Author Topic: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread  (Read 14915 times)

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #175 on: May 02, 2009, 03:52:11 AM »
damn i really hope some the great stuff they have in tha vaults.

where can i get the full document:

 

DTG Entertainment

  • Guest
Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #176 on: May 02, 2009, 05:37:55 AM »
there is 7 parts to that youtube link and on part 6 the audio is disabled and has a note: This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled

lol

There was audio on it at one point. I watched it. Nothing new in regards to music.

strange,I'm sure we will get hold of a copy (with audio) in time.
 

2euce 7even

  • Guest
Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #177 on: May 03, 2009, 03:06:11 AM »


where can i get the full document:


 

Mietek23

Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #178 on: May 06, 2009, 05:04:59 AM »
Words From The Lord: Lord G Speaks On Militia All-Stars, Death Row & Going Solo
written by Frank Meyer on Monday, June 12, 2006

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

Rapper Lord G is a soldier. He fought in the Militia, led the Universal Brigade, and survived the war at Death Row.

The Detroit-born MC has much clout in the rap game, having fronted hit-makers Militia and a slew of other groups, having been under the tutelage of rap maestro Dr. Dre, and having appeared on albums that have sold nearly three million copies collectively. An expert lyricist, beat maker and freestyle king, Lord G has won many rap battles, but he’s about to win the war.

After moving to Los Angeles, Lord G found himself at Suge Knight’s legendary Death Row label, where under the guidance of Dr. Dre he crafted beats, ghost-wrote lyrics and appeared on the classic Above The Rim soundtrack with the hot bonus cut “My Money Right.” With his deep, gravely cadence, lyrics filled with one-two punch lines, and a vocal style that falls somewhere between Busta Rhymes and Method Man over a West Coast flow and Motor City attitude, G was one of the soon-to-be rising stars at the label. He was slated to record his debut album for tha Row, but exited just before the gun-play and drama set in.

Lord G Militia

Never one to lay low, G issued a slew of independent singles and the out-of-the-trunk album Phobia by his posse Faces of Fear (F.O.F.), which created a buzz and brought him to the attention of burgeoning label Red Ant (Salt 'N' Pepa, Wu Tang Clan’s Sunz of Man, Whoridas), who quickly signed him to a deal. While at Red Ant, G met the other rap newcomers to the label, duos Diz and Deviuz, and Ms. Toi and Mr. Tan. The five rappers got along so well they decided to form a super-group, and Militia was born. Militia’s self-titled debut album spawned the smash single “Burn,” three big-budget videos and sold over 300,000 copies. However, when the label went bankrupt the group went M.I.A.

Lord G quickly hit the studio to capitalize on the heat from “Burn” and churned out the indie album Hot Ta Def on Da Mic Chord, which was executive produced by Dr. Dre’s protégé Chris “The Glove” Taylor. Always on the hunt for new artists to groom and collaborate with, he laced the streets with a mixtape (U.B. In Ya Area) by his group Universal Brigade and a single under the name Strange Museum. Recently, Lord G recorded tracks for Supersuckers frontman Eddie Spaghetti’s upcoming remix album New No. 2 and reunited with Militia’s Mr. Tan, Ms. Toi and Diz for a reunion album titled Comin’ Atcha. G4 recently caught him on the set of the “Work Dat Thang” video and we chatted about the past, present and future of this hot ta def MC.

You’re from Detroit; tell me about how you got from Detroit to LA.

Well, you know, a series of events took place. I hooked up with my boy Billy Hearns, through one of his brothers, named Jay Mark. He got involved in listening to my music and saw there was a high level of seriousness in the music. He asked me what I thought was necessary to make it, and I told him I either had to go to California or New York, where it was really cracking. My cousin was out here and was already working for a record company that had Eric B and Rakim at the time, which is definitely one of my top groups. I came out here to California to link up with my cousin, Vince Berry and the rest is straight history.

So how did you hook up with Dr. Dre?

When I got out here, I started going to different studios and performing in different clubs, trying to promote myself on the street level. Then a friend of mine named Tony Green became the bass player for Dr. Dre and his Camp. He was up there telling them he knew the baddest rapper on the mic, “My boy from Detroit, Lord G.” So one day he took me down there with him and I met the Death Row Camp.

Lord G MilitiaWhat was your role when you were over there?

Well, when I was over there I was under artist development. I was gonna be Death Row’s first positive artist, which I thought would have been real good as they didn’t have nobody over there with that conscience rap. They had a lot of gangsta rap, underground stuff, but I was doing positive, conscience rap. I ended up vocal coaching Bow Wow when he was very young, and I even got to write some tracks a Dr. Dre group called Warning. It was three girls. Not only did I produce the music on a song, but I got to write the lyrics. That was one of the first times that I ever wrote an R&B song in its entirety. And it went really good, but the group had some internal conflicts and never ended up coming out. But I was honored that Dre allowed me to work on them, you know?

And then you did that song “My Money Right” on the Above the Rim soundtrack. How did that come about?

I hooked up with Butch Smalls, who was a friend of Tony Green. A producer named Maestro sent that track down to me in the mail. Das from Dog Pound really liked it and encouraged Suge Knight to listen to it in front of me one day. It was the third time that he had tried to tell Suge about it and this particular day Suge listened to it and said, “You know what? Put him on there.” And I became the first artist to work with Death Row that wasn’t signed to them.

How did you get out of Death Row? ‘Cause all that bad stuff with Tupac and Dre was about to go down, right?

Death Row was going through a lot of internal stuff and I wanted to get my record out. At that particular time they had a board of operations where you had to wait in a line, which made sense that they would put out the people that were waiting before me, but I didn’t want to wait too long. Unfortunately they weren’t able to give me a release date timeframe. So it was a conflict of interest right there because I was really interested in the release timeframe. It didn’t have to be exact. If you told me between June and December, that would have been good enough for me, but they weren’t able to do that, so that ended up making me go a different direction. But it ended on a good note. There was no negative energy there whatsoever. I mean, even to this day when a friend of mine saw Suge and he asked him, “What’s up with Lord G? Is he doing all right? I want him to get at me.” I tried to talk to him about doing some production, but they want to sign me as an artist and right now I got some other stuff on the table, so I wasn’t able to do that. It just went a different way, you know?

