Author Topic: My phone > iPhone (Now: My phone = iPhone)  (Read 21725 times)

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #425 on: March 08, 2008, 11:47:42 AM »
^ The Apple business model works... just not for the author of that piece.  Some people just don't get it.

People want the iPhone.  It is in high demand.  I am seeing them pop up everywhere... just like the iPod did back in 2002.

Sure it´s a success,damn near all my friends got one or is getting one.
But then again most of my friends got a MAC,some of them is fanatic MAC fans.

3rd party developers see this demand and want to cash in by making some cool apps.
Apple releases the SDK and its tools, but makes them Mac only.
If you want to cash in, you have to do it on a Mac.  Don't have a Mac?
You will have to buy one if you want to cash in.  What does this equal?  More sales, exposure, and money for Apple.

Apple ain´t the only one to make quality products  ;)
(PS; I got a MAC-Book and love it.... but still  ;) :P)

Now why would Apple want to open up itself to competition
by licensing the OS to others when Apple makes money off the phone... not the OS... the phone.
Microsoft makes their money from software sales.  Apple does it by selling hardware.
The software (the iPhone OS) is the carrot... it attracts customers.  Then Apple sells you the hardware (the iPhone itself).

Yeah,but I think the author is also talking about expanding their portfolio.
Not everyone likes touch screen,including me.
I had SE P800 and SE P900,I´m tired of touch screen...
sure it allows you to have a bigger screen,but right now I prefer a regular keypad,nothing fancy (rock Nokia N82 at the moment)


Just look at how SE rebuild their name when they released at the time revolutinary phone P800,
not everyone could afford it,but it got a lot of press and was known as the "best" phone at the time.
For the ones that couldn´t afford it or thought that the phone was a little too "big" bought other phone´s in their portfolio.
So what I think he´s saying is that,they can´t assume that one model will fit all you know.
There´s probably cats like me that is attracted to the OS,but not the design as it is at the present time.
I want a keypad and I want at least all the specs that I got on the phone I got the moment.  ;)
I don´t think that´s too much to ask for,or is it?  :P ;)
 

E. J. Rizo

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #426 on: March 10, 2008, 08:46:15 AM »
There seems to also be a likewise minor change to the iPhone's iTunes Store icon. What we see is an iTunes Store icon with a musical note graphic, as opposed to the current "download arrow" graphic. I agree with Doc when he says that the new iTunes Store icon may be a misguided move. The iTunes Store represents Music, TV shows, and movies - not just music. A "download arrow" is better suited to the iTunes Store's function than a musical note.

well the iTunes Store on the iPhone is only for Music it doesnt let you buy or rent movies or tv shows or anything else... so i guess that works just fine... also considering that the iTunes logo on the app for both mac and pc are a CD with a music Note I dont see it as a problem.

and from the feel and look of it they are going to have an APP store and they already have the iTunes Music Store .... i wouldnt doubt they put out maybe a "Video" store on the iphone where you can get TV Shows, Movies, Music Videos and so forth... just a thought.

iPhone is about to really start taking it to all the smart phones out there come June.
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #427 on: March 13, 2008, 11:45:11 AM »
new crazy phones


I found a site
( www.globalsourcesdirect.com )
that sell some crazy ass phones.... some of them looks interesting  ;)

Quote
Analog TV Slide-Screen Cell Phones
http://www.globalsourcesdirect.com/servlet/the-4561/Analog-TV-Slide-dsh-Screen-Cell/Detail





Wholesale Analog TV Slide-Screen Cell Phones
This analog-TV receiving cell phone features an innovative slide-opening 2.8-inch touch-screen display, in addition to dual-band frequency operation, MP3/MP4/3GP playback, and a 1.3MP camera. It also features a very unique counterfeit currency detector that your customers will find intriguing. It measures 118 x 56 x 20mm in size and comes in silver and white.

This item will ship out in 5-7 working days upon payment confirmation.

Specifications:
Network: 900/1800 MHz
Language: English, Chinese
Screen: 2.8-inch TFT touch screen
Music support: MP3 and backstage player, equalizer, dual speakers
Video support: 3GP, MP4 video full-screen playback
Camera: 1.3MP
Memory and storage: microSD card up to 1GB
Special Feature: counterfeit currency detector
^^^ :o :o :P :-X :laugh: :laugh: ^^
Dimensions: 118 x 56 x 20mm
Weight: 125g
Color: silver, white
Warranty period: 3 months
In retail packaging

Standard Certification:
Not available

Individual Unit Packages Include:
Cell phone x 1
microSD card x 1
Battery x 2
Headset x 1
Data transfer cable x 1
User Manual CD-Rom x 1
Charger x 1

Export Case Details:
1 unit per carton
Size: 21 x 14 x 11cm
Weight: 0.5kg
Back to top
Wholesale Analog TV Slide-Screen Cell Phones
SKU: Z0DJX-71923
Per Unit Price: US$168.52
Wholesale case of 1 Units for US$168.52


Quote
Dual-Band GSM Cell Phone Watches
http://www.globalsourcesdirect.com/servlet/the-4566/Dual-dsh-Band-GSM-Cell-Phone/Detail




Wholesale Dual-Band GSM Cell Phone Watches
These GSM cell phone watches sport a fashionable design, 1.3-inch touch-screen display, 1.3MP digital camera, and operate on GSM 900/1,800MHz frequencies. Additional features include MP3/MP4 playback, 2GB microSD card support, and Bluetooth connectivity. Coming with a Bluetooth headset, this is truly one versatile watch.

This item will ship out in 5-7 working days upon payment confirmation.

Specifications:
Network: GSM 900/1800MHz
Interface language: Chinese, English, French, Russian, Arabic, Vietnamese
SIM card: unlocked
Screen: 1.3-inch touch screen
Camera: 1.3MP
Multimedia: MP3/MP4 file playback
GPRS support
Bluetooth: A2DP
Color: Black/White
Product dimension: 64 x 45 x 18mm
Product weight: 56g
Warranty period: Six months
In retail packaging

Standard Certification:
Not available

Individual Unit Packages Include:
Cell phone x 1
Stylus x 1
Battery x 2
Micro SD card x 1
Headset x 1
Data transfer cable x 1
Watch band x 1
User manual x 1
Bluetooth headset x 1
Bluetooth charger cable x 1
Charger x 1

Export Case Details:
1 unit per carton
Size: 21 x 14 x 11cm
Weight: 0.5kg
Back to top
Wholesale Dual-Band GSM Cell Phone Watches
SKU: Z7IJX-71915
Per Unit Price: US$155.30
Wholesale case of 1 Units for US$155.30

I will assume that it got a REALLY LOAD speaker...  :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:


Quote
3.5 Inch Screen Dual SIM TV Cell Phone
http://www.globalsourcesdirect.com/servlet/the-4063/3.5-Inch-Screen-Dual-SIM-TV-Cell-Phone/Detail








Wholesale 3.5 Inch Screen Dual SIM TV Cell Phone
This Dual SIM card TV Cell Phone has a build-in analog TV and FM radio receiver, and a super large 3.5-inch TFT LCD for watching TV programs and MP4 files. The phone also has dual-SIM card slot, build-in 9 languages support, and can handle 180 to 300 minutes of talk time, and offers standby time of 200 to 240 hours with a 3500 mAH Lithium battery support.

