Author Topic: What will be Aftermath's legacy?  (Read 2374 times)

Chad Vader

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2008, 07:30:50 PM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".





This fit here and now that it seems too be "confirmed" by "official" source´s I might as well post it here;
Quote
Busta Rhymes off the Math
July 17th, 2008 by admin

http://www.aftermathmusic.com/blog/?p=50

It’s official - Busta Rhymes got dropped from Interscope/Aftermath. It was reported that Busta Rhymes was dropped from Interscope due to a heated argument with Jimmy Iovine. He later confirmed that the album would be released in late September on Aftermath. www.Aftermathmusic.com contacted the general manager of Aftermath.

“Yes, it’s true. He got dropped.”, so the General Manager of Aftermath.

“Blessed” is scheduled to release in September, but not on Aftermath.
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #51 on: July 18, 2008, 03:24:51 AM »
Jimmy Iovine is full of shit.

Aww he got hurt feelings with Busta who propably spoke the truth and kicked him out with bleeding tears. Poor hip hop killing faggot, please don't kill yourself, go eat some pretzels with Birdman.
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #52 on: July 18, 2008, 10:36:05 AM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".



I think the Ruthless situation is different - because the big albums Aftermath has put out were also very critically acclaimed... while outside of this forum I don't really know anyone who thinks the unreleased King T or Hittman albums are like WOW - a lot of people have the King T one and most people are like, phew, good thing he didn't put this out, because it's not really that great, and reviews of it were just kind of 'meh'. Also Aftermath spends a lot on promotion, making an expensive video, etc etc - they don't want to lose potentially millions on promoting something that is not going to break even


 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #53 on: July 18, 2008, 11:59:57 AM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".



I think the Ruthless situation is different - because the big albums Aftermath has put out were also very critically acclaimed... while outside of this forum I don't really know anyone who thinks the unreleased King T or Hittman albums are like WOW - a lot of people have the King T one and most people are like, phew, good thing he didn't put this out, because it's not really that great, and reviews of it were just kind of 'meh'. Also Aftermath spends a lot on promotion, making an expensive video, etc etc - they don't want to lose potentially millions on promoting something that is not going to break even




well if you think about it, they are already flushing millions through the toilet....

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #54 on: July 18, 2008, 12:18:52 PM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".



I think the Ruthless situation is different - because the big albums Aftermath has put out were also very critically acclaimed... while outside of this forum I don't really know anyone who thinks the unreleased King T or Hittman albums are like WOW - a lot of people have the King T one and most people are like, phew, good thing he didn't put this out, because it's not really that great, and reviews of it were just kind of 'meh'. Also Aftermath spends a lot on promotion, making an expensive video, etc etc - they don't want to lose potentially millions on promoting something that is not going to break even




well if you think about it, they are already flushing millions through the toilet....
Yeah...Dre could've already released 2 albums and I'm sure they would've had at least good reviews and sold like shit...instead he is trying to model a masterpiece that is now a joke with no buzz and propably will go down as a VERY VERY BIG letdown if it isn't The Chronic like revolution.
And how wouldn't Raekwon sell with Aftermaths backing up? C'mon now, that's ridiculous.
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #55 on: July 18, 2008, 12:33:44 PM »
dre dont wanna tarnish his legacy by puttin somethin out thats not an absolute classic. he shaped the sound of an entire generation of hip hop, not once, twice, but three times!!! think about that. nwa and both chronic albums had everyone followin the leader. he was able to make us forget about been there done that (and if u remember, he was just about done after that) cuz he came with a super classic. but if detox flops, he might be done :(
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #56 on: July 18, 2008, 07:46:34 PM »
Damn, has everyone gone insane? Aftermath is probably in the top 3 greatest HipHop labels ever, and they're easily one of the biggest selling, Eminem, Dre, 50 Cent - those are three of the biggest HipHop artists ever! Who sold big AND are critically acclaimed

Aftermath has sold more records than Death Row by a large margin - 50 sold about 25 million, Eminem about 45 million, Dre sold 6 million of 2001... compared with Death Row selling 3 million of the Chronic, Doggystyle 4 million, and 2Pac about 15 million
Death Row had more 'classic' stuff, though only thanks to Dre anyway... and Eminem's first two records, 2001, and 50's first record are all highly acclaimed

Bad Boy sold a lot, but is a 99% a joke in terms of credibility (apart from Biggie), same with No Limit, they don't have any really classic stuff

The only label that probably beats both Aftermath and Death Row is Def Jam just because they have so many classic records and had such a huge influence in getting HipHop onto the level it is now


I'm probably forgetting some labels off the top of my head, but Aftermath is definitely up there


what about Ruthless?
Quote from: Now_I_Know on September 10, 2001, 04:19:36 PM
This guy aint no crip, and I'm 100% sure on that because he doesn't type like a crip, I know crips, and that fool is not a crip.