Lord G MilitiaHow did you get involved with Militia?

I had a solo deal with a company called Red Ant Records and Milita was signed to Red Ant, where Mr. Tan and Ms. Toi were signed as the Phat Pack. One day the label rented out a studio and set up a meeting where we all came down there together. They wanted to see how the chemistry was and had a nice beat up and running. We all started flowing and the chemistry was just real natural. It’s almost as if it was meant to be, so we ended up making a couple of songs then. They came out so hot, that they said they wanted to put us in a studio for a week and see what we could do. We finished up that whole album and became involved in it.

We shot a video for  the remix of “Burn,” with the five of us, because the first version only had the two previous members, Diz and Deviuz. We ended up doing a second video for “Who’s The Next MC To Crumble,” but unfortunately the record company went out of business right as our plant was beginning to sprout out of the ground. It was unfortunate, but it was a learning experience and definitely a blessing because we got to go on tour and got to see different parts of the world.

You guys toured with Wu Tang’s Sunz of Man, who were also on the label, right?

Yup. We shared a van. The company van was wrapped half Militia on one side, Sunz of Man on the other side, so depending on which side you passed by you’d see a Sunz of Man ad or a Militia ad. We would ride around and do shows together. We spent a lot of time together.

Then you did the Hot Ta Def solo album with Chris “The Glove” Taylor. How’d you meet him?

Chris “The Glove” Taylor was a protégé of Dr. Dre, so I was around him from that angle. Plus, some of my other partners spoke highly of Glove and his production. And at that time, The Firm’s “Phone Tap” was a really hot song, and with Chris helped produce that with Dr. Dre. He knew that I was working with Death Row, and we both had Dr. Dre in common. So it was a smooth transition. He asked me if I was interested and to listen to some tracks, see if he could get stuff on my album. Me listening to some of his tracks turned into him doing half of my album.

Lord G MilitiaYou were going for a different kind of sound on that record. It doesn’t sound like Militia or your later solo work. What was your point of view on that record?

We were getting tired of the monotonousness of the radio playing the same songs all day. There’s so much good music out there we’re not going to hear because of the way politics are involved in the music game, so we wanted to make something new and fresh with a new sound, you know? Something that will be fun to listen to, at the same time, be competitive. I kinda tried to become like the Prince of rap, like the artist Prince. He’s so different with his music and style. He’s so creative, and he’s fun to listen to. He’s a very good entertainer. I was kinda trying to mimic him on a rap level. Having something new, fresh, and different, man.

So when can we expect that long awaited Lord G sophomore album?

I’m in the process of working on some stuff right now, it’s coming along real good, and hopefully everything will be finished in the next couple of months. We wanted to go for a summer release, but we don’t want to come out in the last quarter so it’ll probably be the beginning of 2007. We’ll probably do an independent release and try to generate 40- 50,000 units. Then the majors will come to us and we can have more leverage when we’re negotiating with them. ‘Cause when you move about 40,000 units that’s when you’re under the microscope. They’ll come holler at you. ‘Cause 30,000 is $300,000 on the $10 retail value. That’s good money.

Damn right! You got a new video for “Work Dat Thang” as well. Tell me about that.

I didn’t even know how it was gonna happen and what was gonna happen, but one day I just had this idea of filming a video to one of my songs, just making a video as a way for a record company to make it and that way for a budget, but trying to do it on my own. So I learned a lotta stuff by doing that. I felt no artist has ever tried to get a deal with his album done and have his own video. I just thought that was a very unique approach that could draw a lot of attention and respect. You know, as far as showing a determined artist, and how you don’t wait for nothing too! You keep going, you keep on pushing towards the direction you want to go, keep pushing towards the destination: Never give up. Keep going no matter what happens. If you get ten dollars, make the ten dollars work in your favor. If you got $100, make it work in your favor. Every day I try to do something towards my goal and that video is like the cherry on top of the banana split for me because once I finished it, getting it edited and everything and seeing it, it was just such an accomplishment. And when record companies see that, they know they have an artist who’s not waiting for us to do anything for him. You put them in a position where they wanna be a part of what you’re doing, because you’re so active. People like to see people doing something they believe in what they do. It’s magnetic. I take my hat off to anybody that’s putting their own money into themselves. It only makes sense that you would invest in yourself.

Lord G MilitiaHow did the Militia All-Stars record come about?

You know the Militia All-Stars’ Comin’ Atcha is the second Militia album. The group transformed from five members to four on that album. The member Deviuz is not involved with this particular project, but it’s still all good with him and we still gotta lotta love for him. Even back in the day, every member of the group was working on their solo stuff and everybody did a lot of different things. We never stopped working. Toi went on tour with Ice Cube, Tan went on tour with Tyrese and Tash from Tha Alkaholiks, I was working on my Hot Ta Def album, so we were all doing stuff after that first Militia album, ‘cause we’re all from different places geography-wise. Tan is from New York, Toi is from Chicago, I’m from Detroit, Diz is from California, so a lot of the time we’re not in the same state. At this particular time, we were all back in the same state again, so we hooked up and started going through beats and different producers. We had about 16, 17 songs and they were really nice. We’re going to be able to touch the world on a level that we should, because it’s a big world, man. We live in a huge world where there’s a lotta people that you can touch if your music is properly promoted and marketed. You can touch people in Yugoslavia and Australia and places like that, you know? It’s much bigger then the USA.

So what does the future hold for Militia All-Stars? Think we’ll get another record or any more dates together? It was kinda cool seeing you and Tan on stage the other night opening for Tash and Kool Keith.

I think what’s gonna happen with Militia is that Comin’ Atcha is gonna get picked up by a major and they’re gonna re-release and repackage it, maybe with a couple of extra bonus tracks and a DVD with behind-the-scenes feature or something to give incentive to a lot of fans. We do have a nice fan base that can be built upon because “Burn” is officially gold now. But it doesn’t matter when you’re not out there in their face. But when you check Soundscan and says your record still sells a thousand copies a year, that’s a good thing. We have officially crossed the five hundred mark.

That’s crazy.