Analog TV function may not work correctly in the following countries due to SECAM video format inconsistencies: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Egypt, Hungary, Iran, Iraq, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Ukraine.

This item will ship out 5-7 working days upon payment confirmation.

In mobile phones, dual-band and tri-band refer to functionality that allows a cell phone to support either two or three frequency bands out of the four major GSM (TDMA) bands - 850/900/1800/1900 MHz.
GSM 900/1800 bands work in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Brazil
GSM 900/1800/1900 bands will work on at least one network in most countries around the world except for some networks that only support 850MHz.

Please do check with your local service provider on the frequency for your country.

Specifications:
Network: GSM 900/1800 MHz dual-band
Analog TV receiver: Yes, compatible to use in the following countries: Afghanistan, Argentina, Brazil, Cambodia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, Taiwan, Turkey, UAE, UK, Vietnam, Western Europe, and other countries using compatible TV system as these countries.
FM radio receiver: Yes
Interface language: English/French/Spanish/Portugal/Italian/Russian/Arabic/Vietnam/Thai
SIM card: Dual card; single-working; unlocked for use with your existing service provider's SIM card
Screen: Super large 3.5 inch, 320x240 pixels, 262K color TFT LCD
Touch screen with handwriting: Yes
Camera: 1.3 mega pixel dual camera
Multimedia: MP3/MP4 file playback, up to 2GB Micro SD card extension support.
GPRS support: Yes
Bluetooth support: Yes
Special Features: Super long standby.
Talking time:180-300 minutes
Standby time:200-240 hours
In retail packaging
Warranty period: 3 months

Standard Certification:
Not available

Package Includes:
Cell phone x 1
Battery x 2 (3500mAh Lithium)
^^^^ :o :o :o :P :P  :o :o^^^^
Headset x 1
Data transfer cable x 1
Charger x 1
256MB T-Flash card x 1

Export Carton:
1 unit per carton
Size: 22x16x5 cm
Weight: 0.5 kg

* Shipping date is estimated only. Actual date may vary slightly.
Back to top
Wholesale 3.5 Inch Screen Dual SIM TV Cell Phone
SKU: Z70121-71474
Per Unit Price: US$143.00
Wholesale case of 1 Units for US$143.00


There´s plenty of more crazy phone´s;
http://www.globalsourcesdirect.com/servlet/the-Cell-Phones-cln-Other-Cell-Phones/start/1/total/64/Categories



Quote
Okids phone concept for kids
http://www.mobile-review.com/fullnews/main/index_eng.shtml


Song-kyu Nam has created a mobile phone concept called Okids. It is designed for kids aged 5-6. The device looks like a toy and it can be transformed from a sleek candybar to a heart form (symbolizes love to kids) and vice a versa. Colored in bright blue the shell contains several big buttons and a game console on the rear panel of the heart form. There is also a small color display, which reveals contact name or number and even simple games.


Quote
Check the battery on this one  :o :o :o :o :o
http://www.solomobi.com/viewproduct.asp?pro_id=1361






Hot Spots
  1.dual sim work one  by one
  2. Bluetooth 2.0
  3. Hand writing & key input
  4.Four speakers good music
  5. 16800 mAh battery super long standby
 ^^^^^ :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o ^^^^
  6: MP3,MP4
  7.e-book reader
  8.Dual camera,web-camera
  9.english /chinese
 
 Features
   1. 3.5 inch, , 260K  colour; PX: 240×320px
   3. T-Flash Card Supporting,256MB for free
   4.0.3 Mega pixel camera for Picture & Video capability, 640*480
   5. Double Stereo Loud speaker, 64 chord ring tone
   6. MP3 & MP4 player
   7. GPRS & WAP connectivity, MMS Transceiver
   8. U disk support function to keep the information storage
   9. Bluetooth2.0
   10.calendar,To do list,Alarm,World Clock,Spotwatch
   11.caller picture,caller Ring Tone,
   12.Telephone directories: 300 groups of contacts, support incoming call with big head  sticker,
group ring an Messages &Multimedia messaging: 200 SMS, support MMS; can use downloaded MP3 as SMS rings
   13. Schedule power on/off: support to start/close under set time
   14. Alarm clock:5 groups, support alarm clock when machine’s closed, can set from Monday to Sunday
   15. Games: 2 built-in common games,
   16. More information: MP3, MP4, Handsfree, SMS group sending,
Voice recorder, WAP, Handwritten + keyboard input, Bluetooth, GPRS download,
MMS, Memory extended,  IP dialing, self-designed ringtones, photo editor, alarm clock, calculator, notepad, health management .....


WTF!!!! One crazy ass battery  :o :o :o :o :o :o ^^^^^
« Last Edit: March 26, 2008, 04:27:32 PM by tusken RAIDEr - CEO of The Dangerous Crew Movement »
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #428 on: March 26, 2008, 04:40:16 PM »
There seems to also be a likewise minor change to the iPhone's iTunes Store icon. What we see is an iTunes Store icon with a musical note graphic, as opposed to the current "download arrow" graphic. I agree with Doc when he says that the new iTunes Store icon may be a misguided move. The iTunes Store represents Music, TV shows, and movies - not just music. A "download arrow" is better suited to the iTunes Store's function than a musical note.

well the iTunes Store on the iPhone is only for Music it doesnt let you buy or rent movies or tv shows or anything else...
so i guess that works just fine... also considering that the iTunes logo on the app for both mac and pc are a CD with a music Note I dont see it as a problem.

and from the feel and look of it they are going to have an APP store and they already have the iTunes Music Store ....
i wouldnt doubt they put out maybe a "Video" store on the iphone where you can get TV Shows, Movies, Music Videos and so forth... just a thought.

