was settled 9 years ago )  ; sad, but true.

Some shady shit must have went down hhhhmmmm  :-\
Fuck,Above The Law or Yella sholuld be the ones to carry on the legacy.
Shit is history now,Ruthless is dead. Tomica should just let the former artists buy their old masters,so they can release all the unreleased shit thatīs in the vaults. Like all the leftover tracks from the niggaz4Life sessions...

by the way, have you read that part about the D.O.C's voice recovery yet? it gave a whole different view about the situation.
I always thought that there was never a possibility that D.O.C. would almost completely get his "old" voice back.
but Jerry's story seems to suggest the opposite ( well in theory offcourse);
with some sort of therapy it could have happened( but he said that the D.O.C. didn't show up when he had an appointment).
if that's true, i'm not blaming the D.O.C. for that, since he was in some deep shit back then, and lived a dangerous lifestyle
(thank god he's still alive; like he said himself, it could have gone worse.

Yep,I have read it....
Iīm pissed,like Eazy said in one of his comments about Jerry;
Them dum fucks was caught up with "The Jews is always robbing the black man" bullshit..  :P :-X :-\
Ok,they was young,but how ignorant can you be?
Dangerous lifestyle? Heavy drinking and coke? or hanging with dum fucks like Suge?  :laugh: :laugh: ;) ;)



What did it say? I need to re-read that shit (later)

lol not much, but the magazine was comparing some death row artists/inmates, how their career was with dre, and without dre. with michelle for example, “with dre”, the comment was: godfather of hiphop soul; career without dre: now resides in a rest home called death row records.
Death Row Records( referring to Suge Knight I guess?)--> career with dre: over 100 millions served. Career without dre--> serving 5 to 9 years  :laugh:

Some shady shit must have went down hhhhmmmm  :-\
Fuck,Above The Law or Yella sholuld be the ones to carry on the legacy.
Shit is history now,Ruthless is dead. Tomica should just let the former artists buy their old masters,so they can release all the unreleased shit thatīs in the vaults. Like all the leftover tracks from the niggaz4Life sessions...
yeah, sounds like a good idea. it's such a mess with the masters; ruthless had so many distribution deals in the past.

Yep,I have read it....
Iīm pissed,like Eazy said in one of his comments about Jerry;
Them dum fucks was caught up with "The Jews is always robbing the black man" bullshit..  :P :-X :-\
Ok,they was young,but how ignorant can you be?
Dangerous lifestyle? Heavy drinking and coke? or hanging with dum fucks like Suge?  :laugh: :laugh: ;) ;)
Yeah i don’t get it either  :laugh:

He really was mad cause Dre left, i heard they used to be like best friends and shit.

yeah i think they eventually would have worked it out if it weren't for Eazy's death.
and if anybody could bring the NWA members together for a reunion, it would be him.



What did it say? I need to re-read that shit (later)

lol not much, but the magazine was comparing some death row artists/inmates, how their career was with dre, and without dre. with michelle for example, “with dre”, the comment was: godfather of hiphop soul; career without dre: now resides in a rest home called death row records.
Death Row Records( referring to Suge Knight I guess?)--> career with dre: over 100 millions served.
Career without dre--> serving 5 to 9 years  :laugh:

Ohhh that part  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
I would like one with producers;
Yella; MIA
Cold 187; MIA
Daz;  ::)
Colin Wolfe; MIA
Mel-Man; MIA

You get the picture  ;) ;) :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Some shady shit must have went down hhhhmmmm  :-\
Fuck,Above The Law or Yella sholuld be the ones to carry on the legacy.
Shit is history now,Ruthless is dead. Tomica should just let the former artists buy their old masters,so they can release all the unreleased shit thatīs in the vaults. Like all the leftover tracks from the niggaz4Life sessions...

yeah, sounds like a good idea. it's such a mess with the masters; ruthless had so many distribution deals in the past.

Priority,Epic,Atlantic,Giant,Relativity?
Thatīs it right? I guess youīre right....
Cold 187,KMG and/or Ren should get into it,they need some $ right?
or maybe theyīre happy with their job at the local supermarked? :laugh:  :laugh:


Ohhh that part  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
I would like one with producers;
Yella; MIA
Cold 187; MIA
Daz;  ::)
Colin Wolfe; MIA
Mel-Man; MIA
You get the picture  ;) ;) :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
:D they're are all locked in the basement  :laugh:

Priority,Epic,Atlantic,Giant,Relativity?
Thatīs it right? I guess youīre right....
Cold 187,KMG and/or Ren should get into it,they need some $ right?
or maybe theyīre happy with their job at the local supermarked? :laugh:  :laugh:
yeah i guess that are pretty much all the labels ( and the even more fucked up thing is, that some of those labels are owned by bigger labels  ::) )
i don't know if they can make it happen, but maybe if they got good lawyers? they could at least try it. shouldn't be too hard with all the money they earn from their jobs at the local supermarket  :D


i was thinking, why didn't ruthless push Fuck tha police as a single?
i know that there are some similarities with straight outta compton, but the company could have pushed it as a 4th single and shoot a video for it?
financially it wouldn't be a problem, because the total costs for the album were very low anyway.

i'm sure Jerry Heller thought about it. i wonder what made him decide not to push it as a single.
i mean there was so much buzz around that song; Chad i'm sure you've read the stories about the issues that popped up during the NWA tours  ;)

with the FBI letter NWA got a lot of extra promotion, so wouldn't that be a perfect moment to release a video for fuck tha police?
even though i know that the 100 miles and runnin' single was about to be released after the FBI incident.

i mean, Straight outta compton and Fuck tha police are the main songs of the straight outta compton album, so i agree with Ren

Quote
ThaFormula.com - Did you guys know what your were about to do as far as the concepts for the album?

MC Ren - Yeah, if you listen to "Straight Out of Compton," and "Fuck tha Police," them probably the only two on there that's talkin' like serious shit,

NWA even did a part 2 of the song on the 100 miles and runnin' EP


main reason was it was too hard to be a single
even on the edited version of the cd, they redid all the other songs lyrics, but this one song they just had them scratched out.
it would have made a dope video, but back then in rap, you werent going to put money in a video that no one was going to play and that was a video NO ONE would play

if that shit came out today, drop that motherfucker on youtube and watch it create a riot

but 1989 on mtv, hell no.

but that's not the case, because there was a video of the track straight outta compton which was was banned from MTV, and the album went platinum without radioplay.
just check out Jerry's book, where he talks about the promotion and the distribution of the album.


edit: lol at the video, chad  :laugh:



^^^^^
Some info to note is;
-Ren working on Kizz my black azz while Dre was still around

so if they made some tracks together, i take it that those got scrapped just like the dre produced ones for Eazy-E's EP(first named as Temporary insanity, later renamed)?


^^^^^
Some info to note is;
-Ren working on Kizz my black azz while Dre was still around

so if they made some tracks together, i take it that those got scrapped just like the dre produced ones for Eazy-E's EP
(first named as Temporary insanity, later renamed)?

Who knows,this is a little complicated... if you mix in the info from the Jerry Heller book.
Dre is still there,Ren dropping in a "couple" of months...
Deep Cover dropped around the same time as Kizz My Black azz (a couple months before it).
Letīs throw in a wild idea,could this all this be manufactured?


i see what the writer is saying, but i disagree.
while (some) of the beats are slower than the examples he used in his article, i think it would go too far to state that slower beats for the villain in black are a major flaw; it's not really an issue for me, since i think Ren's delivery is still strong. just listen to the great elephant, mad scientist, i don't give a damn, still the same nigga, , keep it real, bitch made nigga killa, bring it on, live from compton saturday night ( almost the entire album, 8 out 10 tracks---> not counting muhammed speaks; to call this a major flaw is clearly an exaggeration).
on niggaz4life Ren was also rapping on some "slower" beats, and his flow was still good.

if the source is already making a big deal out of this, i wonder what they have to say about the D.O.C.'s voice in their review of helter skelter  :-X


from what year is it( i assume it's from 1991)?

Actually I believe itīs 92 around the time Deep Cover dropped or later....
I can try to pin point this with the videoīs that was featured before and after it.
(Remind me if I forget,thereīs some more shit on the same video tape I got up,so will check it again)

Quote from: Dre-Day - Sniper of the Kill Jimmy Iovine Movement link=topic=150824.msg1726477#msg1726477

it's very interesting indeed.
Jerry talked about Dre hanging with Suge, before the Eazy-E set up (from his book).
So i guess Dre was still with ruthless,while he was secretly working on death row?
but if he wanted to keep it low key he wouldn't have worn that hat. so he might have done that on purpose?