It’s gonna be big. Maybe a Militia collection. You put out the first album, the second album, AND the songs we recorded for a new album, and they can buy the trilogy. Something slick like that.

What advice would you give an up-and-coming rapper in 2006?

Well, in 2006 is a totally different world and it’s changing every day. Technology has completely changed the game, the politics are much more involved, and there’s a lotta payola involved. It’s a tough job for a talented kid to come out now and it really has nothing to do with talent anymore. It’s more about connections now, but back when I first started doing this, talent was the main ingredient. If you had talent, you could do a lot of things, and get through a lot of doors. Now those doors don’t open for talent.  They open for a lot of different reasons and it’s unfair to a person that’s determined to have a quality sound and be a quality artist. But what I would tell an up-and-coming artist is, do not be fooled by whatever the radio plays and whatever you see a person doing. Don’t think you have to change what you’re doing to get through that same filter. You still gotta believe in what you’re believing in. There has to be a level of determination that’s not to be surpassed, cause if you’re easily redirected, so to speak, you won’t have a direction. You have to be confident in your direction and push towards it and don’t be discouraged by what nobody says. You gotta believe in yourself and always refer to Prince if you need somebody to refer to, because Prince was told that the thing he was doing was musically incorrect. And he’s an icon in the music industry now. He’s very well respected, and the people that told him that are as sick as a dog right now.

That’s a good example because Prince is someone who was on a major label, he was on an independent, and he went back to majors. He’s done a lot of different things.

Exactly. He’s been on both sides of the fence. And very smart. He’s very intelligent. And you know, it’s always good to try to put a lot into yourself, too, because you’re only going to get out of something what you put into it, so if you don’t put that much in, don’t expect a lot to come out of it.

Word up.
 

Chad Vader

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #179 on: May 06, 2009, 07:19:10 AM »
well if Dre's track does exist in that documentary:
Birth of a Nation, I found a link to youtube:
The award winning low budget documentary "Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992" about the LA riot that occurred after the Rodney King trial.
Directed by Matthew McDaniel

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 1 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/p4mdI_h65vI&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/p4mdI_h65vI&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 2 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2ursY6IacNM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2ursY6IacNM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 3 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RXfYvjQuwT0&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RXfYvjQuwT0&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 4 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xbEbBHAmUfs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xbEbBHAmUfs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 5 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8LzS1M2S4Uw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8LzS1M2S4Uw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 6 of 7) NOTICE; This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UIEHq20JfjA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UIEHq20JfjA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 7 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KS1s1rzLqvQ&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KS1s1rzLqvQ&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>


there is 7 parts to that youtube link and on part 6 the audio is disabled and has a note: This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled

lol

There was audio on it at one point. I watched it.
Nothing new in regards to music.



 :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\ :-[



Anyway who started the rumor about "Mr.Officer" appearing in that documentary?

« Last Edit: May 06, 2009, 07:21:02 AM by Chad Vader »
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #180 on: May 06, 2009, 07:23:48 AM »
even if it is, prob. only for couple seconds...
 

Mietek23

Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #181 on: May 06, 2009, 07:28:39 AM »
well if Dre's track does exist in that documentary:
Birth of a Nation, I found a link to youtube:
The award winning low budget documentary "Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992" about the LA riot that occurred after the Rodney King trial.
Directed by Matthew McDaniel

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 1 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/p4mdI_h65vI&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/p4mdI_h65vI&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 2 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2ursY6IacNM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2ursY6IacNM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 3 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RXfYvjQuwT0&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RXfYvjQuwT0&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 4 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xbEbBHAmUfs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xbEbBHAmUfs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 5 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8LzS1M2S4Uw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8LzS1M2S4Uw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 6 of 7) NOTICE; This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UIEHq20JfjA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UIEHq20JfjA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 7 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KS1s1rzLqvQ&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KS1s1rzLqvQ&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>


there is 7 parts to that youtube link and on part 6 the audio is disabled and has a note: This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled

lol

There was audio on it at one point. I watched it.
Nothing new in regards to music.



 :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\ :-[



Anyway who started the rumor about "Mr.Officer" appearing in that documentary?



I think it was Annonymous One - the same dude that also said some time ago that his brother owns a vinyl-rip of some Chronic II tracks or some shit like that..
 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #182 on: May 06, 2009, 07:47:53 AM »
well if Dre's track does exist in that documentary:
Birth of a Nation, I found a link to youtube:
The award winning low budget documentary "Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992" about the LA riot that occurred after the Rodney King trial.
Directed by Matthew McDaniel

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 1 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/p4mdI_h65vI&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/p4mdI_h65vI&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 2 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2ursY6IacNM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2ursY6IacNM&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 3 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/RXfYvjQuwT0&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/RXfYvjQuwT0&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 4 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xbEbBHAmUfs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xbEbBHAmUfs&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 5 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/8LzS1M2S4Uw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/8LzS1M2S4Uw&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 6 of 7) NOTICE; This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/UIEHq20JfjA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/UIEHq20JfjA&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>

Birth Of A Nation 4*29*1992 (Part 7 of 7)
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/KS1s1rzLqvQ&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/KS1s1rzLqvQ&amp;hl=en&amp;fs=1</a>


there is 7 parts to that youtube link and on part 6 the audio is disabled and has a note: This video contains an audio track that has not been authorized by WMG. The audio has been disabled

lol

There was audio on it at one point. I watched it.
Nothing new in regards to music.



 :-\ :-\ :-\ :-\ :-[



Anyway who started the rumor about "Mr.Officer" appearing in that documentary?



I think it was Annonymous One - the same dude that also said some time ago that his brother owns a vinyl-rip of some Chronic II tracks or some shit like that..


read some old posts a while ago from both Quo and Mellowman about it.... but not sure if they're the OG source.
But people claiming shit for whatever reason is pathetic  :-X :P :laugh:
 

Mygla

Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #183 on: May 06, 2009, 07:50:55 AM »
I'm pretty sure it was mentioned in Ronin Ro's book... Seem to remember that Dre let McDaniel use it in his documentary as "payment" for the riot sound samples in The Day The Niggaz Took Over...
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #184 on: May 06, 2009, 12:46:39 PM »
I'm pretty sure it was mentioned in Ronin Ro's book...
Seem to remember that Dre let McDaniel use it in his documentary as "payment" for the riot sound samples in The Day The Niggaz Took Over...