How a icon look or is placed is a minor detail  :P
So I don´t really see any problem with this either,I don´t really download music direct on my phone  :P.
But it´s probably a good business move  ;).
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #429 on: March 26, 2008, 04:50:40 PM »
News

Quote
Sling updating SlingPlayer Mobile for Windows Mobile,symbian and iPhone possible
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/03/17/sling-updating-slingplayer-mobile-for-windows-mobile-nokia-n95-8gb-uiq-iphone-possible.html



Place-shifting TV programs never had it so good. Sling has announced that they'll be releasing an updated version of their SlingPlayer for Windows Mobile devices this Spring. WinMo fans rocking a SlingBox at home and SlingPlayer Mobile on their handset can look forward to optimization for newer Windows Mobile devices (both touchscreen and non-touchscreen).

Sling will also be optimizing their Nokia N95 8GB client and has plans to bring the SlingPlayer Mobile to UIQ.

Most interesting is Sling's mention of the possibility of bringing SlingPlayer Mobile to the iPhone. We've heard rumblings of SlingPlayer coming to the iPhone, but this announcement makes the possibility all the more credible. Now, streaming a SlingBox's feed over an EDGE network is possible (the video stream is automatically adjusted depending on the available bandwidth), but it would be an injustice to the iPhone's beautiful display to watch TV in low-res. Of course, the more pressing problem is Sling's use of a WMV video feed instead of the H.264 encoding that iPhones love so much. Let's hope both those problems get worked out soon.
Hey, Sling, give us iPhone owners any kind of Sling-support and we'll be happy. We'll deal with low-res TV feeds for now - until Apple gets real with the 3G iPhone, that is.

[Via: Gizmodo]


Quote
Apple working on iPhone flip? Patent application details flip-phone with dual-sided multi-touch.
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/03/17/apple-working-on-iphone-flip-patent-application-details-flip-phone-with-dual-sided-multi-touch.html


Apple's first foray into the mobile space has been a terrific success. And, not just as the company's first-ever handset offering, the iPhone has succeeded in an entrenched and competitive handset market.

Still, Apple's a bit of a one-trick pony with their iPhone. They've only got one form-factor with one model (different storage capacities notwithstanding). So, what could Cupertino do to throw some variety into the mix? Make an iPhone Flip, of course.

The latest patent application to surface at the USPTO indicates that Apple is at least considering a flip-phone form-factor for their iPhone. Entitled, "Dual sided trackpad," the patent application describes a method whereby a device's capacitance touch sensor panel and display panel are located on separate halves of the flip. The upper portion serves as a display, which isn't really innovative. But, and here's the innovative part, the lower portion of the flip is a transparent touchpad with dual-sided capacitance touch technology. Unwired View's Photoshop rendering shows off this idea beautifully.





What does that mean exactly? Well, imagine being able to view the device's main display with the flip closed - being translucent, the lower flip doesn't obscure the display. And, the dual-sided capacitance touch flip works while in the closed position (overlayed on the display).

Then imagine that you've got the flip open. The dual-sided nature of the flip allows for an entirely new world of multi-touch gestures - the front side of the flip could be used for certain inputs in tandem with the back side of the flip. Or, maybe you want to "draw" the phone number onto the flip. That would work too. Of course, the flip will still function as a standard numeric keypad.



The possibilities are endless, especially for laptop trackpads and tablet computers. But, it all hinges on Apple's decision to go forward with the tech in this patent application. And iPhone Nano with this dual-sided trackpad technology would probably do quite well among those potential iPhone users that really want a smaller form-factor, not to mention those that just want a clamshell. Fingers crossed…

[Via: Unwired View]

I personally don´t like flip or slide phones.
I prefer classic bar styled phone´s,but this looks like a good concept idea for a iPhone flip phone.
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #430 on: March 29, 2008, 05:06:56 PM »
News

Quote
Samsung i780, HTC TyTn II, Eten X600, Nokia N95 GPS test
http://www.gpspassion.com/fr/articles.asp?id=175&page=8

Samsung i780, HTC TyTn II, Eten X600, Nokia N95

INTRODUCTION
GPS is everywhere these days and particularly in PDAPhones or Smartphones, no mean feat since there are significant constraints to cram in all the "connected technologies" in these ever more compact devices, GSM, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, a bright screen. Needless to say RF interference runs rampant and a high sensitivity GPS chipset is a requirement. Until last year there was only one player, SiRF, with the powerful SiRFstarIII chipset released in early 2005. The other original high sensitivity chipsets by uBlox, NemeriX, MTK, SkyTraq, have not cracked the connected device world yet, but Qualcomm's and TI's have and will be used in this comparison, thanks to the GSM/WiFi integration for the former and to Nokia's decision for the latter.

While some will argue that a chipset must be judged on a test bench to remove problems with the design of the device, at the end of the day, what matters is the user experience and real life side by side comparisons of actual devices are the best way to get an idea of what it is. The line-up for this article is as follows :
- Eten X600 - SiRFstar3lt
- HTC TyTn II - Qualcomm MSM7200
- Nokia N95 8Gb - TI v3
- Samsung i780 - Qualcomm MSM6200

1. ACQUISITION
To overcome the reduced signal fed to the chips by the diminutive GPS antennas, all these PDAPhones have some form of A-GPS, "Ephemeris AGPS" for the X600 with SiRFInstantFixI and the HTC TyTn II with gpsOneXtra, and MS-Based for the Nokia N95 (supl Nokia) and the Samsung i780 (supl Orange). As a result, warm TTFF is obtained in less than ten seconds. For the purposes of this comparison, all the systems were left to "settle" for 10 minutes in the open to remove the impact of these various forms of AGPS

2. ACCURACY - RAW TRACKS
Driving around the high rise buildings of the budding business complex of Noisy le Grand is a good way to gauge the accuracy of the various systems :

A. Overview


B. Zoom #1


B. Zoom #2


B. Zoom #3



3. SIGNAL LEVEL
In addition to the qualitative approach of analyzing the raw tracks, the quantitative analysis of the signal levels obtained from the NMEA can be useful to explain some observations.



No surprise here, the ultra-slim form factor of the i780 likely forced Samsung to use a thin PIFA antenna and as a result the Qualcomm chipset has the lowest signal level to work with. This certainly explains the degraded accuracy of the i780 compared to the HTC TyTn II, also Qualcomm based. Or it could be that the MSM7200 chipset offers improved performance compared to the MSM6200 of the Samsung.