NWA interviews,reviews etc.
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=131032.50
Who knows,this is a little complicated... if you mix in the info from the Jerry Heller book.
Letīs throw in a wild idea,could this all this be manufactured?

and to add a little more fire,Yella was there....
heīs also appearing in that interview,he doesnīt really say shit. (some uninteresting shit about pop rappers  :D :laugh:)

yes, please post the other videos as well  :laugh:

so it's from 1992; dre already left ruthless, although Eazy-E didn't have beef with dre yet.  dre was always cool with Ren and Yella, though Yella's appearance on the video is a bit confusing  :laugh:



i see what the writer is saying, but i disagree.
while (some) of the beats are slower than the examples he used in his article, i think it would go too far to state that slower beats for the villain in black are a major flaw; it's not really an issue for me, since i think Ren's delivery is still strong. just listen to the great elephant, mad scientist, i don't give a damn, still the same nigga, , keep it real, bitch made nigga killa, bring it on, live from compton saturday night ( almost the entire album, 8 out 10 tracks---> not counting muhammed speaks; to call this a major flaw is clearly an exaggeration).
on niggaz4life Ren was also rapping on some "slower" beats, and his flow was still good.

if the source is already making a big deal out of this, i wonder what they have to say about the D.O.C.'s voice in their review of helter skelter  :-X


Hereīs Rap Pages review of The Villian in Black,they gave it 5 out of 10  :P >:(
How is that possible? ....sure we all miss Renīs "old" flow,but that doesnīt mean that his new flow is wak.
263 MC Ren; The Villian in Black review in Rap Pages April 1996
lol...... ::)
sometimes i wonder if they've actually heard the same album as we did.





i see what the writer is saying, but i disagree.
while (some) of the beats are slower than the examples he used in his article, i think it would go too far to state that slower beats for the villain in black are a major flaw; it's not really an issue for me, since i think Ren's delivery is still strong. just listen to the great elephant, mad scientist, i don't give a damn, still the same nigga, , keep it real, bitch made nigga killa, bring it on, live from compton saturday night ( almost the entire album, 8 out 10 tracks---> not counting muhammed speaks; to call this a major flaw is clearly an exaggeration).
on niggaz4life Ren was also rapping on some "slower" beats, and his flow was still good.

if the source is already making a big deal out of this, i wonder what they have to say about the D.O.C.'s voice in their review of helter skelter  :-X


Hereīs Rap Pages review of The Villian in Black,they gave it 5 out of 10  :P >:(
How is that possible? ....sure we all miss Renīs "old" flow,but that doesnīt mean that his new flow is wak.
263 MC Ren; The Villian in Black review in Rap Pages April 1996
lol...... ::)
sometimes i wonder if they've actually heard the same album as we did.


Yeah,
my objective overall rating would be 4/5
my subjective personal rating would be 4.5/5
Thereīs a couple of tracks that got to go,but damn that album is tight.



i see what the writer is saying, but i disagree.
while (some) of the beats are slower than the examples he used in his article, i think it would go too far to state that slower beats for the villain in black are a major flaw; it's not really an issue for me, since i think Ren's delivery is still strong. just listen to the great elephant, mad scientist, i don't give a damn, still the same nigga, , keep it real, bitch made nigga killa, bring it on, live from compton saturday night ( almost the entire album, 8 out 10 tracks---> not counting muhammed speaks; to call this a major flaw is clearly an exaggeration).
on niggaz4life Ren was also rapping on some "slower" beats, and his flow was still good.

if the source is already making a big deal out of this, i wonder what they have to say about the D.O.C.'s voice in their review of helter skelter  :-X


Hereīs Rap Pages review of The Villian in Black,they gave it 5 out of 10  :P >:(
How is that possible? ....sure we all miss Renīs "old" flow,but that doesnīt mean that his new flow is wak.
263 MC Ren; The Villian in Black review in Rap Pages April 1996
lol...... ::)
sometimes i wonder if they've actually heard the same album as we did.


Yeah,
my objective overall rating would be 4/5
my subjective personal rating would be 4.5/5
Thereīs a couple of tracks that got to go,but damn that album is tight.

not sure how high i would rate the album, but it wouldn't be much different from yours.
it's like that and mind blowin' aren't really typical Ren tracks though, if you know what i mean  :laugh:


Quote
not sure how high i would rate the album, but it wouldn't be much different from yours.
it's like that and mind blowin' aren't really typical Ren tracks though, if you know what i mean

^^^^^
Exactly,those two should go.
Theyīre not wak,but they donīt really fit Renīs style and drags down the "flow" of the album.


props on this chad

wescoast history right here

thats fucked up how cube dogged yella on the one moe nigga to go album
that shit was not about record sales or nothin, just a tribute. it still came out tight. dirty reds westside story and aint no love, bg knoccouts song, it was a dope album, a lil short thou.

imagine if cube was spittin on str8 off tha streetz of compton. its fucked up how everyone turned on the lil big man after he passed. but shit always comes back again.

after readin yellas comments on cube, he has said before that he has in his possesion one eazy e song that is just str8 up diss records towards cube, but he will never release it. i hope one day one of em porn bitches just leak that shit, its been far too damn long.


thats fucked up how cube dogged yella on the one moe nigga to go album
that shit was not about record sales or nothin, just a tribute.
it still came out tight. dirty reds westside story and aint no love, bg knoccouts song, it was a dope album, a lil short thou.

I also love Yellaīs album,I miss all off Eazyīs friends on Yellaīs album.
Only the "underdogs" showed love  >:(....
Whereīs ATL and Ren?  >:(
Itīs not like Yellaīs a bad producer by himself,the Yomo and Maulkie album proved that.


Foe tha love of money, classic westcoast beat. yella is mad under rated

i have always wondered that myself, where was ATL and Ren. they were all down at that time.


Foe tha love of money, classic westcoast beat. yella is mad under rated

Sure,so classic that he/ruthless used for both Yomo & Maulkie and Bone.  ;) :laugh:

Yomo & Maulkie ''Mockingbird''*Director Marty Thomas produced by DJ Yella
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/jl9O8-6vrzE&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/jl9O8-6vrzE&amp;rel</a>

from the Yella produced album;
Yomo & Maulkie; Are U Xperienced?

16 used & new available from $5.33
http://www.amazon.com/Are-U-Xperienced-Yomo-Maulkie/dp/B000008MJO/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1202992018&sr=8-1


^^^^dope album^^^^^


I was thinking, why didn't ruthless push Fuck tha police as a single?
I know that there are some similarities with straight outta compton,
but the company could have pushed it as a 4th single and shoot a video for it?
financially it wouldn't be a problem,because the total costs for the album were very low anyway.

What I observed is that singles is released if they think it can push more units of the album. (Ruthless and DR)
The album buzz is normally over after the 2nd single,the 3rd is somehow released to see if they can squezze some more out of it.
Ruthless and Death Row seemed to go by the same formula.
Check it;
Straight Outta Compton;
-Straight Outta Compton
-Gangster Gangster
-Express Yourself..... then they follow up with a new release; 100 Miles and runninī

The Chronic;
-G Thang
-Dre-Day
-Let Me Ride then they followed up with Doggystyle

It seems like they liked to keep the hype up for their next release and let the third single kinda sleep itīs way onto the next release.
They also followed the same formula with Doggystyle to DoggFood.

I'm sure Jerry Heller thought about it. I wonder what made him decide not to push it as a single.
I mean there was so much buzz around that song;
Chad i'm sure you've read the stories about the issues that popped up during the NWA tours  ;)

Maybe they figured they didnīt need to put out as a single and that "Fuck The Police"
might be one reason so many people bought the ALBUM,you know.




I mean,Straight outta compton and Fuck tha police are the main songs of the straight outta compton album,
so i agree with Ren;[/color]
Quote
ThaFormula.com - Did you guys know what your were about to do as far as the concepts for the album?
MC Ren - Yeah, if you listen to "Straight Out of Compton," and "Fuck tha Police,"
them probably the only two on there that's talkin' like serious shit,

^^^^
But remember there was 5 cats in NWA;
Cube,Ren and Eazy was probably behind the "gangster concepts"
while Dre,Yella (and The D.O.C) was more into the "Hip Hop" joints you know,thatīs at least how I assume it was.



I was thinking, why didn't ruthless push Fuck tha police as a single?
I know that there are some similarities with straight outta compton,
but the company could have pushed it as a 4th single and shoot a video for it?
financially it wouldn't be a problem,because the total costs for the album were very low anyway.

What I observed is that singles is released if they think it can push more units of the album. (Ruthless and DR)
The album buzz is normally over after the 2nd single,the 3rd is somehow released to see if they can squezze some more out of it.
Ruthless and Death Row seemed to go by the same formula.
Check it;
Straight Outta Compton;
-Straight Outta Compton
-Gangster Gangster
-Express Yourself..... then they follow up with a new release; 100 Miles and runninī

The Chronic;
-G Thang
-Dre-Day
-Let Me Ride then they followed up with Doggystyle

It seems like they liked to keep the hype up for their next release and let the third single kinda sleep itīs way onto the next release.
They also followed the same formula with Doggystyle to DoggFood.

I'm sure Jerry Heller thought about it. I wonder what made him decide not to push it as a single.
I mean there was so much buzz around that song;
Chad i'm sure you've read the stories about the issues that popped up during the NWA tours  ;)

Maybe they figured they didnīt need to put out as a single and that "Fuck The Police"
might be one reason so many people bought the ALBUM,you know.

ronin ro talks about the NWA tour incident ( the NWA members screamed fuck the police during the concert, and soon got arrested).
after reading that + reading your post it made me rethink; NWA already got a lot of media attention because of that incident, and the FBI letter so i guess releasing fuck the police wasn't necessary anymore.
as you pointed out, after the 3rd single, the 100 miles and runnin' ep was being released.