"The Day The Niggaz Took Over" is used in the documentary  ;) Not "Mr.Officer"  :-\


 :-\
 

Dre-Day

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #185 on: May 07, 2009, 01:04:41 AM »
I'm pretty sure it was mentioned in Ronin Ro's book... Seem to remember that Dre let McDaniel use it in his documentary as "payment" for the riot sound samples in The Day The Niggaz Took Over...
nope.

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #186 on: May 20, 2009, 02:48:39 AM »
Chocolate Bandit
Real Name: William A. Green
Aliases: Junior Nite
Groups: Jr. Nites
Label: Death Row Records/Death Row Records South
Scheduled Release Year: 1998
Project Status: Complete - Released 2001 under the title Lyrical Warfare via the labels Country Boy Records and Warlock Records.
Scheduled Singles: Gotta Have It
Years Signed: 1997 - 1998 (Contract expired in 2001)
Status: Official Artist

Biography:

   Chocolate Bandit dropped out of professional football in 1997 to pursue a rap career with Death Row Records. He signed a 3.4 Million dollar record deal with a new division of Death Row Records - Death Row South, thanks to his then representative Bo Blunt. Via Blunt's moves Chocolate Bandit's popularity in the Texas area started rising and had gained the attention of Death Row producer Reggie Moore. After Reggie and Chocolate working together on Chocolate's shelved debut LP - Lyrical Warfare/To The Extent things started getting ugly between various other artists and Chocolate Bandit. Tha Realest and Young Doobie, both Death Row inmates, teamed up against Chocolate Bandit and Blunt forcing Chocolate Bandit to be thrown off the label and pay Death Row royalties (such as his signing bonus) as well as give his 50,000 dollar chain back. After leaving Death Row and staying quiet a few years due to his album still being liscensed by Death Row, he re-emerged in 2001 with his album from Death Row - Lyrical Warfare. After releasing the album Chocolate Bandit faded away into the background of the music scene. He is said to be residing in Dallas, Texas.

Rumors:

Chocolate Bandit was apparently responsible for leaking various 2Pac songs in order to form the infamous 'Makaveli' bootleg series.

Facts:

Young Doobie stole Chocolate Bandit's beat for his own song "I'm Country". Chocolate Bandit's song was entitled Just Touch Me which featured the Jr. Nites and was produced by Curt Couthon better known as super producer Kurt Kobane.

Reggie Moore had the alias of Mo'sart on Chocolate Bandit's album most likely due to his ties with Death Row. Reggie Moore also did the speaking on the intro and outro.

Reggie Moore brought in Ali Woodson, a member of The Temptations and childhood friend of Reggie, to do vocal work for Chocolate Bandit's album.

Chocolate Bandit had beef with fellow labelmates Young Doobie and Tha Realest due to various factors mainly brought on by Tha Realest.

In the words of Blunt:

"Blunt also represented 3.4 million dollar Artist Chocalet Bandit whom Suge Knight signed to the Death Row South label. He was the first artist to sign with the south label,Death Row faced many problems after the Death of 2 Pac and Dre leaving the label. Since the Row could not break into top radio station K104.5 Fm. Blunt who was family with the Radio station and friend to the owner Hyman Childs. Blunt went into the office and set down with Hyman advising him after many hard years tring to get on a national level he had the opportunity to sign million dollar artist Chocalet Bandit. Blunt excepted the owners approval, and then went to program director and on air personality Skip Cheatham and got his approval Blunt then signed the artist under Blunt Tyme Management,and took the Ball and ran with it like Barry Sanders those that know me im a mover and shaker. I started breaking the artist on the air and geting him live performances with the station. Blunt's name then started to be talked about BIG by producer Reggie Mo who produced Toss it up for 2pac R.I.P. That he was a BIG fish in Dallas Texas and making moves for real. Blunt started to see problems ocurring with the artist and label. After Blunt confronted Death row artist The Realist about talking down on Blunt. Blunt saw the label kick chocalet Bandit to the curb because he and The Realist did not see Eye to Eye,and after heated telephone conversation with Forth Worth artist Doobie signed to death row and receiving a death threat one evening while Blunt was having a business meeting with the artist over the 50,000.00 Death row neckless Chocalet Bandit was wearing. Blunt advise client to call Reggie Mo to find out if the was orderd by Suge Knight and was told no. Blunt said send the 50k Neckless back to Death Row. Blunt then realize that it was time to cut the relationship off so Blunt sent Death Row a letter of resignation and moved on to other ventures."
 

Chad Vader

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #187 on: June 09, 2009, 11:37:01 AM »

<---- Thanks Ridah662/Legendz for the covers.

Above The Law - Death Row E.P
1. Sex Money and Music (Death Row Remix)
2. Cheese
3. Everywhere I Go (Og Version)
4. Gutta (Demo, Different Outro) feat Kokane
5. Interlude
6. Thats The Sound (Eazy-E Dedication)
7. Life (OG Version, Different Chrous) feat Kokane
8. 2 Killaz (Remix) feat Xzibit BONUS
9. Jackin' 4 Beats 2000 BONUS
Now with ID3 tags;
Above The Law - Death Row E.P


Kurupt - Row Rider
1. Intro
2. Im Back (OG)(alternate intro)
3. Throw Bacc Muzik Remix feat Petey Pablo
4. 4 Tha G'z
5. Riot In The Club
6. Gangsta Shit feat Roscoe
7. My Homeboyz Remix feat 2pac, Eastwood, Petey Pablo
8. U Dont Know Who U Fuckin' Wit (OG) feat Kokane
9. Every Spot That Be Crackin' feat Eastwood
10. Rollin' Down The Streetz feat Roscoe, Bree
11. U Know What Im Talkin' About
12. Just Like Me
Now with ID3 tags;
Kurupt; Row Rider


Nina - Let Me Live
1. Block Party Remix (feat Eastwood, Phobia)
2. Life (feat Eastwood, Danny Boy)
3. Let Me Live (feat Crooked I)
4. Universal Quest (feat Crooked I)
5. Rags 2 Riches (feat Kurupt)
6. Untouchable (feat 2Pac)
7. I Believe In Me
8. Hot Lanta (feat Kurupt, Juvenile)
9. Tru Confessions
10. Too Street For TV (feat Danny Boy)
11. Friends (feat Kurupt, Danny Boy)
Now with ID3 tags;
Nina - Let Me Live

2Pac Live E.P.
- Intro
- Ambitionz Az A Ridah
- Interlude 1
- I Ain't Mad At'cha
- Interlude 2
- How Do You Want It
- Shorty Wanna Be A Thug
- Few more interludes. LOL.
Now with ID3 tags;
2Pac Live E.P.


