Author Topic: How Historic is this Election  (Read 72 times)

M Dogg™

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How Historic is this Election
« on: June 08, 2008, 11:08:37 AM »
We talk about how historic this election is, but at the end of the day, just how historic is it. Through out American history we have had some great elections and in what is called a change year we have had some change years that make this year look mild. A look at some of the most historic elections in US History, and were does this one rank.

1789 -
winner: George Washington (no political party), loser: none

Well aside from being the only presidental candidate that had no major opposition, Washington also made history by being the first president ever. John Adams, one of the runner ups was selected as the VP. A reminder, the president was not selected at all by the people by by the country elite who represented their state and thus Washington won the first round of voting 69 to 0, and then John Adams won the second round to be VP with 34 votes. Side not, New York, North Carolina and Rhode Island did not send their electorical college voters. At the end of his presidency, Washington warned of the dangers of the 2 party system.


1828 -
winner: Andrew Jackson (Democrat), loser: John Quincy Adams (National Republican)

Since 1820, the Democratic-Republican party has ran with no Federalist opposition. In 1824 the battle between John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson tore the Democratic-Republican party in to huge factions. Now in the elections they go at one on one as last time Jackson received the greater number of votes, but not the majority due to other people running. This allowed for a deadlock, which was handed to congress and then the presidency was handed to John Q. Adams. In their rematch, John Q. Adams ran for re-election as a National Republican (which would become the Whigs) and Andrew Jackson ran as a Democrat, and with support on his side and thanks to Thomas Jefferson's writing, Andrew Jackson won the election in a blow out and opened up the next era of campaigning, which instead of campaigning to the elite Jackson campaigned to the people and won their support. At the end of his presidency Jackson desolved the National Bank once he could do it.


1860 -
winner: Abraham Lincoln (Republican), John C. Breckinridge (Southern Democratic), Stephen A. Douglas (Northern Democrat),

In 1856, we saw the last of the Whigs and also in 1856 we saw a new Republican party form, which main issue was slavery. But it wasn't until 1860 did the Republican party truly take in the former Whigs and the split of the Democrat party led to one of the most unlikely stories. A Illinois state senator would go on to win the Republican nomination as he was one of it's main shapers, but then go on to defeat a divided Democrat party and become the president of the United States. In an era charges on slavery and the states rights issues, Lincoln's election caused many southern states to leave the Union right away and making this, in my opinion, the most important election in United State's history. The stakes was electing a president that could handle the pressure of a divided country, maybe a civil war and settling once and for all the slave issue.

1896 -
William McKinley (Republican), William Jennings Bryan (Democrat)

Hello liberalism. The candidate was popular, his party was going in a opposite direction that it's pro-capitalism stance, but William McKinley was moving forward anyways. Though the true effect might be that the Democrat party truly inbraced modern liberalism, and that McKinley's running mate in 1900, Teddy Roosevelt is someone that now Ron Paul Republicans hate.

1932 -
Franklin Roosevelt (Democrat), Herbert Hoover (Republican)

Progressive politics have fully arrived. After Woodrow Wilson, the nation went back to it's traditional conservative politics, and when Hoover refused to do anything about the economy during the Great Depression, then the nation looked at FDR. Electing a president that promised a New Deal, the United States embarked in a system they had never truly seen, borderline socialism. The depths of the Depression left the United States looking for answers, and well Roosevelt gave very little when actually running for president, the fact that someone was offering something different drove the population into the arms of the Democrat party. The results, a president that sat for 12 years, and lead us through the Depression and a World War.

1968 -
Richard Nixon (Republican), Hubert Humphrey (Democrat), George Wallace (American Independent)

Oh man, revolution was about to start. With a unpopular war, and the south mad at the Democrats for passing civil rights, things became clear that this would be an election unlike no other. Since the time of Lincoln, the south had voted for the Democrat party like it was voting for Jesus Christ as president, but when fellow southern Lyndon Johnson passed the civil rights bill the south had an uprise. Complete with youth protest of the Democrat party in Chicago, the Democrat party came crashing down as they lost their base of the youth vote and the southern vote. The youth vote would comeback, but it's the southern vote that has lead the Republican party to victory in 7 out of the last 10 elections, and the only Democrats to win have both been from the south.
 

Corporate Hustler

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Re: How Historic is this Election
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2008, 09:30:19 AM »
someone is proud of himself for paying attention in 8th grade
 

M Dogg™

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Re: How Historic is this Election
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2008, 10:25:42 AM »
someone is proud of himself for paying attention in 8th grade

actually 5th  ;D
 

Primo

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Re: How Historic is this Election
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2008, 05:43:48 PM »
Barack Obama is more white and arab than black.
 

Teddy Roosevelt

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Re: How Historic is this Election
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2008, 05:47:44 PM »
So... How important is this election?
 

Sparegeez

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Re: How Historic is this Election
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2008, 05:53:11 PM »
Where's the source? I know you didn't write this. It's interesting though.
 

M Dogg™

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Re: How Historic is this Election
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2008, 09:59:00 PM »
Where's the source? I know you didn't write this. It's interesting though.

actually i did. I was a history major in college. I watch a lot of history channel... lol... and I always had an interest in the presidency so I decided to put this up there to kind of measure this year. It's getting called a historic election so I decided to post up the ones that were truly historic elections.

So... How important is this election?

If I had to rank them, I'd say:

1. 1860
2. 1798
3. 1932
4. 1968
5. 2008
6. 1828
7. 1896 (the election all Ron Paul Republicans should curse... lol)