"I went from being homeless strung out on Dust to an 8 bedroom estate signed 2 1 of my fav rappers... Pump it up jokes can't hurt me."-- Mr. Joey Buddens
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #57 on: July 19, 2008, 08:33:18 AM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".




yeah aftermath is limiting it's focus to such stars.

they should stop betting on one horse.



Chad Vader

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #58 on: July 19, 2008, 10:20:55 AM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".



I think the Ruthless situation is different - because the big albums Aftermath has put out were also very critically acclaimed...
while outside of this forum I don't really know anyone who thinks the unreleased King T or Hittman albums are like WOW
- a lot of people have the King T one and most people are like, phew, good thing he didn't put this out,
because it's not really that great, and reviews of it were just kind of 'meh'.
Also Aftermath spends a lot on promotion, making an expensive video, etc etc
- they don't want to lose potentially millions on promoting something that is not going to break even


I said fan favorites  ;).
The King T album got average reviews/ratings by both The Source and Rap Pages read; official Hip Hop media.
We could agree or disagree that they´re biased,but that´s another convo that can be continued here;
Open letter to The Source Mag. about your reviews and ratings of West Coast *poll*

Quote
reviews
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=150824.msg1640421#msg1640421
King T review in The Source September 1998 NO.108



If interscope don´t feel that albums from artists such as King T and Hittman ain´t blockbuster material,
don´t spend so much money on promotion,just release it on the low.
Not everything has to be "block buster material".


Related links;
MC Ren reviews
Above The Law reviews

 

Dre-Day

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #59 on: July 19, 2008, 10:36:28 AM »
I really hope for Dre that he get out the contract with Interscope after "Detox"
so that he can founds a new label where nobody tell him what he has to do and what not.

....or before  ;)

I'm little tired of Aftermath and the whole drama around them,  :P
as many has pointed out before,Jimmy interferes too much with the creative side of things.




Dre didn't bring out King T because it would have flopped, he didn't bring out Hitman because it would have flopped
- if he'd let those albums come out Aftermath would have been in way worse shape...
but instead he put out Eminem and 50 Cent

- you can't argue with the success they've had, they're arguable the two most well know people in HipHop!

Dre didn't decide that, interscope did.
Dre actually wanted to put out a hittman and a King T album :P


The label (and the industry as a whole) got too obsessed with the "block buster mentality"  :-\(read; first week sales),  :-\
that anything that might get looked as a flop would damage the "block buster legacy" Aftermath got.  :P
But I believe that in the long run,releasing some albums that don't have that "block buster stamp" over them would actually benefit them.
Look at Ruthless,Above The Law and Ren´s solo releases was never a big success. Bone Thugs and Eazy took care of the "block buster" numbers.
Never the less Above The Law and Ren´s solo albums was fan favorites that took care of the Ruthless legacy of putting out "quality" music.
Hittman and King T could be one of those type of artists,
as far I'm concerned I think the "unreleased" Hittman and King T album is amongst the top five album from the "Aftermath Camp".



I think the Ruthless situation is different - because the big albums Aftermath has put out were also very critically acclaimed... while outside of this forum I don't really know anyone who thinks the unreleased King T or Hittman albums are like WOW - a lot of people have the King T one and most people are like, phew, good thing he didn't put this out, because it's not really that great, and reviews of it were just kind of 'meh'. Also Aftermath spends a lot on promotion, making an expensive video, etc etc - they don't want to lose potentially millions on promoting something that is not going to break even

i agree that limiting the damage is better than causing maximum damage,
but let's not forget that several album budgets went to waste, so i don't see why you sort of implied that aftermath is working cost-efficiently.





« Last Edit: July 19, 2008, 10:41:32 AM by Dre-Day »
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #60 on: September 08, 2008, 10:56:33 PM »
I feel that overall, Dre's been successful, but I don't think the legacy of Aftermath has lived up to it's full potential or even 60-70% of it. I think it could have been what Def Jam was and still is, but management wise and talent wise, I feel that the many mistakes that were made will be out-shined by the major accomplishments that the successful artists have had.