2pac leaks 2009;
Now with ID3 tags;
2pac leaks 2009;
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #188 on: June 11, 2009, 08:02:16 AM »

<---- Thanks Ridah662/Legendz for the covers.

Above The Law - Death Row E.P
1. Sex Money and Music (Death Row Remix)
2. Cheese
3. Everywhere I Go (Og Version)
4. Gutta (Demo, Different Outro) feat Kokane
5. Interlude
6. Thats The Sound (Eazy-E Dedication)
7. Life (OG Version, Different Chrous) feat Kokane
8. 2 Killaz (Remix) feat Xzibit BONUS
9. Jackin' 4 Beats 2000 BONUS
Now with ID3 tags;
Above The Law - Death Row E.P


Kurupt - Row Rider
1. Intro
2. Im Back (OG)(alternate intro)
3. Throw Bacc Muzik Remix feat Petey Pablo
4. 4 Tha G'z
5. Riot In The Club
6. Gangsta Shit feat Roscoe
7. My Homeboyz Remix feat 2pac, Eastwood, Petey Pablo
8. U Dont Know Who U Fuckin' Wit (OG) feat Kokane
9. Every Spot That Be Crackin' feat Eastwood
10. Rollin' Down The Streetz feat Roscoe, Bree
11. U Know What Im Talkin' About
12. Just Like Me
Now with ID3 tags;
Kurupt; Row Rider


Nina - Let Me Live
1. Block Party Remix (feat Eastwood, Phobia)
2. Life (feat Eastwood, Danny Boy)
3. Let Me Live (feat Crooked I)
4. Universal Quest (feat Crooked I)
5. Rags 2 Riches (feat Kurupt)
6. Untouchable (feat 2Pac)
7. I Believe In Me
8. Hot Lanta (feat Kurupt, Juvenile)
9. Tru Confessions
10. Too Street For TV (feat Danny Boy)
11. Friends (feat Kurupt, Danny Boy)
Now with ID3 tags;
Nina - Let Me Live

2Pac Live E.P.
- Intro
- Ambitionz Az A Ridah
- Interlude 1
- I Ain't Mad At'cha
- Interlude 2
- How Do You Want It
- Shorty Wanna Be A Thug
- Few more interludes. LOL.
Now with ID3 tags;
2Pac Live E.P.


2pac leaks 2009;
Now with ID3 tags;
2pac leaks 2009;

much propz chad.
 

Sriram619

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #189 on: June 12, 2009, 12:13:03 AM »
anyone know the name of this song or got this song its being played in inside death row at about 3.13 minutes .... sounds like an r&B track its pretty tight anyone know the name or got it i will link the video

 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #190 on: June 14, 2009, 05:11:04 AM »
Quote
"Here is some Death Row Records news that is out. We cannot verify all this, but things are hard to get verified at Tha Row. But according to reliable sources at SuperBrawl (PR Wayne); Petey Pablo has officially signed to Death Row.Records.
There is a new drop being readied from Death Row / Koch called ‘SuperBrawl Soundtrack’ featuring rappers Petey Pablo, Eastwood, Kurupt, Danny Boy, Too Cool, R Kelly, Ja Rule, Scarface, and Lloyd; also a special appearence by Tupac
The first major single off ‘SuperBrawl Soundtrack’ will be ‘Ghetto Honey’feat. Petey Pablo, Eastwood & Too Cool featuring R Kellyand produced by Lil Jon. There is no official release date yet.
Here is a track off the cd referred to as 'The SuperBrawl Theme Song'. It is Eastwood and a track called – ‘Put Ya Money Up’.
Also Suge has signed a new artist called Too Cool to Death Row Records along with Petey Pablo.  He is from LA and used to be signed to Tray Deee's label, 4 Life Records. He has left 4 Life."


thx 2 blakqout

Quote
Chronic 2 sessions facts -

California love (ghost writer version) - j-flexx
California love - dr dre
Note - dr dre’s 3 verse version w/ roger from zapp.

Blunt time (ghost version) - j-flexx
Blunt time - dr dre
Note - blunt time was recorded the same day as california love and was recorded at dre’s house w/ roger for zapp. Dre failed to give roger credit on talk box when it was released on aftermath compilation to avoid any problems with death row. Also there is no other version of this song (2pac, rage, sam sneed etc), if a version was done it would have been during the early start of aftermath and after death row.

“Back pay” (ghost version) - j-flexx
“Back pay” - dr dre
Note - very few people even know this song was recorded, if u happened to be at dre’s house or j-flexx’s camp would know about this song. The song was going at certain females dre was involved with and had james brown’s “pay back” sample. This is one of dre’s best song at death row.


Aside from maybe another 2-3 songs , that was all that was recorded for the chronic sessions. J-flexx was dr dre’s right hand man at time, he was doing “all” of dr dre’s ghost writing. drauma didn’t write anything for dr dre that was actually recorded until the aftermath thing popped off. a lot people tend to forgett dr dre had a really bad year in 95 (jail, easy died, 2pac arrived, suge taking control of company etc). jimmy also didn’t help the session, he was always telling dre not to start on another gangster rap album. Also to clear any rumors about suge taking dre’s vocals off of cali love and replacing them w/ pac is totally false. suge did not even have access to cali love because after 94 dre did not ever record anything at can am only at his house. 2pac was invited to dre’s house for the only session between the two. The only songs that were recorded was can’t c me & cali love, nothing more. The only other beat that dre gave to pac was toss it up (og) beat, but was not recorded together. The beat was later sold to blackstreet.