I mean,Straight outta compton and Fuck tha police are the main songs of the straight outta compton album,
so i agree with Ren;[/color]
Quote
ThaFormula.com - Did you guys know what your were about to do as far as the concepts for the album?
MC Ren - Yeah, if you listen to "Straight Out of Compton," and "Fuck tha Police,"
them probably the only two on there that's talkin' like serious shit,

^^^^
But remember there was 5 cats in NWA;
Cube,Ren and Eazy was probably behind the "gangster concepts"
while Dre,Yella (and The D.O.C) was more into the "Hip Hop" joints you know,thatīs at least how I assume it was.
yeah i know, i do disagree with ren that the rest are fillers.
although something 2 dance 2 does not belong on an NWA album imo.
according to ronin ro's book, Dre, Ren, Cube, and Yella didn't want the track on the album but Eazy felt sorry for Arabian Prince, so that's why he did put the track on straight outta compton.






yeah i know, i do disagree with Ren that the rest are fillers.
although something 2 dance 2 does not belong on an NWA album imo.
according to ronin ro's book, Dre, Ren, Cube, and Yella didn't want the track on the album but Eazy felt sorry for Arabian Prince,
so that's why he did put the track on straight outta compton.

hmmm,Straight Outta Compton ainīt perfect.
This is one album that could have problems getting the classic status if we where only speaking musically you know.
It got the classic status because it broke new ground and set new standards,but as a musical masterpiece no. (my opinion  ;))
Personally I like Eazy Duz It more as an overall record,sure Straight Outta Compton has the strongest tracks,
but overall Eazy Duz It sounds better in my ears.
But remember Renīs frame of mind had changed since he did that record.
I donīt think he would do those "Run DMC" type of records anymore,sure Run DMC is still one of his idols he modeled his style after.
But as time went by the records had more influence from PE and BDP than Run DMCīs "rock the party" joints.
So that might be the reason he said the rest was fillers I guess  ;)





yeah i know, i do disagree with Ren that the rest are fillers.
although something 2 dance 2 does not belong on an NWA album imo.
according to ronin ro's book, Dre, Ren, Cube, and Yella didn't want the track on the album but Eazy felt sorry for Arabian Prince,
so that's why he did put the track on straight outta compton.

hmmm,Straight Outta Compton ainīt perfect.
This is one album that could have problems getting the classic status if we where only speaking musically you know.
It got the classic status because it broke new ground and set new standards,but as a musical masterpiece no. (my opinion  ;))
Personally I like Eazy Duz It more as an overall record,sure Straight Outta Compton has the strongest tracks,
but overall Eazy Duz It sounds better in my ears.
But remember Renīs frame of mind had changed since he did that record.
I donīt think he would do those "Run DMC" type of records anymore,sure Run DMC is still one of his idols he modeled his style after.
But as time went by the records had more influence from PE and BDP than Run DMCīs "rock the party" joints.
So that might be the reason he said teh rest was fillers (I assume)  ;)


personally i actually like the production of straight outta compton more than those of eazy duz it, but i see your point about the production; on straight outta compton dre was sort of emulating the sound of public enemy's 2nd album, while on niggaz4life he was more developing a different sound.

come to think of it, i might put niggaz4life to the test for the source reviews topic again


yeah i know, i do disagree with Ren that the rest are fillers.
although something 2 dance 2 does not belong on an NWA album imo.
according to ronin ro's book, Dre, Ren, Cube, and Yella didn't want the track on the album
but Eazy felt sorry for Arabian Prince,so that's why he did put the track on straight outta compton.

hmmm,Straight Outta Compton ainīt perfect.
This is one album that could have problems getting the classic status if we where only speaking musically you know.
It got the classic status because it broke new ground and set new standards,but as a musical masterpiece no. (my opinion  ;))
Personally I like Eazy Duz It more as an overall record,sure Straight Outta Compton has the strongest tracks,
but overall Eazy Duz It sounds better in my ears.
But remember Renīs frame of mind had changed since he did that record.
I donīt think he would do those "Run DMC" type of records anymore,sure Run DMC is still one of his idols he modeled his style after.
But as time went by the records had more influence from PE and BDP than Run DMCīs "rock the party" joints.
So that might be the reason he said the rest was fillers I guess  ;)

personally i actually like the production of straight outta compton more than those of eazy duz it,
but i see your point about the production;
on straight outta compton dre was sort of emulating the sound of public enemy's 2nd album,
while on niggaz4life he was more developing a different sound.
Come to think of it,I might put niggaz4life to the test for the source reviews topic again

I was thinking about Ren lyrically  ;),he was going from Run DMC "rock the party" Hip Hop rhymes to a more militant style.
Sure he has always been hardcore but you know shit changed,,,,,  ;)
As for production I would say that Eazy Duz It had many G-Funk elements in it,funk samples and what not.
But somehow that album get overlooked when cats review Dreīs production work.  :-\
I think Dre devolved the "100 Miles/Jimmy Z/Niggaz4Life" while vibeing with Colin Wolfe and Mike Sims.


Come to think of it,I might put niggaz4life to the test for the source reviews topic again

^^^^^^
Do that,should be interesting.
I also got to reply to HighEyeCueīs Kurupt review  ;).




Thats the best NWA Post break up interview and my favourite Eazy interview
He gives up the real,no bullshit like he said, greed,big heads and egos tore that house down,and people puttin bullshit in niggas ears
Dre never gave a response like this, he just brought up the "shady dealings"
but everyone knows now, that dre was living good, bumped in the bitch in red named suge,
got fucked outta deathrow and the rest is history.
Dre left a good situation for somethin that looked good in his eyes, almost everyone elses has well, but was too fucked up to be true.

I think Dre regret this,Iīve been talking with Dre-Day about this a lot trough PM.
D.O.C all strung out on the white girl while hanging with Suge.
...and as you said puttin bullshit in their ears. (according to Jerry Hellerīs book,and I actually believe Jerry).


Yeah, like ive heard old friends of Eazy talk about that situation, alot of people will not forgive Dre for that.
Dre and Eazy back in the day was tight like brothers, enter Suge, the rest is history

DOC was preety messed up, eric and jerry tried to help him get his vioce back, but he could not get off the bottle and that other thang. E tried to help him alot, and he just went AWOL. imagine if he had his voice back and could drop records with a decent voice. shit be bananas.


Yeah, like ive heard old friends of Eazy talk about that situation,alot of people will not forgive Dre for that.
Dre and Eazy back in the day was tight like brothers, enter Suge, the rest is history

Dre-Day brought up the other day that the loss of Dreīs brother might have something to do with it.
I mean D.O.C all strung out on the white girl after the accident and Dre a little fucked after the loss of his brother.
Shit like that might affect you to re-think your life and do some stupid decisions like going with Suge.  ;)

DOC was preety messed up, eric and jerry tried to help him get his vioce back,
but he could not get off the bottle and that other thang. E tried to help him alot, and he just went AWOL.

When I read how that shit went down I got really dissapointed,D.O.C can only blame himself if this is true.  :-\ :P

imagine if he had his voice back and could drop records with a decent voice.
shit be bananas.


 :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock:




The DOC had one of the greatest VOICES in hip hop history, its a damn shame what happened and now that I'm listening to "Helter Skelter" if only he had his old voice to go with those beats on that album because Erotic D did some good production


When I read how that shit went down I got really dissapointed,D.O.C can only blame himself if this is true.  :-\ :P

imagine if he had his voice back and could drop records with a decent voice.
shit be bananas.
:banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock: :banana: :banana_rock:

:laugh:

Dre-Day brought up the other day that the loss of Dreīs brother might have something to do with it.
I mean D.O.C all strung out on the white girl after the accident and Dre a little fucked after the loss of his brother.
Shit like that might affect you to re-think your life and do some stupid decisions like going with Suge.  ;)
yeah suge couldn't have had a better timing  >:(



The DOC had one of the greatest VOICES in hip hop history, its a damn shame what happened and now that I'm listening to
"Helter Skelter" if only he had his old voice to go with those beats on that album because Erotic D did some good production

Chadīs PERSONAL breakdown of The D.O.C Helter Skelter album;
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=144128.msg1738137#msg1738137

nice review Chad, I'm also gonna do one, hopefully it will be up by the end of the week and I'll post it in that thread



dope
has much has i love reading, some of em, like this last Dj Yella one got me preety depressed. its sad hearing about e's last days and all the shady behind the scenes shit that was going on for all his loot. i always think he just gave up, he did not want to live in this world and be associated with aids. his last wish was to drop the top and cruise one last time.

Imagine if NWA went on tour right after Niggaz4life. It would have been a monster tour, bigger then any i can even remember. After selling a million in the first week no radio play, damn they really knew how to make that shit look Eazy.


i always think he just gave up, he did not want to live in this world and be associated with aids. his last wish was to drop the top and cruise one last time.

what makes you think that?

based on what the the people close to Eazy say, i don't get that impression at all about Eazy  :-\


think about it from a human aspect, fuck the rapper/fan shit
its some real fucked up shit to deal with, your on top of the world, young, rich, living the good life, good business, and then bam you get aids. your never looked at the same again. (especially if your in hip hop, can you imagine someone put out a diss record, soulja boy would ether a dude with hiv if shit was like that) realistically it killed him but shit even if he could live, do you think he would.

about takin a cruise with the top down,

Charms Henry, Eazy's former personal assistant and longtime friend:

Eazy was diagnosed with AIDS March 1. "He told me it wasn't fair, " says Henry, her voice tense with emotion. "That he didn't want to die. He said he wouldn't care if he didn't have a dime; he said he wouldn't care what anybody said, if he could just drop the top on his car and ride up the coast one more time."