I think Aftermath's strength has been at building diamonds in the rough, and taking artists that are virtually unknown or only regionally known and making them into superstars...that's apparent with 50, Em, and Game. However...aside from them and a few others, I feel that the label has fell short in making artists become superstars, whether it's because they never even got to release an album, or because they never had the potential to become a star from the jump. I feel that Aftermath is the type of label that makes sure that every artist that comes through has that "Aftermath" sound to them, whether it fits or not. This is how Death Row, Cash Money, and No Limit functioned...but one reason Def Jam is still seen as the #1 label in history is because they have adapted to the times and the sounds of the artists without having to have a "family trademarked sound" as these other labels. Def Jam let Warren G sound like Warren G, even when no other artists were on the label representing the West.

I think the fact that Dre has to have a major hand in every single project has been a gift and a curse. It's an obvious gift because he's arguably the best executive producer and song producer in rap history...but I can imagine how hard it is to be the producer, AND exec. producer, AND the founder/owner of the label who sees everything. This can create conflicts of interest between him and artists when it comes to their vision, and he basically has the final word on every project that goes through or gets scrapped, which can be good or bad.

I feel that the label now has the stigma of benching and dropping artists to the extent that the label has lost some of it's verbal prestige...meaning that when somebody says "I'm signed to Aftermath," people are like "oh for real? So when you gonna get dropped...oh shit, I mean, when you gonna drop?" I feel this is a direct result of Dre being the "EVERYTHING" at the label...although he still has much help in every area, such as the production/beat making and executive level. Every label has artists that are signed and never put out...but if you look at Aftermath since it's creation 12 years ago, only SEVEN artists have come out and put out albums....with one being Dre himself. Quality is better than quantity...so this may be much better than No Limit putting out 15-20 artists per year....but it is still a far cry from what other labels have done, especially since only 5 of those 7 acts had commercially successful releases and only 3 stayed with the company past the first album (one being Dre himself).

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #61 on: September 08, 2008, 11:03:42 PM »
I feel that overall, Dre's been successful, but I don't think the legacy of Aftermath has lived up to it's full potential or even 60-70% of it. I think it could have been what Def Jam was and still is, but management wise and talent wise, I feel that the many mistakes that were made will be out-shined by the major accomplishments that the successful artists have had.

I think Aftermath's strength has been at building diamonds in the rough, and taking artists that are virtually unknown or only regionally known and making them into superstars...that's apparent with 50, Em, and Game. However...aside from them and a few others, I feel that the label has fell short in making artists become superstars, whether it's because they never even got to release an album, or because they never had the potential to become a star from the jump. I feel that Aftermath is the type of label that makes sure that every artist that comes through has that "Aftermath" sound to them, whether it fits or not. This is how Death Row, Cash Money, and No Limit functioned...but one reason Def Jam is still seen as the #1 label in history is because they have adapted to the times and the sounds of the artists without having to have a "family trademarked sound" as these other labels. Def Jam let Warren G sound like Warren G, even when no other artists were on the label representing the West.

I think the fact that Dre has to have a major hand in every single project has been a gift and a curse. It's an obvious gift because he's arguably the best executive producer and song producer in rap history...but I can imagine how hard it is to be the producer, AND exec. producer, AND the founder/owner of the label who sees everything. This can create conflicts of interest between him and artists when it comes to their vision, and he basically has the final word on every project that goes through or gets scrapped, which can be good or bad.

I feel that the label now has the stigma of benching and dropping artists to the extent that the label has lost some of it's verbal prestige...meaning that when somebody says "I'm signed to Aftermath," people are like "oh for real? So when you gonna get dropped...oh shit, I mean, when you gonna drop?" I feel this is a direct result of Dre being the "EVERYTHING" at the label...although he still has much help in every area, such as the production/beat making and executive level. Every label has artists that are signed and never put out...but if you look at Aftermath since it's creation 12 years ago, only SEVEN artists have come out and put out albums....with one being Dre himself. Quality is better than quantity...so this may be much better than No Limit putting out 15-20 artists per year....but it is still a far cry from what other labels have done, especially since only 5 of those 7 acts had commercially successful releases and only 3 stayed with the company past the first album (one being Dre himself).


I haven't read any replies in this thread, because I noticed R-tistic's thread got merged after the fact, but here's my reply to R-tistic.