Been there, done that - was not recorded at d.r. at all. The reason for suge having credit to that song was when dre first left, j-flexx and sam sneed camp also left with him. The first songs that were recorded at aftermath j-flexx wrote both. A dr dre track ( been there) and a solo song for himself that was originally intened to be on the aftermath compilation. After a while j-flexx realized the dre was not going to help him get out his dr contract, flex decided to call suge and try to work things out. Suge was cool with idea and flexx returned. As soon as he got to the office he told suge he had written the new dr dre single and before flexx could finish his story, suge went straight to interscop with paper work and received a fat check from jimmy. Dr dre was not happy!!!!

Keep the heads - again another song that was recorded around the same time, but this song was strictly recorded for the Friday ost . There is a ghost version with flexx that is a lil more explicit. I don’t think many people realize this song is about bitches giving head. Priorty made dr dre tone down the lyrics a bit for the radio version

Og to bg - was recorded before the chronic sessions even started. Good song though.




thx 2 tigger @ thavaults.com and deathrowforum.com

 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #191 on: July 31, 2009, 02:56:50 PM »
Tha Realest Talks Tupac, Suge Knight And D.O.C.
July 31st, 2009 | Author: Paul W Arnold

Guerilla Black, former No Limit soldier Krazy, an early-in-his career Shyne, and others have been accused at one time or another over the last decade of emulating the vocal tones and rhyme styles of fallen Rap legends Tupac or Biggie Smalls a little too closely for the comfort of die-hard ‘Pac and B.I.G. fans. But one emcee who has arguably incurred the most hate-filled critiques of his vocal similarities to the late great Tupac Shakur is former Death Row Records artist Tha Realest. Speaking exclusively to HipHopDX earlier this week, Tha Realest addressed the never-ceasing commentary regarding his rhyme style, revealed that even ‘Pac himself co-signed him (along with countless artist allies of the west coast legend), broke down why he left ‘Pac’s last recording home once its controversial CEO resumed the reigns of the label, and explained why his persistent detractors are actually helping to promote his recently released full-length debut, Witness Tha Realest. 

Originally announced for release roughly 10 years ago, Witness Tha Realest took nearly a decade to reach store shelves due to his decision to leave Death Row, a scandalized second recording home (the founder of Realest’s post-Row label home, Tru ‘Dat’ Entertainment, was indicted in ’07 for accepting $8 million in forged tax returns), and the subsequent search for proper distribution for Realest’s long-delayed debut. But Realest’s post-Row struggles weren’t just a run of bad luck, but also his having been essentially blackballed from the major-label rap game, which forced him to have to sink or swim in the independent market.

“When I first left Death Row [in late 2001] there was a lot of negativity out there with labels kinda like scared to touch me,” Tha Realest explained to DX. “It wasn’t that they didn’t wanna fuck with me, they just didn’t wanna deal with the politics of the Death Row name anymore – all the negativity from the name. They loved me as an artist, but they just didn’t wanna deal with the negativity probably that was gonna come along with just the whole Suge [Knight] b.s.”

Tha Realest’s loyalty to his former label boss during Suge Knight’s five-year incarceration from 1996-2001 - refusing to jump ship from what had become the Titanic of Hip Hop record labels by the late ‘90’s - led to hundreds of recorded Realest songs but never an actual Realest album released. And so, just a few months after Suge Knight reassumed the reigns of his record label upon his release from prison, Tha Realest decided to finally take his career into in his own hands and escape from Death Row.

“One thing about Suge, niggas say bad shit about him, they say good shit about him,” began Realest, breaking down what led to his decision to leave Tha Row. “I went to go see Suge three days a week for every year he was in jail… Now through that time I was over there [at Death Row], I’m just tryin’ to hold the shit down ‘cause we didn’t think it was gonna end how it ended… Me and Crooked I [click to read], we was just tryin’ to keep that shit rollin’. The Swoop G’s, the Lil C-Style’s and everybody else who was over there that was fuckin’ wit’ us, we all believed in the same movement. That’s why we stuck around that shit so long. [But by late 2001] it was time for me to just get the fuck outta there. I’m sittin’ around and I’m seein’ the same shit. Ain’t shit movin’! You got a 150 songs on me, let’s go get some shit crackin’. And [Suge] was just like…his love for the shit, he just wasn’t fuckin’ with it at that time. So I gotta roll. I can’t sit around like this all day. I can do this on my own!”   

While the end of his association with Death Row was less than thrilling, the beginning of that journey was as exciting as it gets for any hungry-for-a-shot new artist. According to Tha Realest, the Dallas, Texas native had an impromptu audition for Tupac in Las Vegas in March of 1996 prior to the Mike Tyson/Frank Bruno fight. The then rhyme rookie was apparently given the thumbs up from ‘Pac and his crew, and subsequently began an association with Death Row that led to Realest formally signing a contract with the label after ‘Pac’s passing.

Debuting on the Gang Related Soundtrack (then known as Tenkamenin) in 1997, the southern spitter originally recorded a solo project entitled Inside Out for his new label home. Those songs were inexplicably re-directed to the Death Row Chronic 2000 compilation in 1999, which served as Tha Realest’s official coming out party as an artist, and officially began the scorn from some for his uncanny vocal similarities to Tupac.

“That’s how I been gettin’ down,” Realest explained of the organic origins of his husky-voiced flow. “[Death Row] didn’t step to me and say, ‘Hey, sound like ‘Pac’… Nah, I already was doin’ how I was doin’ everything back down south when I came out [to the west coast]. I wouldn’t come to nobody [and] say I’m tryin’ to sound like this dude. That’s not my getdown. I’m not no copycat emcee.”