"She told you, right?" is how Eazy-E told Big Man and Jacob T. that he was dying of AIDS. The "she" was his soon-to-be wife, Tomica, who had been keeping a bedside vigil since Eazy was hospitalized. Eazy was scheduled for surgery the next day, March 15, so that excess fluid could be drained from his lungs. Amid concern that he might not survive the surgery, he married Tomica Woods. Woods and her daughter subsequently tested negative for HIV, though they may not be out of danger, as the virus sometimes takes months to show up in tests.











 

The Predator

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Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #161 on: April 16, 2008, 07:37:13 PM »
^RBX interview :

Whoever the janitor or prankster was that locked the stairwell case and elevator in the studio is responsible for RBX's most memorable line 'I drop bombs like Hiroshima'.
Trust RBX to take a nap (he got that sleeping disorder) while Dre went back to his studio toys and crafted 'High Powered'.


Also RBX's pops is Bootsy Collins, ha!
« Last Edit: April 16, 2008, 07:44:11 PM by The Predator »
 

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RocknRoll comics presents NWA




























 

Dre-Day

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haha, funny and true  8) i love the irony and sarcasm  :laugh: especially about Cube  ;D

not to mention the picture that included the text, Prof. Ice Cube  ;)

and the picture that included the comment about one less bitch is very funny too :D

Chad Vader

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Someone bumped a old thread where tnp had typed out The Source magazine reviews of;
Ice Cube - Death Certificate and AMW
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=34074.msg385454#msg385454

Might as well jack it and post it here;  ;)
Quote
Ice Cube - Death Certificate and AMW Source reviews  Ŧ on: May 18, 2003, 08:24:01 PM ŧ
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=34074.msg385454#msg385454

Death Certificate

4 1/2 mics

Ice Cube has unleashed his second solo album and it ain't no gangsta's fairytale.
Death Certificate begins with "The Death Side a mirrored image of where we are today"
and continues with "The Life Side, a vision of where we need to go."
The catalyst in this version is the Nation of Islam (Cube is now a member).
Cube's lyrics draw on the Nation's messages of knowledge of self, economic self sufficiency,
and self-determination.
The "Death Side" begins with "The Wrong Nigga to Fuck With," an all out attack similar to
"The Nigga You Love to Hate." "My Summer Vacation" tells the tale of gang-banging
LA drug dealers who start scramblin' in East St. Louis over a funky "Atomic Dog" loop.
"Givin Up the Nappy Dug Out" exposes a father's supposedly immaculate
Catholic school daughter as the tramp of the neighborhood over a fat "Hip Hugger" loop.
"A Bird in the Hand" is the story of a young Black male who must sell drugs to support his family.
The track uses the slamming loop from the recent Cube/EPMD St. Ide's commercial.
"Alive on Arrival" is an incredible account of being shot and going to
"the county hospital jack/where niggas die over a little scratch."
On the "Life Side" Cube assaults white supremacy on "I Wanna Kill Sam" and "Horny Lil Devil",
 while "Black Korea" takes aim at Korean merchants with businesses in Black communities
who Cube sees as being insensitive to Black people. "Be True to the Game" loops
the Gap Band's "Outstanding" while Cube blasts the "sellouts",
for forgetting their roots after making some money. "Us,"
is Cube's call for the Black community to stop destroying itself and unite in order to become self-sufficient.
Using the old "Dazz" sample, Cube saves the final deathblow for a blistering rebuttal to
NWA entitled "No Vaseline." After Boyz N The Hood,
people may have been expecting to hear a "politically correct" Ice Cube record.
The sometimes harsh rhetoric is part of his mission help the
Black community and that may be hard for some to swallow.
Death Certificate's production is good and will keep your ear,
but it doesn't really break any new ground like Amerikkka's Most Wanted.
Many of the samples are recognizable and the overall sound has a funk vibe.
Sir Jinx's tracks are denser and busier while the Boogie Men keep things sparser and more beat oriented,
but the record is overall Cube. Ice Cube's lyrical styles and concepts
carry the album and make it something hip hop fans must have.

review by Reef

Amerikkka's Most Wanted

5 mics

It's Amerikkka's favorite "Gangsta Gangsta" shootin' straight from the lip.
 So all sellouts, black radio, police, rednecks, suckers and record stores better beware of the Lench Mob.
 This record is summed up best by Cube himself when he says
"I'm solo, you ask how I'm livin/still drop more shit than a pigeon."
Each song interlocks with the next puzzle, while each piece keeps its distinctive shape.
So much of this album is excellent; the Bomb Squad has really outdone itself on this effort,
blending their metallic bum-rush style of beats with funky pimp type grooves to create noise with a serious gangsta limp.
(Makes you wonder what they were - or weren't - doing on P.E.'s album).
It's the perfect backdrop for Ice Cube to get everything off his chest--and then some.
Ice Cube says "Fuck Top 40" but this album may well end up on it.


another jacked post from tnp, ;)
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=34071.msg385407#msg385407
Lethal Injection
3 1/2 mics

Before Dre and Snoop became household names on both coasts, Ice Cube had already started tearing down the wall seperating the East and West Coasts of the hip-hop nation. As a boundary-less lyrical master with movie joints to boot, Cube was quite the man. Now with his fourth solo effort in less than four years, Ice Cube is still big-time but this shot in the arm is considerably less potent than his original nigga-you-loved-to-hate material.
My first impression of the album was one of unimpressed ambivalence. After the so-so Predator album, I was open for a big comeback. I wanted more of the ill gangster-isms of "Once Upon a Time in the Projects" or "Steady Mobbin'," and les sof "Wicked"'s trendy mark-isms. This album is somewhere in between the two and it grows on you.
Production-wise, the album displays both the G-Funk trend and the Oakland sound. The results of QDIII, Jinx, Laylaw and lesser knowns Brian G, Madness 4 Real and 88X Unit are bumpin' but Cube seems to be searching for that tight fit he used to have. A perfect example of that paradox is "Down 4 Whatever," produced by Madness 4 Real. This is creepin' music straight up and down. You got the evil synth whine up top with sonic bass tremors down low, plus ultra-slow, molasses-flow lyrics like "Here comes the big headed nigga that's dippin'/Sippin on Courvosier/God-damn, I must have the floss today/Now pimpin ain't easy but it's necessary/So I'm chasin' bitches like Tom chases Jerry." Dope as hell except for the fact that it sounds nothing like Cube. More like Too Short, with a li'l pinch of Snoop. Change and development is Kool and the Gang but you miss Cube's ill humor, manipulating verbals into narratives. His flow is more disjointed now, forming clever phrases rather than paragraphs.
Aside from the criticisms, Cube scores on tracks like "Really Doe," "You Know How We Do It" and "Lil Ass Gee." The bass-heavy beats are on point as Cube expounds on the hoo-bang lifestyle. And there's some anti-white, anti-Christian preaching as well. A message to white women, "Cave Bitch" is as musically dope but also as lyrically vicious as Death Certificate's "Horny Lil Devil," with disconcerting rhymes like, "I'm true to the game/Y'all all look the same/Standin by my backstage door, hopin I will switch/Spread out ya little cave bitch!" For the most part though, the other cuts sound regular; nothing pure bunk, but no classic material either. If you're a true Ice Cube fan and you have all of his previous work, by all means get Lethal Injection for the good shit. But for all y'all others, if you don't already own Amerikkka's Most Wanted and/or Death Certificate, take care of your business. Don't buy the rims 'til you've got the '64.

review by Shortie.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2008, 07:42:14 PM by Chad Vader Supporter of the Kill Jimmy Iovine Movement »
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
RBX interviews;


RBX interview in The Source October 1995 NO.73



RBX interview in Hip Hop Connection March 2008





Dr.Dre's version why RBX left Death Row;
Quote
The Source September 93 #48
The Source:


But RBX,who sets shit off on "High Powered" jumped ship just as Death Row began to move into their new offices. When The Source Matty C received a fax from Disney's Hollywood Basic announcing they'd signed RBX,he called Suge. According to Suge,he'd heard of no such thing.
I ask Dre about RBX..."Ehh...that's my boy,me and him are cool...I don't know." he pauses briefly. "He been having those mothafuckas running up in his ear. See it's like this,when RBX came down,that's Snoop's cousin you know..." He decides to end it there,remembering what words can do when exchanged in public. I ask if RBX's deal with Hollywood Basic is official. "Naw,legally he still with me. I'm just gonna wait to see what happens." He decides to continue.
     "Soon as he blew up,soon as my record came out,you got a gang of mothafuckas talkin' about what they should be doing,where they should be,what they should have. Mothafuckas that didn't give a fuck about 'im before the record came out."
But isn't that what N.W.A went trough? "Naw,my shit was real. My business was fucked up. I'm not fucking over my people. Cuz I been on that side so I know what they expect and what they want. You keep the artist happy and there won't be no problems. Snoop is like my little brother yaknowwhatimsayin'? I'm just watching everybody's back. Everybody knows I've been in the industry a long time they know I know what I'm talkin about. So they listen to me. And I love them for that,because they trust my judgement."





