Author Topic: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ  (Read 528 times)

Dre-Day

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2009, 06:16:49 AM »
i don't get how anyone would not like malice in wonderland, while liking this at the same time.
it's the same formula, tits & ass


If you have some women in your life you can dig those songs. If you on the internet 24/7 bullying people and acting tough you hate it yes
that's a dumb ass statement, but at the same time, i can't expect you to put consciousness in your comments

You live for this karma shit huh? Grow up man
lol, you stepped to me, don't start crying now

Yes I did because your music taste is that bad. But you like to give people bad karma huh? haha how old are you?
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karma
 
Dictionary: kar·ma   (kär'mə) pronunciation
 
Home > Library > Literature & Language > Dictionary

n.

   1. Hinduism & Buddhism. The total effect of a person's actions and conduct during the successive phases of the person's existence, regarded as determining the person's destiny.
   2. Fate; destiny.
   3. Informal. A distinctive aura, atmosphere, or feeling: There's bad karma around the house today.

[Sanskrit, deed, action that has consequences, karma.]
karmic kar'mic (-mĭk) adj.

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Wordsmith Words: karma
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Home > Library > Literature & Language > Wordsmith Words

(KAHR-ma)

noun
1. In the Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain religions, a person's action (bad or good) that determines his or her destiny.
2. Destiny; fate.
3. An aura or atmosphere generated by someone or something.

Etymology
From Sanskrit karma (deed, work). The word Sanskrit comes from the same Indo-European root.
Usage
"Is Edwards messing with the Jets' karma, jeopardizing their already-slim playoff chances ..." — Rich Simini; Simms OK With Jet QB Juggle; New York Daily News; Oct 22, 2003.

"In his introduction to the new service last week, Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs said those who give up their illegal download habit and use iTunes will be rewarded with `good karma,' as they are supporting artists." — Katie Dean; PC User Whistles a Happy ITunes; Wired News; Oct 21, 2003.

 
Britannica Concise Encyclopedia: karma
Top
Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Britannica Concise Encyclopedia

In Indian philosophy, the influence of an individual's past actions on his future lives or reincarnations. It is based on the conviction that the present life is only one in a chain of lives (see samsara). The accumulated moral energy of a person's life determines his or her character, class status, and disposition in the next life. The process is automatic, and no interference by the gods is possible. In the course of a chain of lives, people can perfect themselves and reach the level of Brahma, or they can degrade themselves to the extent that they return to life as animals. The concept of karma, basic to Hinduism, was also incorporated into Buddhism and Jainism.

For more information on karma, visit Britannica.com.
 
The Religion Book: Karma
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Religion

In both Hinduism and Buddhism, every action has consequences. When a pebble falls into a pool, it produces rings that spread throughout the whole pool. A butterfly fluttering its wings can produce a typhoon, under the right conditions.

In the same way, our actions cause cosmic vibrations that affect not only this life but our lives to come. What we do not learn in this life must be learned in the next. Harm we cause in this life will come back to us in the next. The universe is relentless. It will not let us get away with anything.

At the same time, good things we do affect future lives as well. It is said that when the Buddha had his great moment of insight, he saw how all his past lives had prepared him for that moment. He understood how they were connected. All at once, he understood the great force of karma at work, propelling him to come to understand the Middle Way of the Four Noble Truths (See Buddhism). With this realization, karma had done its work. He was now complete.

And that, according to the teachings, is what karma does. It makes us complete, driving us forever, if need be, until we come to understand what we are. And with that understanding, we also come to know who we are. In this grand scheme of things, it is not that we wrestle with God. It is that God wrestles with us and says, in reverse of the words of Genesis 32, "I will not let you go until I bless you!"

Sources: Hagen, Steve. Buddhism Plain and Simple. Boston: Charles E. Tuttle Co., 1997.
 
Philosophy Dictionary: karma
Top
Home > Library > History, Politics & Society > Philosophy Dictionary

(Sanskrit, deed) In Hindu and Buddhist philosophy, the universal law of cause and effect, as applied to the deeds of people. A (deliberate) good or bad deed leads a person's destiny in the appropriate direction. The ripening of the deed may take more than one lifetime, tying the agent to the cycle of rebirth, or samsara; only deeds free from desire and delusion have no consequences for karma.
 
Buddhism Dictionary: karma
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Buddhism Dictionary

(Sanskrit; Pāli, kamma, action). The doctrine of karma states the implications for ethics of the basic universal law of Dharma, one aspect of which is that freely chosen and intended moral acts inevitably entail consequences (Pāli, kamma-niyama). It is impossible to escape these consequences and no one, not even the Buddha, has the power to forgive evil deeds and short-circuit the consequences which inevitably follow. A wrongful thought, word, or deed is one which is committed under the influence of the three roots of evil (akuśala-mūla), while good deeds stem from the opposites of these, namely the three ‘virtuous roots’ (kuśala-mūla). These good or evil roots nourished over the course of many lives become ingrained dispositions which predispose the individual towards virtue or vice. Wrongful actions are designated in various ways as evil (pāpa), unwholesome (akuśala), demeritorious (apuṇya), or corrupt (saṃkliṣṭa), and such deeds lead inevitably to a deeper entanglement in the process of suffering and rebirth (saṃsāra). Karma determines in which of the six realms of rebirth one is reborn, and affects the nature and quality of individual circumstances (for example, physical appearance, health, and prosperity). According to Buddhist thought the involvement of the individual in saṃsāra is not the result of a ‘Fall’, or due to ‘original sin’ through which human nature became flawed. Each person, accordingly, has the final responsibility for his own salvation and the power of free will with which to choose good or evil.
 