I can't question Dre's business ethics when it comes to Aftermath artists getting dropped, but I have a feeling that Dre's boss, Jimmy Iovine has the REAL FINAL SAY in most of these matters. Afterall, if Jimmy don't like it, he don't have to finance it through Interscope. Interscope takes precedence over Aftermath.
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #62 on: September 08, 2008, 11:37:44 PM »
I feel that overall, Dre's been successful, but I don't think the legacy of Aftermath has lived up to it's full potential or even 60-70% of it. I think it could have been what Def Jam was and still is, but management wise and talent wise, I feel that the many mistakes that were made will be out-shined by the major accomplishments that the successful artists have had.

I think Aftermath's strength has been at building diamonds in the rough, and taking artists that are virtually unknown or only regionally known and making them into superstars...that's apparent with 50, Em, and Game. However...aside from them and a few others, I feel that the label has fell short in making artists become superstars, whether it's because they never even got to release an album, or because they never had the potential to become a star from the jump. I feel that Aftermath is the type of label that makes sure that every artist that comes through has that "Aftermath" sound to them, whether it fits or not. This is how Death Row, Cash Money, and No Limit functioned...but one reason Def Jam is still seen as the #1 label in history is because they have adapted to the times and the sounds of the artists without having to have a "family trademarked sound" as these other labels. Def Jam let Warren G sound like Warren G, even when no other artists were on the label representing the West.

I think the fact that Dre has to have a major hand in every single project has been a gift and a curse. It's an obvious gift because he's arguably the best executive producer and song producer in rap history...but I can imagine how hard it is to be the producer, AND exec. producer, AND the founder/owner of the label who sees everything. This can create conflicts of interest between him and artists when it comes to their vision, and he basically has the final word on every project that goes through or gets scrapped, which can be good or bad.

I feel that the label now has the stigma of benching and dropping artists to the extent that the label has lost some of it's verbal prestige...meaning that when somebody says "I'm signed to Aftermath," people are like "oh for real? So when you gonna get dropped...oh shit, I mean, when you gonna drop?" I feel this is a direct result of Dre being the "EVERYTHING" at the label...although he still has much help in every area, such as the production/beat making and executive level. Every label has artists that are signed and never put out...but if you look at Aftermath since it's creation 12 years ago, only SEVEN artists have come out and put out albums....with one being Dre himself. Quality is better than quantity...so this may be much better than No Limit putting out 15-20 artists per year....but it is still a far cry from what other labels have done, especially since only 5 of those 7 acts had commercially successful releases and only 3 stayed with the company past the first album (one being Dre himself).


I haven't read any replies in this thread, because I noticed R-tistic's thread got merged after the fact, but here's my reply to R-tistic.

I can't question Dre's business ethics when it comes to Aftermath artists getting dropped, but I have a feeling that Dre's boss, Jimmy Iovine has the REAL FINAL SAY in most of these matters. Afterall, if Jimmy don't like it, he don't have to finance it through Interscope. Interscope takes precedence over Aftermath.
Even more now when Jimmy owns the whole label. More artists began to drop (who would've though Busta would get dropped).
I'm surprised Jimmy haven't said to Dre that drop or get dropped (well can't know for sure).
If Detox/Em-album won't get released in 2 years, then pretty much the label should be shutdown since none other artist will be released without them backing up with features.
 

Jimmy H.

Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #63 on: September 08, 2008, 11:55:04 PM »
I feel that overall, Dre's been successful, but I don't think the legacy of Aftermath has lived up to it's full potential or even 60-70% of it. I think it could have been what Def Jam was and still is, but management wise and talent wise, I feel that the many mistakes that were made will be out-shined by the major accomplishments that the successful artists have had.

I think Aftermath's strength has been at building diamonds in the rough, and taking artists that are virtually unknown or only regionally known and making them into superstars...that's apparent with 50, Em, and Game. However...aside from them and a few others, I feel that the label has fell short in making artists become superstars, whether it's because they never even got to release an album, or because they never had the potential to become a star from the jump. I feel that Aftermath is the type of label that makes sure that every artist that comes through has that "Aftermath" sound to them, whether it fits or not. This is how Death Row, Cash Money, and No Limit functioned...but one reason Def Jam is still seen as the #1 label in history is because they have adapted to the times and the sounds of the artists without having to have a "family trademarked sound" as these other labels. Def Jam let Warren G sound like Warren G, even when no other artists were on the label representing the West.

I think the fact that Dre has to have a major hand in every single project has been a gift and a curse. It's an obvious gift because he's arguably the best executive producer and song producer in rap history...but I can imagine how hard it is to be the producer, AND exec. producer, AND the founder/owner of the label who sees everything. This can create conflicts of interest between him and artists when it comes to their vision, and he basically has the final word on every project that goes through or gets scrapped, which can be good or bad.