RBX: Still Droppin’ Bombs ...allhiphop interview
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=160333.0
In 1992, Dr. Dre’s The Chronic blazed in a new era of Hip-Hop. More than being the catalyst for the G-Funk era, it was the foundation upon which Death Row Records was built. It possessed an intensity, boldness and swagger that seemed to be in direct defiance of the Native Tongue movement taking place out in the East. The spokespeople for this new sound were a stable of hungry artists wanting to claim the spotlight left vacant by N.W.A. A smooth rhyming Calvin Broadus Jr. (Snoop Doggy Dogg at that time) and the booming, unorthodox style of Eric Collins (RBX) were the most talked about of these new artists.

Through the rise and eventual fall of Death Row, Snoop and RBX were selected as “Most likely to blow up” by industry insiders. 15 years after their introduction, RBX and Snoop have had careers that have gone in very different directions. Despite both winning awards and being a part of platinum selling projects, RBX has remained underground while Snoop basks in the limelight. With the release of his latest project, Broken Silence, RBX looks to silence critics by demonstrating that he can still drop bombs like Hiroshima.


AllHipHop.com: The intro to Broken Silence features a reporter asking you about where you have been since ’94. Do you think that the common perception is that this is your first album since The Chronic?

RBX: Well actually he was being sarcastic. I don’t know if it came across like that, but some people may not know me. For those that don’t, they may think that this is my first album, but if they dig into the crates, so to speak, they will find out that it is not.

AllHipHop.com: You were introduced to the world via The Chronic, has there been any talk about you appearing on Detox?

RBX: Yes there has. I am in the dark about the record just like everyone else. I had a conversation with one of my folks and they said that Dre is not complete on who he is going to have on it; he is still digging through some of the songs he has, but maybe I will make it. I don’t know yet. We are going to have to wait and see. Dre is so picky that one week you might be on there and the next week you are not, so you just have to wait till it comes out to see.

AllHipHop.com: You have experienced everything there is to experience in this industry, but what would you say is the most frustrating aspect of being involved in Hip-Hop right now?

RBX: A lot of these industry cats don’t know the history of Hip-Hop. No one looks out for the next man.

AllHipHop.com: You appear on various projects by the Visionaries and Ld and Ariano’s A Thin line, but how did you guys first connect?

RBX: Ariano has a kid by one of my brother’s cousins. Ariano tried to get at my homie Quaz who was working at this studio. We met and ended up always working around each other. Since he was working with the Visionaries, one day I hollered at Key Kool and 2mex and the whole crew, and now it’s all family. Working on this project with the Visionaries was strictly Hip-Hop. Everyone would come in like it was the Terrordome. All the MCs stepped their game up.

AllHipHop.com: A year ago at the Visionaries album release party, you came out and kicked a freestyle. What was that like to perform in front of your home crowd surrounded by your family?

RBX: Aww man you remember that. That show was crazy. It was really good. I work really hard to get the audience tuned in. To see loved ones from Long Beach show appreciation is a good feeling. It gives me my mojo back and reminds me I have some time left and some things to do.

AllHipHop.com: You state on “Echoes of My Mind” that you were disenchanted after the Death Row situation and the passing of Biggie and Pac, but then you were back on. What was it that got you back on to Hip-Hop?

RBX: I still had a love for it. I would hear beats, and my mind would start wandering. I would write hooks, so I knew I still had the itch. I was just depressed and frustrated because things didn’t turn out exactly like I thought they would, but I had to just grow up and stop being a big baby, get my mojo back, and start to doing what I am supposed to be doing.

AllHipHop.com: Do you think those experiences have made you a stronger artist?

RBX: Oh my God, yes! At the time I was going through them, no I did not think that. I thought it’s a rap, I am through with this bullshit. As they say, “what doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger.” I now actually see what I was doing wrong back then, and I have corrected my errors. I act the way I do now because of the things I have gone through. I no longer drink or party. I ain’t got time for that bullsh*t. This is what I have come to.

AllHipHop.com: Snoop produces “Overdue”. What is your impression of Snoop as a producer?

RBX: He is my cousin and is serious about everything he does. At first I didn’t know he was serious about production, but he sent me this track, and it was all good.

AllHipHop.com: How did it come about that he would produce a track for this album but not rhyme on it?

RBX: He could have rhymed on it but at the pace we were working at, he wasn’t free at the time because Snoop’s plate is full as hell. I didn’t consider it because I know his schedule, but it’s not a big deal.

AllHipHop.com: What is your opinion of the state of West Coast Hip-Hop?

RBX: 9-1-1.

AllHipHop.com: Why do you say that?

RBX: You have all of the hoods in Long Beach and you have all of the hoods in Compton, Inglewood, Watts, all of those cities, and everybody is hating on everybody. There is so much hatred that nobody can grow. If we don’t have the West accepting the West, how do we expect others to accept that the West is hard when we are disrespecting our own people? We close the door on local cats, but if someone comes from Atlanta then the door is wide open, and we can’t understand that. The difference between cats in Oakland and out here is out there they are all together. Out there they may not like each other, but they are professional and will work together to get money and after they are done in the studio they can tell each other to get the f*ck on. Out here, they just want to cut and shoot and act like they are super-duper hard. No one is trying to be professional; everyone is trying to be a thug and a gangster. The industry mutherf*ckers get mad because they are intimidated because they didn’t grow up in that sh*t. I am talking about these rich kids whose fathers own billion dollar companies. They ain’t trying to get no AK shot through their Maybach These labels water down their material by going out to the Midwest to get all their artists rather than working with artists from the West Coast.

AllHipHop.com: What can we expect from the upcoming Concrete Criminals project with Ren and will producer LD be involved in the production?

RBX: In a week or two that sh*t is going to be done. I am about to make fireworks pop. I am going to slow my pace because the response I am getting from Broken Silence is overwhelming. I don’t think LD will be involved. Anything that I control, LD will be a part of, but when I am not in control, I don’t want to squeeze him into a situation that he wouldn’t be comfortable with. This is going to be a bang-out, bang bang album. This album will show that I have every piece of skill that I ever had. I am still rough and grimy. We are going to say some old N.W.A type sh*t on this album that will make people go, “What the F*ck?!” Stay Tuned.


Prop Inmate in the thread I jacked the interview from^^^^^^^






Another recent RBX related thread;
Quote
MC Ren Returns With RBX As Concrete Criminals
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=158889.0




RBX Interview www.rapreviews.com/
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=161094.0
Known most for his gravelly voiced appearances on classics such as The Chronic and The Mashall Mathers LP, RBX has been moving, and in some cases frightening, crowds for over fifteen years. A Grammy award winning artist, RBX recently released a full length album titled Broken Silence and plans on following it up in 2008 with Unanimous. Even with all that solo work listeners can still expect to hear him continuing to guest on other people's work, as well. He notes "I need to holler at Em. You need to shoot that shout out. That's my dog." This week the man who describes himself as "a dormant volcano" sat down with RapReviews to discuss his storied career, how his work now differs from his work in the past, and why he's happy rappers have taken a step back from the idea of "keeping it real."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adam Bernard: Before we even get started with the real questions I heard you just had some work done to your car.
RBX: Actually I got a new radiator put in because I saw coolant leaking and I don't like coolant leaking out the car, that's not a good thing, so I have them doing some work on it. It's a big ass BMW and it can't leak. If it starts leaking that means it's gonna lead to a bigger leak and I might be out somewhere one day and that shit bust on me. It's pretty much a maintenance issue.

AB: So this isn't a Pimp My Ride situation.
RBX: Aw naw, it's a nice BM but no it's not getting flashed out, it's pretty much a maintenance thing and that's it. You pull up, you're leaking coolant, that's not cool. Girls lookin at you like damn, his car's leaking fluids and shit. Yeah, that's not a good look. If you can rectify it you might wanna just go ahead and get that cleaned

AB: Yeah, I don't think the ladies are going to wait around after the show while you get your car fixed.
RBX: You dig! That's exactly what I'm saying. "Hold on baby, let me see if I can get a jump start."

AB: Moving to the subject of your music. Broken Silence is the new album. Tell me a little bit about what silence you're breaking.
RBX: The silence of me not really actually having a record that I control and that I was the driving force behind without censorship from major labels or VPs who don't want you doing this, don't want you doing that, can't say this, can't say that. This is me saying what the fuck I want to say.

AB: What's the average person going to learn about you from this album that they don't know already?
RBX: That I'm nice. Everybody thinks I'm just a voice. (growls) But he ain't rapping, he ain't got nothing to say. That's kind of how I was in some situations when I was with some of my other cats. (growls) and then I'm gone. Motherfuckers be like "what was that?" You didn't get to really hear me rhyme, you'd just get to hear me do a little somethin something. They basically heard the voice, but now they're hearing me rap.

AB: Are you saying that your being viewed as "just a voice" was almost justified back in the day?
RBX: Yeah, cuz back in the day everybody had their part to play. Dre with the beat, Snoop was the young MC who got all the girls, Daz with the bang bang, Warren G had his role; Dre knew what the fuck he was doing, he incorporated all of this and I was the monster. RAWR! I was that. Listen to The Chronic and you'll see what I'm talking about.

AB: How did the folks you had worked with in the past react to this really lyrical side of who you are?
RBX: You know what, honestly, I have not heard one bad thing. I figured there were going to be some haters and some naysayers, but not one. My niggas was like, "we ain't surprised. We know you. We were just waiting for you to shit." I'm thinking I'm gonna get some "YEA RBX," but I've been getting "you did what we thought you was going to do." I don't get no pat on the back or nuttin. I kind of wanted to hear "you have room for improvement," but nah, "that's hot," that's all I get.