4. FINAL WORDS
Apart from the TI equipped N95 that doesn't recover from the multipath rich passage under and between high rise buildings, the overall performance is very good in light of the constraints of building GPS into the devices. The Qualcomm based Samsung i780 and HTC TyTn II offer good results as long as the conditions are not extreme with a slight advantage for the TyTn II, but the SiRFstar3lt based Eten X600 remains the best performer, being able to handle all types of environments, including pedestrian use as seen in this comparison. Whether this is due to SiRF's expertise in navigation software for high sensitivity chipsets honed in the field since early 2005 or to the better design of the Eten X600 is hard to say, probably a bit of both. It will be interesting to see if the new SiRFprima platform with what looks like a SiRFstarIV chipset is included on upcoming PDAPhones.



Quote
Hands-on with Nokia N96
http://www.mobile-review.com/review/nokia-n96-en.shtml

Table of contents:
Positioning
Design, size, controls
Display
Keypad
Battery
Memory
Hardware specifications
USB, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
Music department
Mobile television
Impressions
Sales package:
Handset
Li-Ion battery (BL-5F)
USB data cable (CA-101)
TV cable (CA-75U)
Remote control and headphones (AD-54, HS-45)
Car charger (DC-4)
Charger (AC-5)
Positioning

As a rule, the average consumer’s thought pattern isn't characterized by sophistication or depth – all he cares to consider when choosing a phone is index and functionality. Take the Nokia N95 for example – it is a do-it-all flagship, so the average Joe readily assumes the device that has one rung added to its index, specifically, the N96, should outdo the previous offering in every single way. The logic seems solid at a glance, but as we go deeper into the N96, it loses a fair share of its soundness.

Nokia has a clear-cut goal: to roll out a variety of solutions in order to settle down in different niches and for this they need similarly styled phones that pack in unique feature sets. Being resembling design-wise helps offerings that stand close together within the range appear identical to those who buy this trick, even though as far as philosophy and hardware are concerned, they couldn’t be more polarized. Basically, that’s the story of the Nokia N96 that got stuck with the “flagship” title, so now it is considered as the best S60-based solution around, which is not how things really stand. Effectively, it is a niche product that’s meant to open the range of similarly featured solutions, a feeler, if you like – dubbing an all-round new solution that hasn’t stood the test of time yet “the flagship” is somewhat reckless. Moreover, Nokia has never done such thing, but gossips care very little about that.




Nokia’s portfolio offers a couple of DVB-H capable solutions, specifically the Nokia N77 and a more dated phone, the N92. Neither of them was widely available, since they were used either in pilot television projects or tailored for particular regions (like the N77 in Taiwan, starting late fall 2007). Indeed, given that the vast majority of markets still have no DVB-H television enabled, a replica of the N73, yet armed with this functionality, was uncalled for. In March 2008, the European authorities standardized on DVB-H and from this point on will put in their efforts to support it. In this sense the Nokia N96 has a good chance to avoid the role of an ugly duckling that will never see release – thankfully, mobile television isn’t a big focus in the N96, it is rather included among all other things there.

Much like other Nseries-branded solutions, the N96 is heavy on multimedia, and delivers especially with its video department. There is a handful of things going for it – the display diagonal, hardware support for H.264 decoding, speedier videos and a folding stand that allows having the N96 on flat surfaces at a video-friendly angle.





Interestingly, over a year ago Nokia started to enhance its product portfolio not only by varying styles, but also hardware platform underpinning their solutions. The Nokia N95 and its follow-ups built upon the TI OMAP chip, while the N96 takes advantage of STMicroelectronics’s Nomadik. So when comparing these two phones, their similarities don’t go beyond physical aspects, since other things, like functionality and hardware, are quite different.

Is the N96 a mass-market solution? No. Then, is it heavily specialized, aiming at one particular niche? No. It is rather somewhere in between. This phone will see moderate sales, although the fuss around it will easily shadow its modest numbers.

Back to the table of contents >>>
Design, size, controls

Visually, the N96 is very much like the Nokia N81 8 Gb – same black finish with glossy surfaces, same controls, with a little bit of silver along the sides, making for a pretty seducing mix. The front face is extremely easy to soil with fingerprints and smudge; basically, it gets so dirty in a matter of minutes that a cleaning cloth becomes a must-have for its owners.





The phone measures in at 103x55x18 mm (125 grams) plus the camera part is even thicker due the rim around the lens that adds a couple of millimeters to the N96’s girth. On the whole, the N96 looks and feels more like some sort of shovel in the hand due to being quite wide – compared with the Nokia N81 it has gotten 0,5cm wider. While it is not a solution for women in any way, it is more about whether or not shop assistants will manage to convince them that it is the flagship solution. As far as I remember, the Nokia N93 wasn’t all that petite either, notwithstanding, women happily went for it and carried it around in their purses, and furthermore, some are still using it. It is important to realize that the Nokia N96’s dimensions are as close to the maximum as it get – its pocket-stretching casing won’t fit just about any jacket or trousers. Some may well argue with me on this, and I will readily agree that some types of clothes are perfect for the N96; but for the most part, it will not please you with its portability.









Perched on the top end is the keypad lock slider, the same as that found in the Nokia N81, along with the 3.5 mm headphones jack and power button. Sitting on the left-hand spine is the microSD memory card slot covered by a plastic flap. Things get more interesting on the right side, where you will find two speakers under a metal grill, as well as the camera button and volume rocker. The bottom edge houses the microUSB socket and charger slot (2 mm).




Form-factor wise, the N96 is a dual slider that can be pushed both up and down – that is, in the latter case you gain access to the phone’s music-minded controls that also kick in when watching video. The buttons here, unlike the Nokia N95 8Gb, aren’t bulging – they are flat and made of the same plastic as the handset’s face.








As far as the build quality is concerned, the jury is still out – the prototypes we played around with were nothing special, to put it mildly, so they gave little idea of how the N96 was really put together. Some time ago we experienced the same thing with the Nokia N81 – when I had my first hands-on session with it, I thought its build quality was horrendous. But then I spent some time with a commercial unit and found that it felt pretty solid and had no trace of its past problems left. And I really can’t think why they would make an exception for the Nokia N96 and leave it as it is today.




Nested on the rear side are the LED flash, lens of a 5 Mpix CMOS camera (which is in effect identical to the Nokia N95) with autofocus. As of today, the camera doesn’t work properly, as the software is still pretty crude (well, it does take shots, but I couldn’t find one person who would like them).

Mounted around the lens rim is a folding stand that allows for a video-friendly setup when you put the N96 on a flat surface. It is pretty handy in use and reliable at that – at least, I pressed, pushed and abused the N96 in all possible ways when the stand was out and still couldn’t break it. The models to come will also enjoy this useful detail.




Display

The handset comes bundled with a QVGA 2.8-inch display (240x320 pixels, 42x58 mm). Its 16 million colors and sufficient brightness make for an easy-to-read picture. While in the sun, the display gets washed out, yet remains perfectly legible.