I feel that the label now has the stigma of benching and dropping artists to the extent that the label has lost some of it's verbal prestige...meaning that when somebody says "I'm signed to Aftermath," people are like "oh for real? So when you gonna get dropped...oh shit, I mean, when you gonna drop?" I feel this is a direct result of Dre being the "EVERYTHING" at the label...although he still has much help in every area, such as the production/beat making and executive level. Every label has artists that are signed and never put out...but if you look at Aftermath since it's creation 12 years ago, only SEVEN artists have come out and put out albums....with one being Dre himself. Quality is better than quantity...so this may be much better than No Limit putting out 15-20 artists per year....but it is still a far cry from what other labels have done, especially since only 5 of those 7 acts had commercially successful releases and only 3 stayed with the company past the first album (one being Dre himself).

Def Jam and Aftermath are not the same type of labels so i don't think the comparison is even worth making. Now seems like the hot moment to underride Dre's current situation and accomplishments but Aftermath is still relevant after over a decade. Thier future may be questionable but they are doing better than Death Row after Interscope stepped away and stand to do better than Ruthless once N.W.A. was no more. The fact that they are still around given the state of the music industry actually says something. No artists on Death Row or Ruthless before or after Dre left either had their own sublabels like G-Unit or Shady. Which labels is it a far cry from? Name some of these labels that have two or three stars whose are bigger names than their C.E.O./producer without him throwing his shit all over their projects. Diddy has never played the background long enough to pull a 50 Cent or Eminem or even Game. His whole label revolves around him and his publicity stunts. All of the releases at Doggystyle are groups presented by and featuring Snoop. Roc-A-Fella? G-Unit? Murder Inc? All partly run by the biggest act on the label. Only one of them still has a major household name superstar still on the label that doesn't have an owning interest in the company. Seven artists is nothing to look down at. There are maybe four labels around that are in the same league as Aftermath and only two have been around as long. Say what you will but his reign at Aftermath has been longer and more succesful than the ones at Death Row and Ruthless. The guy is doing something right.
 

Jynxx

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #64 on: September 09, 2008, 01:08:28 AM »
why does everybody keep sayin the marshal mathers lp was a classic from eminem??? i thought the slim shady lp was way doper...

Chad Vader

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #65 on: September 09, 2008, 01:42:38 AM »
I can't question Dre's business ethics when it comes to Aftermath artists getting dropped,
but I have a feeling that Dre's boss,Jimmy Iovine has the REAL FINAL SAY in most of these matters.
Afterall, if Jimmy don't like it, he don't have to finance it through Interscope. Interscope takes precedence over Aftermath.


Even more now when Jimmy owns the whole label. More artists began to drop (who would've though Busta would get dropped).
I'm surprised Jimmy haven't said to Dre that drop or get dropped (well can't know for sure).
If Detox/Em-album won't get released in 2 years,
then pretty much the label should be shutdown since none other artist will be released without them backing up with features.


Aftermath was started as a joint venture between Dre and Interscope.
Does that mean Interscope owned 50% of Aftermath or they were just entitled to 50% of the profits?
Dre sold 30% of his share to Interscope a while back so that means he either currently owns 20% or 80% of Aftermath.




How much of Aftermath does Jimmy actually own?
I've read everything from 50 to 100%  :P (can a official source/site confirm the numbers?)
 

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #66 on: September 09, 2008, 01:56:55 AM »
Aftermath was started as a joint venture between Dre and Interscope.
Does that mean Interscope owned 50% of Aftermath or they were just entitled to 50% of the profits?
Dre sold 30% of his share to Interscope a while back so that means he either currently owns 20% or 80% of Aftermath.

yeah it started as a joint feature; Dre had 30%.
not sure if interscope fully owned 70% as i'm not aware of any other stockholders.


R-Tistic

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #67 on: September 09, 2008, 01:07:21 PM »
I feel that overall, Dre's been successful, but I don't think the legacy of Aftermath has lived up to it's full potential or even 60-70% of it. I think it could have been what Def Jam was and still is, but management wise and talent wise, I feel that the many mistakes that were made will be out-shined by the major accomplishments that the successful artists have had.