AB: Taking that situation you went through, should we be looking at some of the younger MCs of today and thinking more of what they might be ten years down the line, in effect saying let's give them a few years?
RBX: It's not a lesson. I ain't no rap guru godfather. If they're really into it there is an automatic progression that takes place. A lot of MCs out there can do their thing but there's not one that can knock me out the box. Right now there are some MCs out there that are hot, they're nice, but they can get knocked out. I'm one of those you can't knock out. As soon as I hear what it is I'ma fire a missile back. I can't be beat and I'm confident with that.

AB: You've worked with a lot of legendary artists. With Broken Silence you have your own voice. What makes you better now than you were back in your Chronic days?
RBX: I didn't know nothing then. Now I can see things a little better and clearer. Clarity is the key. Sometimes you try to help folks and I don't know what's wrong with society today, but if I had gone about all this Hollywood and gotten all the known bigwigs to do the record the first thing cats would have been saying is "oh he don't come down and work with the underground cats." When I go try to work with the underground cats the first thing they try to do is take me out to box like on some battle shit. I'm thinking in my head "what an idiot. I'm down here trying to help you, we've put this together and that's just an attempt to divide right there." There are big conflicts that I have but I get past them because I'm from the street and nobody can say nothing because I rap good and I'll smash they ass. So basically me going down into the pits was just a way to rejuvenate my whole thing and keep everything sharp and precise

AB: Over the past fifteen years what have been some of your favorite memories from all your performances and studio sessions?
RBX: There was one time, I think it was Rock the Bells, I was just going on stage to watch KRS-One get down. I was NOT in performance mode, I was NOT supposed to get down, I was just up there to support my brother and somehow... Kris didn't even know I was out there, he was just doing his thing, but he did a move where he spun around and saw me. He said "what!?! Is this RBX on the stage!?!" And it was a wrap. I think there was Nas, Talib Kweli, Freestyle Fellowship and we just shit! We just shit on 16,000 motherfuckers and Kris was like "Fuck that! Turn the music off! A capella!" I jumped up on a speaker and just shit. I remember that, that was fun. I just really love what I do.

AB: What do you feel has been your greatest accomplishment?
RBX: Aw man, just being alive. You don't even realize that is a job. Everything, all that extra shit, it's nothing. Houses and all that shit come and go and people stressing and worrying themselves behind some material ass shit when they can just live, that's enough. Everything else can come and go, don't trip. Everyone wants the finer things but if you had a nice ass house and a BMW and all that shit but you didn't have no oxygen...

AB: Good point. Finally, what do you like about what's going on in Hip-Hop today?
RBX: You know what, actually, I like the fact that niggas is getting back to headbanging. It was never meant to be a physical altercation, or go get your gun and kill a nigga. You can talk about it, but c'mon now, when all that bullshit is blurted out, "we gonna keep it super real," that's when they start killing. On "Fly MC" Special Ed was talking about he was flying on his jet and kicked the bitch through the cargo hatch. Everybody knows he wasn't in a jet kicking the Queen of France through a fucking hatch, but they didn't send nobody out to fuck with Special Ed about that. It was hot, but then you couldn't do shit like that, people were like that shit ain't real and everybody's talking really really real like I'm going to come to your studio with my AK and kill you. No! Slow down, buddy. That's kind of where the problem came in. Right now rap is realizing I'ma get at you, but I ain't really trying to come and kill you and your family, homey, I'ma try and bust your head open with these verbs and that's what it was meant to be. At the end of the day I'll see you, we can smoke a blunt and have a burger together, dawg, but when I'm doing my thing in the studio I'm a monster and I'ma try to slice your whole jugular out, but it's words. There's a difference between some rap shit and some not rap shit.

AB: I've noticed quite a few rappers who never had rap sheet, or who only had small ones, have been getting into a lot of trouble for starting to believe their own rhymes.
RBX: Idiots. And that's what happens. I ain't gotta prove shit. Matter of fact I'm trying to live some shit down. I'm soft skinned. I ain't trying to act hard. Everybody else trying to act hard, in all honesty it's on some reverse osmosis and that's what you gotta remember. Cats that be acting like they all hard be the softest motherfuckers in the whole building. It was always the case in the streets that the cats who don't say one motherfuckin word be the most vicious motherfucker in the whole spot. All that rah rah, that's all for hype and record sales. That's bullshit

http://www.rapreviews.com/



Prop KURUPTION-81 for the interview.... ;)



RBX interview @ HHDX
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=160917.0
Quote
http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/features/id.953

RBX will be remembered for his lyrics alongside his manhood in Hip Hop history. A cousin of Snoop Dogg, X was the first - and one of the only artists to ever leave Death Row Records. He did so after working on The Chronic and Doggystyle and found underground success on several independent labels with pet releases before returning beside Dr. Dre at Aftermath Records in the late '90s.

Though he's always been underground and always taken lengthy hiatuses, few expected RBX to reappear working alongside DJ Rhettmatic and LMNO as well as other veteran artists of the nouveau Los Angeles underground Hip Hop community. With an album Broken Silence commemorating the new side of The Narrator, RBX breaks the silence with HipHopDX about the past and future.

HipHopDX: My favorite song on your album Broken Silence, beside the fact that it’s produced by Snoop, is “Overdue.” What inspired it?
RBX: As an artist, I came into this Rap thing as just a kid with a dream. I never was trying to be a star. I just wanted to do what I do, and it blew up. Everything is large now. My whole world has changed. I was in the Death Row situation. Everybody thinks, “Okay, it’s beautiful and lovely, the success. You’re gonna get the nice car and the nice house.” Yeah, I have the nice car and I had the big house, but imagine the mafia being after you, ya dig? It was a blessing and a curse at the same time. Then I went underground.

“Overdue” is to let all my cats out there that’s doing things or just doing their music, and for whatever reason they didn’t blow up…“Overdue” is all my perseverance over the negative. It’s to stand up on my own two. In this rap industry. It’s not written, but this rap industry is like sororities, ya dig? I wouldn’t say fraternities, ‘cause that would be men. These people don’t act like men. They come off so hard with their personas, but on the interior, they act like women and girls. I’m not a part of any fraternity or sorority. I’m just one on an island. “Overdue” is my testimonial that if you stick to what you firmly believe in, and stay true to yourself, you can do it. I should have said this a while ago, but I was unable to ‘cause Suge [Knight] wouldn’t let me, and then there were other individuals that was blockin’, and now it’s overdue.

DX: You waited for turn, in ’92 with Death Row and again in ’96 with Aftermath. When you see all these artists in bigger artists’ entourages today, waiting for their turn, would you discourage them?
RBX: It worries me for them. They have probably been sprinkled with pixie dust and cinnamon spice, and that’s just not what it is. I think if somebody would have told me when I first started The Chronic what I would have gone through, I probably would not have gone down that road. But I’m so far down the road now, it’s too late to turn back. I feel sorry for them.

DX: This album really impressed me because you’re working with people like LMNO and DJ Rhettmatic – underground veterans. When you were placed in this ideal situation in ’91, ’92, albeit pixie dust, what kind of awareness did you have of the Los Angeles underground?
RBX: That’s all I know. I didn’t have any idea of the mainstream. That’s what threw me for a loop. I came up with The Good Life Café. That is Medusa, Myka 9, Aceyalone, Ganja K, P.E.A.C.E. All of those cats I just mentioned, any emcee that’s rapping today, they would split them. These are my peers at the time. That’s I knew was underground. So for me to work [LMNO], it’s only a throwback to where I started – my roots.

DX: You’re four or five albums deep. Why now are we seeing this?
RBX: I just think I’ve grown as a person and evolving as an artist. I grew up in the streets. I’m not a gang-banger. A gangster, maybe. Thuggish, yeah. But a gang-banger is something I’m not, and I’m not gonna put that face on like I’m out there smackin’ fools upside they head for havin’ on the wrong color. I’m not gonna perpetrate that fraud. That’s not me. But if you’re gonna run up on me and disrespect me in any kind of way, that’s when you’ve lost. That’s the hard edge of it. The main thing is, I wanted to come with a whole new sound and a whole new dynamic, if you will. These guys helped get me back in the studio and helped me get my mojo back. To help my out, I said I’m gonna have [these guys] on my record to give them a boost.

DX: These guys have carved their niches, which might differ from yours, outside of L.A. or The Good Life. Have you already felt new ears hearing your music as a result of this?
RBX: Yes. I am. I was at The Magic Show. This cat was a booth selling leather coats for a company called Iron Lions. I gave him a CD, just doing my thing. The brother called me back a week later, saying, “Brother, I had no idea. I knew you had a powerful voice, but I had no idea you had lyrics.” I was boxed in as a monster who comes in to clean up everything after everybody on the track. I’m the finisher. That’s still my role, but we have to go past that.

DX: Speaking of lyrics, you say, “I’m cousin of a Steeler, brother of a Raider.” Cool line on the surface, what’s it mean?
RBX: In Long Beach, there’s two gangs. There’s the Rolling 20 Crips, which wear Pittsburgh Steelers [merchandise] and there’s the Insane Crips, which wear Raiders [merchandise]. My brother is from Rolling 20s, but all my cousins are from the rival gang [The Insane Crips]. It’s a contradiction for me. I’m staying down with my brother ‘cause I am my brother’s keeper, but it puts me at odds with my cousins. It’s a daily struggle. I don’t get shot at. I don’t get tripped on, ‘cause I’m well-respected in my neighborhood, but there’s a tension there. These are rival gangs. That’s what I mean.