The N96’s diagonal is a clear improvement over the original N95 and its 2,6 inches (which is also quite a difference compared to other 2- and 2,2-inch units). The increased diagonal normally brings about a more blurry image, however thanks to the N96’s brighter display, you will hardly notice this effect.



The display accommodates up to 8 text and up to 3 service lines. In some modes, though, you may get up to 14 text lines. All fonts are sharp and easy to read.

Back to the table of contents >>>
Keypad

Similarly to the N81, the Nokia N96 employs the Navy Wheel. There is a smallish mechanical button with its edges sitting slightly above the surface. Honestly, I didn’t find it a joy to use. It is also flanked by music controls, which is the same control cluster you will see on the N96’s remote. But that’s not the most interesting thing about it. The fact of the matter is that this device utilizes touch-based navigation, so you can scroll though your gallery and music library by sweeping your finger around the navigation button (direction doesn’t matter – if it’s clockwise, then you’ll be scrolling down). Nevertheless, it is not an essential or vital touch, that’s why by default it is disabled in the menu, which is the right thing. Speaking of the drawbacks, we experienced way too many mispresses on the music controls, especially those on the squashed right part of the keypad. Visually, they seem pretty much like the Nokia N91’s cluster, however in the N96 the right soft-key brings up the Multimedia menu.





The numeric keys are average in size and sit under flat plastic slabs. Being glossy, they certainly attract grease and dirt from your hands, which is especially visible while indoors. We have no gripes with the N96’s keypad – it handles well, the buttons are generally good and have sufficient travel distance. They are all lit in white, which makes them visible in various environments.




Battery

The handset makes use of a 950 mAh Li-Ion battery (BL-5F), which is the same as what the original Nokia N95 had, whereas the N95 8Gb had its cell capacity kicked up to 1050 mAh. Given their identical screens, we have a feeling that the Nokia N96 could also use a more capable battery.




The N96 has a rated battery life of 3.6 hours talk time and up to 220 hours standby time. For Nokia N95, the standby time was rated at 240 hours. So, generally, in all main usage modes (voice, web surfing, etc) you won’t notice much of a difference between these too. On a side note, the Nokia N81, thanks to employing different hardware solutions as compared to the Nokia N95, allowed it to excel in terms of battery time in all primary modes, and score 420 hours on standby tests, which is as close to perfect as it only gets. It takes the N96 a little over 2 hours to charge from empty to full.

The Nokia N96 comes equipped with a DSP for sound and video processing; this way, their presence should boost the handset’s performance on these fronts. Let’s take a look at our battery time chart and see how well it fared in a duel with the Nokia N95 8Gb:
GPS-navigation – 3 hours
Video – 4.5 hours (rated at 5 hours, the Nokia N95 8Gb lasted 3.5 hours).
WEB surfing (over EDGE) – 3 hours (same 3 hours on the N95 8Gb).
Wi-Fi (non-stop data upload) – 3.5 hours (N95 8Gb – 3 hours).
Music (in headphones) – 13.5 hours (rated at 14 hours, the Nokia N95 8Gb – at 10 hours)
TV (only for the N96) – up to 5 hours.

Obviously, the N96’s hardware feats help it stay up in the video and music modes longer while packing a less capable battery. Other than that, it was on a par with the Nokia N95 8Gb (give or take in view of its inferior cell).

In Moscow, the N96 stayed online for around 2 days when we were heavy on its features (regular mail checks, up to 5 hours of music and up to 20 SMS messages). We are confident the phone will easily last 2 days even in the most extreme usage mode (except for non-stop web-browsing), and if you are planning to use nothing but its voice calls, then expect 3-4 days of operation, depending on how much time you spend on the phone.

Back to the table of contents >>>
Memory

The N96 is the first S60 smartphone to enjoy both 16 Gb of built-in storage and memory cards. Up until today Nokia hasn’t been running this memory structure on many devices, except for its Internet tablets, like the Nokia N800 or Nokia N810. It is definitely a great feat to have; but it is not only Nokia – Motorola is also exercising this approach (specifically with the ROKR E8, although this concept is marred there by measly inbuilt storage volume).

The handset sports a couple of sections inside its memory – one, Disk C (256 Mb of which around 180 Mb are available), is employed for storing user data, contracts, messages, calendar events etc; it is managed like on other smartphones, i.e. you can save any files here, install applications you need and son on. The same tricks can be done with the inbuilt storage, marked as an extra disk, or, as today’s smartphones have it, a memory card. The file manager now features another tab for memory cards; but at the end of the day it doesn’t really matter what memory section you work with, as you are free to jump between them back and forth, install any applications you want, save any data you need and so forth. So, in essence, it is all the same.

On the other hand, there is a tiny detail, that can come in handy – when copying files in the USB Mass Storage mode into the handset’s built-in memory, the speed will top out at around 2 Mb/s, however, when moving data from or to the memory card from the bundled storage, you will get only 1 Mb/s at best. And we are lost on why it’s so – probably, we’ll need to get back to this issue once we get our hands on a commercial unit.

The N96’s RAM volume makes 128 Mb, although after first start-up there will be only around 89 Mb left at your disposal. On this front it is no different from the Nokia N95 8Gb.

Back to the table of contents >>>
Hardware specifications

As you remember, the Nokia N95 runs the TI OMAP 2420, which is the same solution utilized for all top-of-the-line solutions. With the advent of the Nokia N81, they added another option – a platform from Freescale. And now along comes the third solution – the STN8816 (Nomadik line-up) from STMicroelectronics that employs the ARM926EJ CPU running at 334 MHz. Honestly, sometimes I catch myself thinking that this “334 MHz” mark is bewitched in some way, so that Nokia’s S60-powered solutions can get past it. The fact is, all today’s devices utilize this clock rate, and it’s not clear why, given how different the solutions they retain are and the possibility to kick the TI OMAP's rate up.

The N96 also packs in a DSP for video processing (decodes to H.264 at 30 FPS and VGA resolution – other formats are supported too, but this one is more prioritized). For its audio needs, the handset employs a 24-bit DSP and a wealth of effects that come preinstalled with it, although it is all up to the vendor to enable them or not.

As you can see from this short rundown on the platform, the N96 has some feats onboard that we would like to take for a test drive; specifically, its sound quality and how it fares compared to the competition.

The phone also comes packaged with a motion sensor that automatically rotates the screen when you flip the N96 in your hands.