I think Aftermath's strength has been at building diamonds in the rough, and taking artists that are virtually unknown or only regionally known and making them into superstars...that's apparent with 50, Em, and Game. However...aside from them and a few others, I feel that the label has fell short in making artists become superstars, whether it's because they never even got to release an album, or because they never had the potential to become a star from the jump. I feel that Aftermath is the type of label that makes sure that every artist that comes through has that "Aftermath" sound to them, whether it fits or not. This is how Death Row, Cash Money, and No Limit functioned...but one reason Def Jam is still seen as the #1 label in history is because they have adapted to the times and the sounds of the artists without having to have a "family trademarked sound" as these other labels. Def Jam let Warren G sound like Warren G, even when no other artists were on the label representing the West.

I think the fact that Dre has to have a major hand in every single project has been a gift and a curse. It's an obvious gift because he's arguably the best executive producer and song producer in rap history...but I can imagine how hard it is to be the producer, AND exec. producer, AND the founder/owner of the label who sees everything. This can create conflicts of interest between him and artists when it comes to their vision, and he basically has the final word on every project that goes through or gets scrapped, which can be good or bad.

I feel that the label now has the stigma of benching and dropping artists to the extent that the label has lost some of it's verbal prestige...meaning that when somebody says "I'm signed to Aftermath," people are like "oh for real? So when you gonna get dropped...oh shit, I mean, when you gonna drop?" I feel this is a direct result of Dre being the "EVERYTHING" at the label...although he still has much help in every area, such as the production/beat making and executive level. Every label has artists that are signed and never put out...but if you look at Aftermath since it's creation 12 years ago, only SEVEN artists have come out and put out albums....with one being Dre himself. Quality is better than quantity...so this may be much better than No Limit putting out 15-20 artists per year....but it is still a far cry from what other labels have done, especially since only 5 of those 7 acts had commercially successful releases and only 3 stayed with the company past the first album (one being Dre himself).

Def Jam and Aftermath are not the same type of labels so i don't think the comparison is even worth making. Now seems like the hot moment to underride Dre's current situation and accomplishments but Aftermath is still relevant after over a decade. Thier future may be questionable but they are doing better than Death Row after Interscope stepped away and stand to do better than Ruthless once N.W.A. was no more. The fact that they are still around given the state of the music industry actually says something. No artists on Death Row or Ruthless before or after Dre left either had their own sublabels like G-Unit or Shady. Which labels is it a far cry from? Name some of these labels that have two or three stars whose are bigger names than their C.E.O./producer without him throwing his shit all over their projects. Diddy has never played the background long enough to pull a 50 Cent or Eminem or even Game. His whole label revolves around him and his publicity stunts. All of the releases at Doggystyle are groups presented by and featuring Snoop. Roc-A-Fella? G-Unit? Murder Inc? All partly run by the biggest act on the label. Only one of them still has a major household name superstar still on the label that doesn't have an owning interest in the company. Seven artists is nothing to look down at. There are maybe four labels around that are in the same league as Aftermath and only two have been around as long. Say what you will but his reign at Aftermath has been longer and more succesful than the ones at Death Row and Ruthless. The guy is doing something right.

I think my post can be seen as being a knock at Dre, possibly because the tone sounds negative...when I was really just speaking on how I feel Aftermath could have been even more successful than it already has been.

Of course, Dre did a LOT right...I wouldn't even want to compare Snoop's Dogghouse/Doggystyle or the labels that many other artists have started to Aftermath, and he has arguably had one of the three most dominant record labels in history. I just spoke to say that he could have possibly surpassed Def Jam and that the label had potential to be even stronger than it is...and personally, a lot of the artists he's signed have been very questionable to me.

I do feel that their reign has been much longer than Death Rows, even if no 3-4 year period can touch the 3-4 amazing years Death Row had at on point, and it's much stronger than Ruthless with no question....so I wouldn't even spend time comparing it to those. I compared it most to Def Jam, because they are like the landmark label in Hip Hop that set the most standards and is still a major powerhouse.


Jimmy H.

Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #68 on: September 09, 2008, 10:00:24 PM »

I think my post can be seen as being a knock at Dre, possibly because the tone sounds negative...when I was really just speaking on how I feel Aftermath could have been even more successful than it already has been.

Of course, Dre did a LOT right...I wouldn't even want to compare Snoop's Dogghouse/Doggystyle or the labels that many other artists have started to Aftermath, and he has arguably had one of the three most dominant record labels in history. I just spoke to say that he could have possibly surpassed Def Jam and that the label had potential to be even stronger than it is...and personally, a lot of the artists he's signed have been very questionable to me.