“And when a lot of people try to say, ‘Aww this nigga think he ‘Pac,’” continued Realest. “Man, please. Why I’ma try to be another nigga and I’m on the same label with these cats? The artists over there would look at me crazy! Or niggas wouldn’t even fuck with me. Suge wouldn’t fuck with me. Niggas wouldn’t fuck with me. I’m on songs with every nigga that ‘Pac was fuckin’ with. His niggas who fucked with him fuck with me. E.D.I. Mean [click to read] got shit on [Witness Tha Realest]… I fucks with [E-40], Richie Rich, B-Legit – these my niggas! The Yukmouth’s, the C-Bo’s… So [that criticism of my flow is] just Internet muthafuckas who just want somethin’ to talk about or don’t know… It’s some little kid sittin’ at the crib, some muthafucka who don’t really just know me. And I don’t really [feel like I should] have to answer all these [criticisms] from all these cats, ‘cause that shit was 13 years ago and I done moved on with my career.”     

Moving on as best he can while enduring the constant critiques of his familiar flow, Tha Realest is going forward full-steam with not only his new solo album, but an in-the-works duo album with C-Bo, the long-awaited full-length retail release from his Regime crew (Yukmouth, Tech N9ne, etc), and a solo release under his original Rap moniker, Tenkamenin.

Tha Realest is also working with WIDEawake, the new owners of the Death Row catalog, so that some of his previously unreleased Row-recorded material will finally see the light of day in some form or fashion beginning next year.

And maybe his most noteworthy current undertaking is Tha Realest’s recent work with his Dallas Rap forefather, the legendary D.O.C. on a currently undetermined future project.

“Me and Doc, we rubbin’ a lot of ideas together right now,” Realest revealed. “He over in Hawaii, tightenin’ up that Detox. Y’all ain’t heard the last of Doc, homie. His pen is still the hardest pen I’ve witnessed in a long time. [And] the stuff that I’m hearing him do right now for that Detox is phenomenal. Believe me when I tell you man, when you hear that shit that they put out it’s gonna be some bomb, classic-ass shit.”

But before his work with The D.O.C., The Regime, and C-Bo reaches the masses, Tha Realest is firmly focused on seeing to it that his decade-in-the-making debut doesn’t disappear from the Hip Hop consciousness just two weeks after its release by Team Dime Entertainment - the label operated by the brother of Atlanta Hawks star Mike Bibby.

And Witness Tha Realest is definitely deserved of the attention of the Hip Hop nation. While some may balk at Realest’s rhyme style on the album, those who give his debut LP a chance will discover one of the most polished independent Hip Hop releases of ’09.

“The production [from Mel Man, The Underdogs, Blaqthoven, etc] is off-the-chain,” Realest noted. “The guest appearances are off-the-chain, from the Fat Joe’s, to the C-Bo’s, to Crooked I, Yukmouth, E.D.I. Mean, Sean Paul from the Youngbloodz is on it, Devin The Dude… [And] I’m a force to reckon wit’. All the negative shit you heard about me, I congratulate all the bustas who spread the word, now they really fin to see what type of cat I am.”     

Witness Tha Realest is in stores now on Team Dime/RBC Records.
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #192 on: August 02, 2009, 06:55:51 AM »
2 Tracks Off Top Dogg´s "Renegade"

"Close 2 U"
"Dreams Of Gettin Rich"

 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #193 on: August 12, 2009, 05:14:01 AM »
Michel´le Interview






Shout Out 2 Inmate @ DeathRowForum
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #194 on: August 12, 2009, 05:37:43 AM »
Making Of "Still I Rise" 


 

3dfan

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #195 on: August 12, 2009, 08:07:46 AM »
Chocolate Bandit
Real Name: William A. Green
Aliases: Junior Nite
Groups: Jr. Nites
Label: Death Row Records/Death Row Records South
Scheduled Release Year: 1998
Project Status: Complete - Released 2001 under the title Lyrical Warfare via the labels Country Boy Records and Warlock Records.
Scheduled Singles: Gotta Have It
Years Signed: 1997 - 1998 (Contract expired in 2001)
Status: Official Artist

Biography:

   Chocolate Bandit dropped out of professional football in 1997 to pursue a rap career with Death Row Records. He signed a 3.4 Million dollar record deal with a new division of Death Row Records - Death Row South, thanks to his then representative Bo Blunt. Via Blunt's moves Chocolate Bandit's popularity in the Texas area started rising and had gained the attention of Death Row producer Reggie Moore. After Reggie and Chocolate working together on Chocolate's shelved debut LP - Lyrical Warfare/To The Extent things started getting ugly between various other artists and Chocolate Bandit. Tha Realest and Young Doobie, both Death Row inmates, teamed up against Chocolate Bandit and Blunt forcing Chocolate Bandit to be thrown off the label and pay Death Row royalties (such as his signing bonus) as well as give his 50,000 dollar chain back. After leaving Death Row and staying quiet a few years due to his album still being liscensed by Death Row, he re-emerged in 2001 with his album from Death Row - Lyrical Warfare. After releasing the album Chocolate Bandit faded away into the background of the music scene. He is said to be residing in Dallas, Texas.

Rumors:

Chocolate Bandit was apparently responsible for leaking various 2Pac songs in order to form the infamous 'Makaveli' bootleg series.

Facts:

Young Doobie stole Chocolate Bandit's beat for his own song "I'm Country". Chocolate Bandit's song was entitled Just Touch Me which featured the Jr. Nites and was produced by Curt Couthon better known as super producer Kurt Kobane.

Reggie Moore had the alias of Mo'sart on Chocolate Bandit's album most likely due to his ties with Death Row. Reggie Moore also did the speaking on the intro and outro.

Reggie Moore brought in Ali Woodson, a member of The Temptations and childhood friend of Reggie, to do vocal work for Chocolate Bandit's album.

Chocolate Bandit had beef with fellow labelmates Young Doobie and Tha Realest due to various factors mainly brought on by Tha Realest.