Back to the table of contents >>>
USB, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi

USB. The handset comes in with USB 2.0 support, upon a successful PC connection you can choose one of the following modes:
Data Transfer (Mass Storage USB) – memory cards is available, no drivers required, as your OS identifies the handset automatically. Data transfer speed makes around 1800-2000 Kb/s (USB 2.0).
PC Suite – used for device management via Nokia PC Suite, enables all features of the phone, data backup etc.
Image Print – no explanation required.
Media Player (MTP protocol) – synchronizes data with Windows Media Player.

Bluetooth. The smartphone sports EDR-enabled Bluetooth 2.0 alongside the following profiles:
A2DP
AVCRP
BIP-ImagePush
DUN-GW
FT-Server
HandsFree-AG (1.0)
Headset-AG
OBEX
OPP-Client
OPP-Server
SIM Access-Server

The top speed you can get with the N96’s Bluetooth connection is around 100 Kb/s. We also tested its A2DP profile in pair with the Sony Ericsson DS970 headset, which worked just fine – we managed our play list, skipped within tracks and adjusted volume seamlessly, however we couldn’t make current track’s title show up on the N81’s display.

Wi-Fi. This handset comes armed with Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11 g) support. All security standards are supported: WEP , WPA , WPA 2, with other advanced settings available. The device supports Universal PnP standard (UPnP), which is the successor to the wired standard PnP. With its help, along with Wi-Fi, you can send slides to a TV, music to a stereo system, and photos to a printer. In a certain sense UPnP is like an add-on to the infrastructure (Wi-Fi, for example) in the form of Bluetooth-esque services, so this looks more like a software upgrade. The sales package includes Home Media Server, which allows connecting the N96 through your home Wi-Fi network to a desktop PC.

There is also a Wi-Fi wizard available in the N96 – it can keep looking for enabled networks in the background mode and tap into them.

Back to the table of contents >>>
Music department

What we were really thrilled about with the N96 was what the new chip could bring to the table – its 24-bit DSP had to make some difference, compared to the performance of Nokia’s other offerings. However, we didn’t notice any substantial improvements, although it seemed that bass pumped better, especially when we used custom earphones (the one that comes bundled with the N96 isn’t a good choice after all). The handset’s player packs no bells and whistles, being a standard FP2 fare – you can learn more about it and the system itself in our in-depth review.

And now it’s about time we gave the tribune to Alexander Dembovsky – wrapping it all up, we should also note that the N96’s inbuilt FM radio is pretty good, although it is little to no different from other solutions out there. In speakerphone mode the phone did well playing music and radio – actually over my quality time with the Nokia N96 I got hooked on its online radio, I would often tap into a local WiFi network, tune in to some station, pull the stand out and enjoy music or news bulletins. All thanks to such a tiny, measly detail as the desk stand, the N96 is so much more usable – in this sense I also like the way the Nokia N810 is designed.

Mobile television

The N96 comes installed with a no-frills application for watching TV programmes, featuring a list of broadcasts, enabling you to see short clips taken out of them (not full-screen, however). On the plus side, this app allows for programme descriptions, also it can kick in or start recording on schedule, although the latter ability won’t be available for the most part, since most of the content you watch is protected.





The TV quality offered by the N96 is relatively good, especially when you think that it is DVB-H; consequently you wont’ be able to make use of this functionality unless your region supports the DVB-H standard.

Back to the table of contents >>>
Impressions

The reception quality provided by the N96 is up to Nokia’s standard, nothing to worry about here. The vibro alert is moderate strength-wise. The N96’s two loudspeakers are pretty average as far as their volume is concerned, in fact on this front it is in line with the Nokia N81.

Basically, with the prototypes we got our hands on, it is impossible to judge the N96’s real build quality or UI speed and reliability, so we can either wait for new updates to hardware and software or just sit idle until we get a chance to play around with a commercial edition of the handset.

The N96 is set to arrive in August – September 2008 and will retail for around 550 Euro in Europe (whereas in Russia its price tag will float around the level of 1000 USD, especially during its first months on the market). This phone is heavy both on video and television, that’s why its feats won’t be particularly craved here, in Russia. And given that there are other offerings to come that will offer similar specs under their hoods (USB speed, memory structure), there is no point in paying a premium for the Nokia N96 and getting a bunch of pretty much useless abilities for good measure. On top of that, the N96 is rather a stand-alone device in Nokia’s range; it by no means aims to appeal to each and everyone as the top-of-the-line solution in spite of its index.

On a more interesting note – the Nokia N95 8Gb, upon its release, went for 570 Euro, which is in line with the Nokia N96’s reported price tag and even a tad above it. But there are no far-reaching conclusions to be made here, except for one thing – 16 Gb storage will become par for the course starting late 2008, as a couple of affordable (relatively, though) N81-esque models will come out sporting this much memory onboard.
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #431 on: April 04, 2008, 07:11:48 AM »
try the new Opera Mini 4.1 beta


Quote
Opera Mini 4.1 released in beta
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/04/02/opera-mini-41-released-in-beta.html


Opera Mini 4.1 is out! Still in beta, the new version "improves the way Opera Mini interacts with your phone to make browsing more convenient, more productive and definitely more fun."
Highlights/new features:
It's up to 50% faster than Opera Mini 4
URL autocomplete - Opera Mini will automatically suggest URL completions
Save pages for offline access
Find content in the page
Download and upload files - i.e. add attachments to email (if you're using Opera Mini to access your webmail)
Want to try it? Sure you do!
Follow this link for download instructions.
http://www.operamini.com/beta/
Alternatively, you may want to watch the Opera Mini 4.1 guided tour;
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/04/02/opera-mini-41-released-in-beta.html


Windows apps;

Quote
Spb Mobile Shell. Second edition
http://www.mobile-review.com/soft/2008/mobile-shell-en.shtml

I get to hear rants on how Windows Mobile based devices are fiddly to manage very often – indeed, the system’s default UI, even in its latest and greatest version, doesn’t quite qualify as user friendly. That’s why all more or less advanced and savvy users have turned their eyes to the field of third-party software, where one of the most newsworthy recent releases is Spb Software House’s Mobile Shell. While the first version of the application appealed to many, just like any other new product it had an array of glitches, which the developers have tried to address with the new version. So our job is pretty easy this time – try to figure out how well they have coped with this task.
Spb Mobile Shell
Developer – Spb Software House
Home page – www.spbsoftwarehouse.com
Price – 29.95$

Lately I’ve been stumbling upon a lot of topics on installing one application on a multitude of devices. The policy of Spb Software House in this matter seems to be the most reasonable – the registration key they issue once you purchase the product is not locked on your device ID or hardwired to it in any way, so you can still use the same Mobile Shell license even when you get a new WM device; on top of that updates to the current build are free, while the new version is available with a 50% rebate to all registered users. But that’s not all: if you upgrade to the new version in less than 90 days since the purchase of the previous application’s release, it is absolutely free. By the way, another approach to the problem of upgrading your software is exercised by Apple with its firmware updates for the iPod Touch (which are not free), and developers whose applications are locked on your device’s hardware identifier or something alone these lines. Sometimes transferring programs of the latter type can be done after getting in touch with the developer’s support service, but these cases are rather exceptions from the rule.