I do feel that their reign has been much longer than Death Rows, even if no 3-4 year period can touch the 3-4 amazing years Death Row had at on point, and it's much stronger than Ruthless with no question....so I wouldn't even spend time comparing it to those. I compared it most to Def Jam, because they are like the landmark label in Hip Hop that set the most standards and is still a major powerhouse.


[/quote]


Aftermath could never had been Def Jam. To be honest, I think it's bigger than it probably ever should have been. Dre is at his core an artist/producer. Not a CEO or businessman. There is no Dame Dash to his Jay or Irv Gotti to his Ja. For any new artist to break over there, there is a huge level of Dre involvement expected from the fan base. He's counted on to produce the music and deal with Jimmy at the same time. When you look at the fact that Dre doesn't cling to the spotlight like the other label bosses, it actually makes what he's done that more impressive.
 

Chad Vader

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #69 on: September 15, 2008, 10:54:34 PM »
Aftermath statistics...
20 artists have officially been signed to Aftermath in the last 10 years. Out of those 20,only 6 have released an album under Aftermath.

Hittman - 10 guest appearances on "2001", wrote Dre's verse on "The Next Episode"
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 0

Rakim - guest appeared on Truth Hurts "Addictive" & Jay-Z's "The Watcher 2"
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 0 ( "Oh My God" shelved )

Antonio
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Truth Hurts - had a top 10 hit with "Addictive", released her debut album on Aftermath
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 1 ( later pulled off shelves due to lawsuit over "Addictive" )

Shaunta - appeared on "The Wash" & "8 Mile" soundtracks
Years Signed - 2
Albums Released - 0

Joe Beast - appeared on "The Wash" & "8 Mile" soundtracks
Years Signed - 2
Albums Released - 0

Brooklyn - appeared on 50 Cent's "In Da Hood"
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

The Game - first signed to Aftermath in, later co-signed with G-Unit and dropped
"The Documentary"
Years Signed - 4
Albums Released - 1

G.A.G.E.
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Joell Ortiz
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Dion - originally Hi-Tek's protege, appeared on Game's "Documentary" & 50's "Massacre"
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Tiffany Villarreal
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Eve - Dre produced on 2 of her non-Aftermath albums, featured on Mary J Blige's "Not Today" and Gwen Stefani's "Rich Girl"
Years Signed - 4
Albums Released - 0 ( "Here I Am" shelved )

Busta Rhymes - signed in 2004, dropped one album and scheduled to drop follow up before leaving the label.
Years Signed - 4
Albums Released - 1 ( "Blessed" shelved )

Stat Quo - guest appeared on Eminem's "Encore",
Young Buck's "Straight Outta Cashville" and the Re-Up album. Dropped "Like Dat" as a buzz single,
later planned on releasing "Get Low" as a single before dropping "Here We Go". Statlanta pushed back 328 times.
Years Signed - 5
Albums Released - 0 ( "Statlanta" shelved )

Marsha Ambrosius - guest spots on Game's "Documentary" and Busta's "Big Bang"
Years Signed - 2
Albums Released - 0

Bishop Lamont - dropped "Grow Up" as the offical single off his debut, "The Reformation"
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 0 ( "The Reformation" pending... )

50 Cent - released 3 albums on Shady\Aftermath
Years Signed - 5
Albums Released - 3 ( "Before I Self Destruct" pending... )

Eminem - released 4 studio albums on Aftermath, 5 including "Curtain Call: The Hits"
Years Signed - 10
Albums Released - 5 ( "King Mathers" pending... )

Dr. Dre - founder, CEO of Aftermath Entertainment, dropped "2001" 9 years ago
Years Signed - 12
Albums Released 1 ( "Look out for Detox" )

Stat Quo is pretty much finished, and there's word Bishop is as well. That label is on some voodoo shit.
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #70 on: October 29, 2008, 10:03:08 PM »
its still hard to understand why the album was never released by Aftermath.
There are SOME weak joints but the album as a whole is bangin'.

I can understand why they choose not to release it before the label blew up but they f**ked themselves
BY GOING AFTER ONLY THE BIG SELLERS.
I might be no business man but releasing T and Hitt
WOULD HAVE KEPT THE LABEL'S CREDIBILITY ALIVE WHICH IN LONG TERM MAINTAINS SALES.
They would NOT have sold like 50 and Em but it would have allowed the label to SURVIVE ON TWO LEVELS with GOOD music and the BIG sales provided by Em and 50. Can't fault them for just chasing paper but all these G-Unit and Shady affiliations and wak albums has made Aftermath a bit of a joke.