In the words of Blunt:

"Blunt also represented 3.4 million dollar Artist Chocalet Bandit whom Suge Knight signed to the Death Row South label. He was the first artist to sign with the south label,Death Row faced many problems after the Death of 2 Pac and Dre leaving the label. Since the Row could not break into top radio station K104.5 Fm. Blunt who was family with the Radio station and friend to the owner Hyman Childs. Blunt went into the office and set down with Hyman advising him after many hard years tring to get on a national level he had the opportunity to sign million dollar artist Chocalet Bandit. Blunt excepted the owners approval, and then went to program director and on air personality Skip Cheatham and got his approval Blunt then signed the artist under Blunt Tyme Management,and took the Ball and ran with it like Barry Sanders those that know me im a mover and shaker. I started breaking the artist on the air and geting him live performances with the station. Blunt's name then started to be talked about BIG by producer Reggie Mo who produced Toss it up for 2pac R.I.P. That he was a BIG fish in Dallas Texas and making moves for real. Blunt started to see problems ocurring with the artist and label. After Blunt confronted Death row artist The Realist about talking down on Blunt. Blunt saw the label kick chocalet Bandit to the curb because he and The Realist did not see Eye to Eye,and after heated telephone conversation with Forth Worth artist Doobie signed to death row and receiving a death threat one evening while Blunt was having a business meeting with the artist over the 50,000.00 Death row neckless Chocalet Bandit was wearing. Blunt advise client to call Reggie Mo to find out if the was orderd by Suge Knight and was told no. Blunt said send the 50k Neckless back to Death Row. Blunt then realize that it was time to cut the relationship off so Blunt sent Death Row a letter of resignation and moved on to other ventures."

Thank you so much for posting this detailed info - very cool post!
love red wine   )))
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #196 on: August 12, 2009, 03:07:51 PM »
where can i unreleased songs lists?pdf´files?
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #197 on: August 19, 2009, 04:08:39 AM »
TORONTO -- Newly resurrected rap label Death Row Records is expanding into film production.

Death Row Records CEO Lara Lavi said her new Death Row Films division is set to shoot "Sons 2 the Grave" in Toronto in October, with Tonya Lee Williams, Dorian Harewood, K.C. Collins ("Flashpoint") and child actor Cameron Miles Jones on board.

The indie hood drama, written and produced by Lynn Stoltz and near to signing a director, features Collins as a young basketball phenom returning to an embattled inner-city ghetto after two gunshots cut short his dream of an NBA career.

"This film embodies what we're trying to do with Death Row, to tell human stories that don't always have happy endings, and that allow us to learn from violence and disenfranchised lives, but not glorify it," Lavi said.

WIDEawake Entertainment Group, Lavi's Toronto-based shingle, acquired Death Row Records out of bankruptcy in January for $18 million.

Death Row Films will tap the rap label's catalog to score "Sons 2 the Grave," before moving on to other projects.

"We're looking at film properties that relate to "Boyz n the Hood"-type stories, and to power the films with Death Row music," Lavi said.

She added the Death Row library, which includes iconic songs and albums by Tupac Shakur, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg and Danny Boy, is barely exploited.

"We're sitting here with 10,000 masters, of which only 10%-15% have been released to the public," she said.

Death Row Records is licensing its songs to film, TV, video game and advertising producers, including to EA Games, and the "CSI" and "Cold Case" TV series.

Music publisher Evergreen Copyrights is providing worldwide administration for the rap label.

And Death Row Records is also to rerelease on Sept. 1 Dr. Dre's "The Chronic." "The Chronic Re-lit" collectors disc will feature 16 original songs and seven new tunes, and unreleased video of Dre and other artists.

Death Row is also readying boxed sets of unreleased master recordings for the holiday season.
 

2euce 7even

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Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #198 on: August 26, 2009, 05:28:56 AM »
Short Interview With Redrum aka Redrum 781 Of Damu Ridas/Death Row:

How Did It Happen That You And Bloody Mary Didn´t Release Somethin´ On Death Row?


1) BECAUSE SUGE KNIGHT HAD US ON HOLD SO WE COULDNT COME OUT.

Who Was On Your Death Row Album?

2) A LOT OF THE PRODUCERS,THE RAPPERS WERE OUT FOR SELF,I BROUGHT IN MY OWN SPITTERS

What´s Up Wit Lil Hawk aka Lil Hawksta From Krenshaw Mafia?


3) THATS MY DOG,BUT I HAVE'NT TALKED TO HIM SINCE I WAS ALMOST ASSASSINATED AT MY HOME

Was You Part Of Young Soldierz?

4)NO PART,JUST DID VERSES THATS ALL. MY CREW WAS / IS the California Kennel Gang

What´s Up With Green Eyez, G-Len, Who Was Rapping As "O.G"?


5)GREEN EYES WENT GOSPEL,G-LEN A PIMP,DONT KNOW BOUT LiLi.....NOBODY WAS O.G AT THE TIME,I STILL CALL MYSELF AN O.Y.G.

Who You Fu*k Wit In The Industry, What U Bumpin?

6)MY BROTHER CK, BIG WY,DOG,DOCK B,BIG FREEZE,G-LUV,SQUEAK RU,KAM,ROSCOE,SLIP CAPONE AND A FEW OTHERS...AINT FEELIN OF KICKIN IT WITH NO INDUSTRY BLOOD RAPPERS......

Will U Release The Death Row Material You Have, Who Did The Beats?

7)NAH NOT REALLY,THEY WERENT MIXED,MY NIGGAS I HAND PICKED RAPPED ON IT,THE DEATH ROW PRODUCERS DID THE BEATS,BUT NOT DAZ
Givin´Gangsta Props On "Deep In Tha Game" Off "2 Gangsta 4 Radio II" Project, Dedicated 2 Pac And His Homie "Marvin"..

8)UMM.......I GOTTA BETTER VERSION OF THAT SONG. THE ONE THATS PUT IS SHITTY QUALITY.

 

Chad Vader

  • Guest
Re: THE DEFINITIVE Death Row Records/Tha Row Thread
« Reply #199 on: September 25, 2009, 07:22:46 PM »
Quote
213 - St. Ides EP
http://deathrowtapes.blogspot.com/2009/08/213-st-ides-ep.html

Here's a promo EP that was released from St. Ides with the group 213. If you ain't know 213 is comprised of Snoop, Warren G, and Nate Dogg. This some extra special rare shit. Shout out to my boy Tha Jsta of Back 2 Da OG for posting this on his blog.


http://rs704.rapidshare.com/files/271525663/1994_--_St._Ides_94__Promo_Cassette_.rar
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01. St. Ides In The LBC02. When We Sippin On The Brew03. Drank Anthem04. Dogg Food & Drank