Now, cutting straight to the chase, the new version of Mobile Shell has undergone a major revamp for its Now screen. Basically, not only does it allow checking the status, it is used for managing the device. The Now screen is divided in a couple of active zones – lining the top of the screen is the weather forecast thumbnail, mail box status, call log and quick profiles (professional mode). The second zone features the clock (analog or digital), rounding out the interface is the part with current calendar events, notifications of upcoming meetings and affairs.

But the foremost improvement coming in the updated Now screen is the icon bar at the foot of the display that allows for one-touch access to the application list and settings (second button) and speed dial panel




Tapping the second thumbnail brings up the list of most recent applications you used - while you can put them off the screen, you won’t be able to remove the display brightness icon which is hardwired into this menu. The application list displayed on this screen is carried over from the plugin for the Today screen, so in a nutshell the developers have included an application manager of some sort into their Now interface that allows launching applications without having to dig deep into other menus.








Below are six huge thumbnails leading to certain applications grouped up by type – they will take you to corresponding program pools available in your WM device with a welcome touch of animation along the way.

It is worth noting that all buttons and icon are tweaked for finger-based navigation, being just big enough, plus the screen driver has been optimized to read larger areas you tap with your finger.






The speed dial panel enables the user to put up to 15 entries from the contact list on it, each marked by a sizable thumbnail. The icon in the bottom right corner calls up the on-screen keyboard for quick Smart Dial powered search – you tap in first letters of a contact’s name, while the application displays all matches and offers you a number of options (i.e. make a call, send a message etc).




Apart from refurbishing the Now screen the developers have tacked on an eye-candy way to bring the tabs from the Now screen to the display – while dealing with some application, just tap the status bar that runs along the top of the screen and then move the stylus (or finger for devices that don’t have their displays recessed into the casing) down. Now, moving the stylus right or left you can pick the panel you need without closing the application you are currently in.
Impressions

Spb Software House has been putting in a lot of hours rectifying the interface-related glitches of Windows Mobile – first, with its original Mobile Shell release, and now with the second version of this application. No doubt, when we installed this shell on our communicator, it is a huge relief, partly thanks to the fact that we didn’t have to take the stylus in hands too often, if ever; and when we had no other option, it was only in applications that weren’t optimized for finger-based navigation. On the plus side, this utility doesn’t require your mobile device to be a powerhouse and has almost no effect on the performance of fairly old or slow systems. We’d like to hope that he developers will not stop at this point and will continue pushing the capabilities of this undoubtedly useful tool even further, as, honestly, there are still some functions that we would like to have in there. For example, they could enhance the Now screen with a special tab for quick application launch (styled after the speed dial panel) – those 11 thumbnails you get with the application menu aren’t always enough. We would also welcome the ability to view currently running applications from the status bar at the top, which would make them even easier to navigate.

New methods of navigation, specifically gesture-based controls, allow making communicators so much easier to move about. I do hope this tendency to leave styluses out of work will reach not only software developers, but also the creators of the operating system itself. But for now, Spb Mobile Shell is a must-have application – it is that case when the products price is fully justified by what it packs under the hood.


^^^ Must-have windows application ^^^
« Last Edit: April 20, 2008, 04:28:13 PM by tusken RAIDEr - CEO of The Dangerous Crew Movement »
 

Monotone

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #432 on: April 11, 2008, 08:38:45 AM »
anybody seen that program winmobile torrent?

torrenting on windows mobile phones, sounds crazy. Anybody tried it yet?
 

JAZ

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #433 on: April 11, 2008, 08:43:45 AM »
i can get a new phone the 24th. im still rolling with the SE k700i now. because i hardly ever keep below my bundle, i can get mad discount. i want a phone with good internet browsing, lots of gigabytes, and a decent camera. what do you guys suggest?
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #434 on: April 11, 2008, 05:19:22 PM »
i can get a new phone the 24th.
im still rolling with the SE k700i now.

because i hardly ever keep below my bundle, i can get mad discount.
i want a phone with good internet browsing,lots of gigabytes,and a decent camera.
what do you guys suggest?

Well,it sounds like you´re looking for a "multi-media phone" there´s so many to choose from.  :P ;)

Nokia N95 8GB 8GB build memory,5MPX camera,GPS


Nokia N82
5MPX camera,GPS.
"only" 160MB build in memory,but 8GB cards is available for around 60-70 $. (16GB cards is right around the corner)


SonyEricsson G900 same specs as Nokia N82


HTC Touch Cruise 128MB build in memory,but just get a memory card. Windows Mobile,GPS,3MPX camera

 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #435 on: April 20, 2008, 04:34:35 PM »
News;


Quote
New Motorola handsets, courtesy of their leaked roadmap
http://www.mobile-review.com/fullnews/main/index_eng.shtml

Below are pictures, and brief technical specifications of some new Motorola handsets – some you may already know about, and some you may not.
Nothing shown below is amazing, in terms of technical specifications, but, at least, for now, Motorola isn't re-using the once-popular Razr-line of handsets.



Motorola A810
2.2-inch touchscreen, with full handwriting recognition
Linux OS
Dimensions: 104.85 x 50.8 x 13.5mm
Weight: 100 grams
Motorola VE75:
Slider form-factor
Support for Dual sim cards 2.6 inch screen, 16:9 ratio, 240x400 pixels (WQVGA).
2 megapixel camera
Dimensions: 110 x 50 x 18.9mm
Weight: 120 grams
Motorola A1600 Ming:
3 megapixel camera
GPS Wi-Fi
2.4 inch screen
Dimensions: 98.5 x 53.4 x 19.50mm
Weight: 120 grams
Motorola ZN5 "Texel":
5 megapixel camera
Morphing keypad, ala the E8
Linux OS
500MHZ Freescale processor
2.4 inch QVGA screen
Bluetooth
TV-out functionality


Quote
Laser-based head mounted display patented by Apple
http://www.mobile-review.com/fullnews/main/index_eng.shtml


The iPhone, and, to some extent, the iPod, are pretty decent video players. But, of course, there is one limitation – screen size.
This may be about to change for iPod and iPhone users, if Apple's patent has anything to say about it.
Sure, head mounted displays is nothing out of the ordinary, but, going by Apple's patent, it's not actually all that bulky.
Most of the devices size can be attributed to the light source, and the components that are necessary to generate, as well as display video imagery.
Apple like to shove a lot of technology into small packages, and there is no exception here.
Apple reckon that all of the necessary components should be put into a small, battery-operated box, which can then be clipped on to the users belt.
Then, video is transmitted to the headset, via a laser, and an optical cable.
Wedge optics will then display the video in front of the users eyes.