DX: What you just told me is something I didn’t know. But on top of it, those NFL teams are both homonyms. Steelers steal and Raiders raid, as in street action. Even Cam’ron, on his first album said, “I know a bunch of stealers, and they not from Pittsburgh.”
RBX: Yeah! It’s a way crazy twist. Sometimes I do things and God be in control. We think we in control, but God is still in control. Sometimes I do things, sit back and listen and say, “Wow. Whoa!” It’s one of things. A Steeler and a Raider are the same thing.

DX: Looking at a record like “Sunshine” or “Mama’s Crying,” your music has always been tinged with West Indian influence. Where does that come from?
RBX: I have bunch of cousins, and my sister as well, who have married cats from The West Indies. My nephew’s pops is from the Bahamas; I’m always around him. Trinidad & Tobago, Jamaica, this is my family. They all have accents. They got a lot of respect for me and vice-versa. It’s just been a natural progression, because that’s what I listen to. One of my aces back in the days, Bigga B, rest in peace – he was responsible for starting Loud Records and signing Xzibit and The Alkaholiks – that’s all he played: Dancehall, Ragamuffin, Roots. That’s become part of me. I’m not fakin’ nothin’.

DX: I remember buying No Mercy, No Remorse back in 1999 or 2000. It was two EPs. What was the thinking behind that?
RBX: I don’t even really remember. At that time, to be quite honest with you, I was in jail. One of my partners called me and said, “Listen man, you’ve got a bunch of music out here. You don’t need to sit.” I was being stubborn in jail too. I was fighting. Sometimes I just need to calm down. I be fighting too damn much, whether fisticuffs or demons. The guy said, “I’ll pay your fines off, we’ll get you out of there and get you to your classes.” I fought that for two weeks and then I said, “Go ‘head man, make it happen. I’m tired of eating sandwiches and cookies.” He made something happen; that was something he did. After that record came out, I went into real deep hiatus, just tryin’ to get it together. Then I started slowly emerging out of the darkness, and becoming myself again. It was a depressing time. I didn’t wanna keep bumping heads with Suge. I’m just one man. I don’t have the resources or the money to keep fighting these people, but for some strange reason, I just keep fighting.

DX: You were one of the first artists Dr. Dre signed to Aftermath. How do you think the label would have been different had he released you or King Tee before Eminem? How close was it?
RBX: It was a curse and it was a blessing. I don’t know why I get in situations like that. It was good ‘cause Dr. Dre was my partner, and I never had a problem with Dre at Death Row. As a matter of fact, Suge used to come in trippin’, and I used to look at Dre and he’d look at me like, “Here this motherfucker go.” When we got to Aftermath, I knew it was good ‘cause there was no more of that B.S. But new stress came in ‘cause now Dre had to prove himself and reinvent himself as Dr. Dre the entity [outside of] Death Row. He didn’t want to go down the same road he just came down; that’s why he came out with “Been There, Done That.”

I got into the twist ‘cause I was still getting up to do the music we did at Death Row. That’s where my mindstate was. Dre didn’t really want that. He wanted to step away for a minute, if not forever. At the time, I wasn’t able to go anywhere else but bang bang. I’m just telling you the truth. That’s when me and Dre became at odds. I was still going out in Compton or wherever, and I would see Suge. And we would bang. I was in the paint with him. We used to bang, bang. I didn’t know it at the time, but every time I’d get into it with Suge, he would make trouble for Dre. He couldn’t get at me, so he’d go and mess with Dre. He’d be calling Dre, or just making things miserable. Dre wasn’t telling me this. I needed to go calm down on deep hiatus and get my things together and stop fighting so much.

DX: You’re famous for spitting the same verse twice on two different songs. A.G. has been called out on this two. What’s your reasoning behind it?
RBX: A lot of people do weird shit on their records that you don’t know about. A lot of guys have “666” in a design that you can’t tell. One of my weird things is…if the verse is hot, I wanna rewind it selektah and bring it back! [in Jamaican accent]. It’s a remixed, re-edited version. On this album…I’m gonna be quite honest with you, the same lyrics are just an oversight. We just said, “Fuck it.” We gotta give the critics something to talk about. We’re just feeding the haters. I’m gonna do it again just to let you know that you ain’t said shit.

DX: I feel like “Stranded on Death Row” was the west coast answer to Marley Marl’s “The Symphony.” Tell me about that record, and was it really a battle of scrapping it out for top spot on Death Row?
RBX: To be quite honest with you, at that time, it was the terror dome. We was all pitbulls. [The Lady of Rage], I’m not gonna call her no bitch, but she was the lady pitbull. She would’ve chopped your ass the fuck up! She was so tight. You had to have a certain level of skill to even get Rage took at you. The first time she met me, she was looking at me like, “Dre done signed you? Can you spit?” I was looking like a dweeb, man. I was broke, I had just got off work, my glasses was broken with tape on them. When she heard me get down, all that respect came. Then she talked to me. Before then, I couldn’t even get Rage to say hi to me. It was the terror dome. You had to be writing, or cats was on your head instantly.

DX: Do you perform much?
RBX: Man, I would love to. When I fell out of the loop, I feel out of the loop with everything. I really don’t know no promoters. I don’t know too many cats. I’m hard to get to meet now – not that I’m scarred or wounded. Just most times, people are on that bullshit or got a certain angle they workin’. I don’t really be talkin’ to people. to answer your question, yes, I would love to.

To learn more visit: Myspace.com/RBXBrokenSilence



Prop LOUDsilence for the interview^^^^^^^ ;)




RBX reviews;

RBX review in The Source November 1995 NO.74



XXXXX


292 RBX; The RBX files reiew in Rap Pages October 1995



 


MediumL

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3002
  • Karma: 58
Anybody got the full NWA family tree pciture. its cut off at the end. Lookin at it reminds me how big an impact NWA has had on not only west coast hip hop but hip hop as a whole.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/DjGVAwyb454" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/DjGVAwyb454</a>
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
I jacked this from villain,so prop him  ;)
Rare Unseen NWA FOOTAGE - Live in concert, hotel, backstage - Must see for any1!
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=158470.msg1640848#msg1640848
I wish Ruthless or whoever owns the footage and recordings drop a mega DVD collection of everything NWA
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/oZ9ozr3DGxQ&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/oZ9ozr3DGxQ&amp;rel</a>
http://youtube.com/watch?v=oZ9ozr3DGxQ
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
Eazy-E on the news with the Compton Mayor for more go here; http://ruthlessfamily.wordpress.com/
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/juF8EtGSFWo&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/juF8EtGSFWo&amp;hl=en</a>

yellow brick road to compton? wonder if that ever got recorded?
« Last Edit: June 30, 2008, 12:57:54 AM by Chad Vader »
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
The author (Jake Brown) has simply stolen quotes straight from here and claimed itīs Mel-Man or itīs Mel-Man  :P.
You be the judge  ;)
A convo about if this is legit or not goes on here;
What happened to mellowman and who was he?
Quote
Dr. Dre in the Studio

22 used & new available from $7.25
http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Dre-Studio-Aftermath-Notorious/dp/0976773554/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214912624&sr=1-5
Detox,2006 and beyond...








« Last Edit: July 01, 2008, 11:13:48 AM by Chad Vader »
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
CPO



-Interviews;

CPO July 2008 interview

CPO interview by www. FACTORHOUSERECORDS1.COM video link
^^^Direct Video link^^^


Quote
CPO interview Slammin Video Mag Vol.2 1990
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/O2aHcxjCLVE&amp;rel" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/O2aHcxjCLVE&amp;rel</a>
Download link;
http://www.mediafire.com/?8wy9tgz1ndt

Quote
CPO interview in Hip Hop Connection October 1990. #21 LL Cool J cover.