You got some good points,they need some credibility artists/albums not only big sellers that the streets don't respect. Bishop and Detox might restore some much needed credibility back to label.
I blame Jimmy for fuckin' up the label.




At least both King T and Hittman leaked,so we the die hard fans can enjoy them. It's Aftermath's loss.
 

Chad Vader

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #71 on: September 04, 2009, 03:23:49 AM »

-That they signed and dropped/let go a whole gang of artists,song writers and producers.
-Having the biggest vault of unreleased music.
 

Okka

Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #72 on: September 04, 2009, 06:38:26 AM »
Well compared to how many people were signed to Death Row Records and never put out an album or even songs, it's not that bad.
<a href="http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?</a>
 

GSmith

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Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #73 on: September 04, 2009, 10:23:43 AM »
Aftermath statistics...
20 artists have officially been signed to Aftermath in the last 10 years. Out of those 20,only 6 have released an album under Aftermath.

Hittman - 10 guest appearances on "2001", wrote Dre's verse on "The Next Episode"
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 0

Rakim - guest appeared on Truth Hurts "Addictive" & Jay-Z's "The Watcher 2"
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 0 ( "Oh My God" shelved )

Antonio
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Truth Hurts - had a top 10 hit with "Addictive", released her debut album on Aftermath
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 1 ( later pulled off shelves due to lawsuit over "Addictive" )

Shaunta - appeared on "The Wash" & "8 Mile" soundtracks
Years Signed - 2
Albums Released - 0

Joe Beast - appeared on "The Wash" & "8 Mile" soundtracks
Years Signed - 2
Albums Released - 0

Brooklyn - appeared on 50 Cent's "In Da Hood"
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

The Game - first signed to Aftermath in, later co-signed with G-Unit and dropped
"The Documentary"
Years Signed - 4
Albums Released - 1

G.A.G.E.
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Joell Ortiz
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Dion - originally Hi-Tek's protege, appeared on Game's "Documentary" & 50's "Massacre"
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Tiffany Villarreal
Years Signed - 1
Albums Released - 0

Eve - Dre produced on 2 of her non-Aftermath albums, featured on Mary J Blige's "Not Today" and Gwen Stefani's "Rich Girl"
Years Signed - 4
Albums Released - 0 ( "Here I Am" shelved )

Busta Rhymes - signed in 2004, dropped one album and scheduled to drop follow up before leaving the label.
Years Signed - 4
Albums Released - 1 ( "Blessed" shelved )

Stat Quo - guest appeared on Eminem's "Encore",
Young Buck's "Straight Outta Cashville" and the Re-Up album. Dropped "Like Dat" as a buzz single,
later planned on releasing "Get Low" as a single before dropping "Here We Go". Statlanta pushed back 328 times.
Years Signed - 5
Albums Released - 0 ( "Statlanta" shelved )

Marsha Ambrosius - guest spots on Game's "Documentary" and Busta's "Big Bang"
Years Signed - 2
Albums Released - 0

Bishop Lamont - dropped "Grow Up" as the offical single off his debut, "The Reformation"
Years Signed - 3
Albums Released - 0 ( "The Reformation" pending... )

50 Cent - released 3 albums on Shady\Aftermath
Years Signed - 5
Albums Released - 3 ( "Before I Self Destruct" pending... )

Eminem - released 4 studio albums on Aftermath, 5 including "Curtain Call: The Hits"
Years Signed - 10
Albums Released - 5 ( "King Mathers" pending... )

Dr. Dre - founder, CEO of Aftermath Entertainment, dropped "2001" 9 years ago
Years Signed - 12
Albums Released 1 ( "Look out for Detox" )

Stat Quo is pretty much finished, and there's word Bishop is as well. That label is on some voodoo shit.

Does anyone know of any songs from "Antonio" "Joe Beast" "Brooklyn" "G.A.G.E." 0r "Joell Ortiz" that are produce by Dre or do they have any mixtapes?

Okka

Re: What will be Aftermath's legacy?
« Reply #74 on: September 04, 2009, 11:18:43 AM »
Joe Beast had that "Gangsta" joint with the Snoop Dogg sample in it, the beat was dope as hell. I think it was produced by Dr. Dre & Mel-Man, and i think originally the beat for 50 Cent's "In Da Hood" was supposed to be for him. I remember somebody posted the song here but i never downloaded it or even heard it.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 11:20:27 AM by Okka »
<a href="http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?</a>