 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #436 on: May 01, 2008, 05:04:27 AM »
News

well,it´s been a little quiet lately.
Some new HTC and SE phones is dropping in a minute that´s rumored to be amazing. But let´s see  ;)

Quote
iSwish - yet another iPhone-like UI for Windows Mobile smartphones
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/04/30/iswish-yet-another-iphone-like-ui-for-windows-mobile-smartphones.html
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/A77VD9nKGDw&amp;hl=en&amp;autoplay=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/A77VD9nKGDw&amp;hl=en&amp;autoplay=0</a>

If an open-platform packed with power and backed by a huge developer community is your thing, then you're probably rocking a Windows Mobile device. Sure, there are complaints of stability and what-not, but chances are that your solid Windows Mobile device has started to stumble every now and again due to the same third-party applications that make the platform so appealing in the first place.

So, how are you going to scratch that itch for a fun and innovative interface like that on the iPhone? Why, put the iPhone UI on your Windows Mobile device, of course. The latest method to put the iPhone's multi-touch UI is Flick Software Research's "iSwish" and "iZoom." Flick Software Research is set to launch its iSwish UI and iZoom applications in beta-form in early May.

It's a complete rip of Apple's iPhone UI, but hey, if you can't beat 'em, copy 'em.
 

G.O.D. Pt. III

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #437 on: May 01, 2008, 06:47:14 AM »
ayo chad do you know any links for some 240x320 java games and opera browser (not opera mini but the full browser)
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA</a>
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #438 on: May 01, 2008, 03:52:16 PM »
opera browser (not opera mini but the full browser)

Yes,here you go;
Opera for Windows Mobile

http://www.opera.com/products/mobile/products/

ayo chad do you know any links for some 240x320 java games

Have you checked this site?;
Gameloft The #1 Mobile Games Publisher!
http://www.gameloft.com/

 

G.O.D. Pt. III

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #439 on: May 01, 2008, 11:42:06 PM »
i meant some pirate shit on the low  8)
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA</a>
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #440 on: May 02, 2008, 04:21:26 AM »
i meant some pirate shit on the low  8)

oki,then no.
But maybe you should try to sign up to any of these forums;

windowsforum.org

http://forums.windowsforum.org/index.php?s=2d719ad1559befca95f55f113d74c145&act=home

The cats who runs this site knows their shit;
http://www.mobile-review.com/index-en.shtml

I subscribe to this forums RSS feeds;
www.esato.com


^^^^ never signed up to any of them myself,but know they got "secret" sections.  ;) ^^^
I´m pretty sure you can find what you´re looking for in one of those forums.  ;)
Jack the (hook up) links and post them here  ;) ;) ;) :P :P :laugh: :laugh:

 

G.O.D. Pt. III

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #441 on: May 06, 2008, 12:15:36 PM »
all my smartphone players:

i got the hookup on some applications that normally would cost but bundy lurked last night and found a bunch of shit. if you need opera mobile 8.65 cracked, coreplayer, pocketplayer (amazing fucking program) or anything else cracked holla at me thru PM and i'll slide you some links  8)
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA</a>
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #442 on: May 06, 2008, 02:24:32 PM »
im still waitin on that sony x1...thats gotta be THE phone to get when it drops...

G.O.D. Pt. III

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #443 on: May 07, 2008, 03:43:54 AM »
All my Windows Mobile 5/6 players hit me up on PM for programs that you NEED to have for your PDA

and raider: skyfire 0.6 beta just released to people on their mailing list. I recieved a text with the program earlier yesterday and installed it. check it out  8)
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA</a>
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #444 on: May 07, 2008, 10:05:53 PM »
All my Windows Mobile 5/6 players hit me up on PM for programs that you NEED to have for your PDA

and raider: skyfire 0.6 beta just released to people on their mailing list. I recieved a text with the program earlier yesterday and installed it. check it out  8)

remember that I´m useing a Symbian powered device at the moment  ;)
what´s skyfire?  :P what did I miss?  :P ;)
 

DJJohnB

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #445 on: May 09, 2008, 03:54:58 AM »
overrated fone
 

G.O.D. Pt. III

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #446 on: May 10, 2008, 04:09:54 AM »
All my Windows Mobile 5/6 players hit me up on PM for programs that you NEED to have for your PDA

and raider: skyfire 0.6 beta just released to people on their mailing list. I recieved a text with the program earlier yesterday and installed it. check it out  8)

remember that I´m useing a Symbian powered device at the moment  ;)
what´s skyfire?  :P what did I miss?  :P ;)

new mobile browser that looks to be the best one available. my favorite is still opera mini 4 and i've used every browser i've come across.

http://www.skyfire.com/
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA</a>
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #447 on: May 10, 2008, 08:56:34 PM »
All my Windows Mobile 5/6 players hit me up on PM for programs that you NEED to have for your PDA

and raider: skyfire 0.6 beta just released to people on their mailing list. I recieved a text with the program earlier yesterday and installed it. check it out  8)

remember that I´m useing a Symbian powered device at the moment  ;)
what´s skyfire?  :P what did I miss?  :P ;)

new mobile browser that looks to be the best one available. my favorite is still opera mini 4 and i've used every browser i've come across.

http://www.skyfire.com/

it looks dope,but do I really need to sign up to download it?  :P :-\ ;)
 

G.O.D. Pt. III

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #448 on: May 11, 2008, 12:05:02 AM »
yeah you gotta sign up for the beta and they will send you a download link over text
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tgcK_ctvaZI</a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-CZe5SrVHaA</a>
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #449 on: May 12, 2008, 05:46:58 PM »
yeah you gotta sign up for the beta and they will send you a download link over text

Quote
You will need:
Mobile phone running Windows Mobile 5 or 6

^^^^ My current phone (N82) is running Symbian S60 3.1  ;) ^^^
So  :-\ :-\ :P :P :P ;) ;) ;) ;)

Nokia N82 with a 8GB memory card  ;)



So did you get Opera (not mini) for your phone yet?