Tales from the dark side
AT SIX FOOT TWO INCES AND 25 STONE,
Rapper Lil’ Nation is appropriately named.
“Almost as large as many small countries,” he’s as intimidating as his rhymes, as big as CPO’s beats.
Another native of the city of Compton, Lil’ Nation gave up a six year life of crime at the age of 18,
and – like his long time friend MC Ren – decided to go into music.
        CPO’s debut on Capitol, ‘To Hell And Black’, is another braze embodiment of West Coast gangster lifestyle,
and with tracks titled ‘Homicide’, ‘Gangsta Melody’, and ‘Ballad of a Menace’,
you’re left in no doubts of the content before the needle’s hit the deck.
Produced by Ren, it’s a grinding, 10-track soundtrack to street violence
– nothing new, but another chapter in the annals of realism rap that contrasts so starkly with East Coast consciousness.
How did the name CPO – Capitol Punishment Organization – come about?
   “We where sitting around talking about how we where not down with oppression, not down white supremacy,” he explains.
“Oppression was the main thing – the biggest wrong that we could think of,
we needed the biggest pain we could think of – capitol punishment  of that wrong.
So the Capitol Punishment Organization was born.”
     Lil’ Nation kept telling Ren he could Rap, but the NWA emcee refused to believe him.
Until one day, Ren accidently heard one of Lil’ Nation’s tracks – “Ren started producing me that day!” he exclaims.
      On the whole, ‘To Hell And Black’ is a measured but funky affair, with only a couple of tracks matching the aggression of the lyrics.
To the churning backbeats, Lil’ Nation fires his incendiary raps in uncompromising terms.
“I consider it fun to smoke a nigger with a gun” and “With no hesitation I put a gun to your head and blast it” (’Gangsta Melody’)
       That song in particular is a musical incarnation of life here in Compton,” he says.
“You won’t have a problem shooting me, I won’t have a problem shooting you – it’s that simple.
Compton is not nice place to live, it’s not even a nice place to visit at some times.
I think that people are starting to believe that Compton is a tourist spot!
But every night somebody gets killed. It’s a real hard life.”
       Lil’ Nation acknowledges that CPO’s graphic portrayal of street life is at odds with the positivity of likes of KRS-One, but says;
“People from the East Coast – like KRS-One – are speaking knowledge, speaking politics, which are things we don’t know, but things should know. What we’re doing on this side is speaking about what we do know, which is living in a violent environment.
There are conflicts, but there’s truth in what we do.”
       The track ‘CPOsis’ is, he explains, “the musical incarnation of CPO”, relating an implacable  theory about dealing with white supremacy.
“If the Aryan Nation comes up against CPO, they’ll be coming up dead,” he says.
“I think we’re starting to confront white supremacy on a head to head basis.
The only way we’re going to get rid of oppression in any shape, form or fashion is to deal with it
– abolish it – by some type of confrontation, a violent confrontation.
Hopefully, it won’t have to be a physical confrontation, and hopefully we can just do it with words.”
      But do you really believe your lyrics are a good way towards verbal reconciliation?
“I think so. To me, you got to get people to listen.
Once you can talk to them about whatever you want to talk to them about.
I think this is the first step towards some kind of movement.”
      So are you saying your records are positive?
“I think something controversial is going to come out of my records, I don’t think anything positive will happen.
I’m trying to stir the public up to the point where they have to confront me, and ask what’s going on, so I can let them know.”
      Violence and revolution aren’t curious bedfellows, but Lil’ Nation must be an eternal optimist to believe the established order will view his efforts as progressive. He’ll get the attention, sure, but as for anything else…?
      Would he like to remain part of the growing Ruthless family?
“Oh definitely! Capitol are just distributing it, but it’s out on Ren Records.
I like where Ruthless started out, I like how it started out, and where it’s going.”
      As well as his right hand man, DJ Train, Lil’ Nation also worked with the group FOE on ‘To Hell And Black’.
Look out for their own release soon, again on Ren Records.



-Reviews;

CPO; To Hell and Black review Hip Hop Connection October 1990,issue 21. LL Cool J cover



-Audio;

Quote
Rare stuff from CPO’s debut you should check out:
-Ballad Of A Menace (Homicidal Theme Remix) Super dope!
Produced by MC Ren, Co-Produced by Young Dee
http://www.zshare.net/audio/28818341f9568b/
-This beat is funky (Mo better Funky Remix) also super dope!
http://www.zshare.net/audio/28818255c30db6/
Produced by MC Ren
-The Movement (Remix)
http://www.zshare.net/audio/2881816b498f16/
Produced by MC Ren

These songs appears on promo singles from the album.

BONUS;
EA-Ski featuring MC Ren and CPO; The Format From EA-Skiīs Past and Present
http://www.mediafire.com/?1x0cd2gnly2
Gangsta Funk (ft. E-40, B-Legit, CPO Boss Hogg & Mike Marshall) (Past & Present)
http://www.mediafire.com/?7j04jz0jby5
EA-Ski featuring MC Ren and CPO; The Format From EA-Skiīs Past and Present
http://www.mediafire.com/?1x0cd2gnly2
Prime - Pray Ave. (ft. Big Wy, CPO Boss Hogg, and Bokey) [Produced by Dae One]
http://www.dubcnm.com/audio/2007/december/prime_ft._big_wy_cpo_boss_hogg_and_bokey-pray_ave-(dubcnn).mp3
E-A-Ski (ft. CPO Boss Hogg) - Bag Of Chips
http://download.yousendit.com/152CB2556AA16CC5
Sip of the Duce

http://www.amazon.com/Sip-Duce/dp/B000003BYG/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1198449117&sr=1-1
10 used & new available from $2.98
11 Prodigy Of A Nigga.mp3 featuring CPO produced by Torture Chamber (He donīt rap on it,just some talking in the end.)
http://www.mediafire.com/?gnws6mvryyt


-Videos;

Quote
The Video for 'Ballad Of A Mencace' featuring MC Ren
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UxmHIRvxR9c" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UxmHIRvxR9c</a>



-Resume;

Quote
CPO’s resume:
www.discogs.com/artist/C.P.O.?anv=CPO
www.discogs.com/artist/DJ+Train
www.discogs.com/artist/MC+Ren

Discogs.com ain’t a complete data base, but it is a start.

Be sure to also check the Vault on this site.
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=94395.0
« Last Edit: July 15, 2008, 07:14:44 AM by tusken RAIDEr »
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
INTERVIEW FROM THA SHACK WITH TOMICA WRIGHT:
http://www.eazy-ecpt.com/compton/index.php?topic=10718.0

Tomica Wright: I cannot confirm 50 –60 unreleased tracks by Eazy. Completed or started. But it is possible there were that many tracks submitted. Some songs were completed; some songs with scratch vocals and some just concepts.


Tha Shack: Are the remaining tracks in Ruthless’s possession? If so, how many? If not, who has them?

Tomica Wright: Some tracks are in Ruthless’s possession, the master copies of at least 8 songs are missing. Majority of the unreleased material was used for the last two Eazy –E projects. We are not certain who has our property.

Tha Shack: In an article published by GQ magazine in 1995, it mentions, “Shortly after Eazy’s death, police locked the doors to Ruthless Records to protect tapes and videos, which were beginning to disappear.” Is this true? If so, does this include Eazy-E unreleased material, and what was recovered if any?

Tomica Wright: It is true that shortly after Eric passed Ruthless Records doors were on lockdown, no one was allowed to enter the premises. The missing tracks have not been recovered.



Tha Shack: Did Ruthless keep a record log of masters owned prior to Eazy’s death?

Tomica Wright: Yes, of completed work.

Tha Shack: I’ll just mention a few unreleased items. Please tell me anything that comes to mind, any updates, etc.:

Tha Shack: Eazy has mentioned in interviews that he did a song with Guns N’ Roses.

Tomica Wright: Yes, we only have a rough copy of the song, which was not completed. Good track!

Tha Shack: Eazy has mentioned doing a song called “Yellow Brick Road to Compton”. A positive song for Compton that was agreed upon with the mayor of Compton in order for Eazy to shoot the “Real Compton City Gs” video. Any update on this one?

Tomica Wright: I am aware of the working title, rough ideas and some scratch vocals were laid, but song was not completed.

Tha Shack: “Everything I Luv” Snippet was supposedly posted on Eazy’s 1-900 hotline.

Tomica Wright: We only have a cassette copy of the song. Not completed

Tha Shack: There were rumors that the SleepWalkers track on Bone’s Collection vol. 2 originally had a longer Eazy verse dissing Dre and Snoop. Will we ever get to hear the original?

Tomica Wright: The original version of the song did include Eazy’s vocals, which were erased in a session with Bone. Not sure if the verse dissed Dre or Snoop.

Tha Shack: What was the name of the Eazy-E track that was to be on the “Dark Blue” Soundtrack?

Tomica Wright: It was supposed to be one of the songs, which was used for the “Impact of a Legend” project. “Dark Blue” was supposed to come out before the “Impact of a Legend” project. Unfortunately, the project kept getting pushed back, so we just licensed music for the movie. The movie didn’t pull enough demand as a theatrical release to warrant a soundtrack. It had a better response DVD.


ha Shack: Was the album “Str8 Off Tha Streetz of Muthaphukkin Compton vol. 2” ever completed? If not, how come we have seen release dates for it?

Tomica Wright: Originally, this was the working title for a double album. Eric wanted to release. (”Str8 Off “Tha Streetz of Muthaphukkin Compton” Vol 1 and 2). Since he was taking so long to release another project after “Dre187 It’s On”. He had a good amount of songs, concepts and ideas laid out and started, but not everything was completed. Not sure why volume 2 release dates appeared.


Tha Shack: Does/Did Ruthless own any unreleased N.W.A. tracks?

Tomica Wright: To my knowledge no. Masters old masters would be property of EMI, but if you are referring to just the music (tracks) None that I am aware of.

MY SOURCE:

http://www.eazy-ecpt.com/compton/index.php?topic=10718.0
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
Re: The ultimate N.W.A family interview thread *magazine scans,reviews etc.*
« Reply #174 on: August 02, 2008, 09:38:45 AM »
to work on some verses for Detox.  This occurred within the last 2 weeks or so.   :-*  :)

Ice Cube interview Talks about Detox,Ren,Yella,Eazy,NWA
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/bdoHNQKHsjY&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/bdoHNQKHsjY&amp;hl=en</a>

Ren; They text back and forth all the time
Yella; They was supposed to something a couple of months ago
Dre; Dre has asked him to drop some verses for Detox
Eazy; He labeled us The World Most Dangerous group,bla,bla,bla....