Asian Mythology: Karman
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Asian Mythology

For Hindus (see Hinduism) and Jains (see Jainism), karman (karma is the nominative Sanskrit form) originally referred to proper ritual actions, but the term has come to denote past actions that will affect what happens to a person in various hells or paradises after death and in the individual's particular rebirth or reincarnation. Literally, what one is now is the result of what one did in the past and what one is now contains seeds for the future. According to the Law of Karman, life is a series of deaths and rebirths determined by one's past actions. To achieve true liberation from the cycle of life (see Saṃsāra), one must theoretically achieve total nonaction, total negation of karman.

Buddhists (see Buddhism) also consider that a person's situation is determined by his or her karman, and that good karman can in some ways eliminate the results of bad karman.
 
Columbia Encyclopedia: karma
Top
Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Columbia Encyclopedia
karma or karman (kär'mə, kär'mən), [Skt.,=action, work, or ritual], basic concept common to Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. The doctrine of karma states that one's state in this life is a result of actions (both physical and mental) in past incarnations, and action in this life can determine one's destiny in future incarnations. Karma is a natural, impersonal law of moral cause and effect and has no connection with the idea of a supreme power that decrees punishment or forgiveness of sins. Karmic law is universally applicable, and only those who have attained liberation from rebirth, called mukti (or moksha) or nirvana, can transcend it. Karma yoga (see yoga), the spiritual discipline of detachment from the results of action, is a famous teaching of the Bhagavad-Gita.

 
Occultism & Parapsychology Encyclopedia: Karma
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Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Occultism & Parapsychology Encyclopedia

A doctrine common to Hinduism, Buddhism, and Theosophy, although not wholly adopted by Theosophists as taught in the other two religions. The word karma itself means "action," but implies both action and reaction. All actions have consequences, some immediate, some delayed, others in future incarnations, according to Eastern beliefs. Thus individuals bear responsibility for all their actions and cannot escape the consequences, although bad actions can be expiated by good ones.

Action is not homogeneous, but on the contrary contains three elements: the thought, which conceives the action; the will, which finds the means of accomplishment; and the union of thought and will, which brings the action to fruition. It is plain, therefore, that thought has potential for good or evil, for as the thought is, so will the action be. The miser, thinking of avarice, is avaricious; the libertine, thinking of vice, is vicious; and, conversely, one thinking of virtuous thoughts shows virtue in his or her actions.

There is also a viewpoint which believes that karma comes not from the action itself, but the beliefs and feelings which motivate or allow the action. "The law of karma is not a justice and retribution system, so anyone who has had much suffering in this life is not a victim of 'bad karma,' but simply finds themselves in predicaments that are simply the result of their own beliefs about themselves."

Arising from such teaching is the attention devoted to thought power. Using the analogy of the physical body, which can be developed by regimen and training based on natural scientific laws, Theosophists teach that character, in a similar way, can be scientifically built up by exercising the mind.

Every vice is considered evidence of lack of a corresponding virtue—avarice, for instance, shows the absence of generosity. Instead of accepting that an individual is naturally avaricious, Theosophists teach that constant thought focused on generosity will in time change the individual's nature in that respect. The length of time necessary for change depends on at least two factors: the strength of thought and the strength of the vice; the vice may be the sum of the indulgence of many ages and therefore difficult to eradicate.

The doctrine of karma, therefore, must be considered not in relation to one life only, but with an understanding of reincarnation. In traditional Hinduism individuals were seen as immersed in a world of illusion, called maya. In this world, distracted from the real world of spirit, one performs acts, and those actions create karma—consequences. In traditional teaching the goal of life was to escape karma. There was little difference between good and bad karma. Karma kept one trapped in the world of illusion.

During the nineteenth century, Western notions of evolution of life and the moral order were influenced by Indian teachings. Some began to place significance upon good karma as a means of overcoming bad karma. The goal gradually became the gaining of good karma, rather than escape. Such an approach to reincarnation and karma became popular in Theosophy and Spiritism, a form of Spiritualism.

Western scholars have often mistakenly viewed karma and fate as the same concept. Fate, however, is the belief that the path of one's life is established by agencies outside oneself. Karma is the opposite, implying the ability to alter one's path of life—in a future life if not the present—by altering one's feelings and beliefs, and by engaging in positive practices. "It is the coward and the fool who says this is fate," goes the Sanskrit proverb. "But it is the strong man who stands up and says, "I will make my fate."

According to this view, reincarnation is carried on under the laws of karma and evolution. The newborn baby bears within it the seeds of former lives. His or her character is the same as it was in past existences, and so it will continue unless the individual changes it, which he or she has the power to do. Each succeeding existence finds that character stronger in one direction or another. If it is evil the effort to change it becomes increasingly difficult; indeed a complete change may not be possible until many lifetimes of effort have passed. In cases such as these, temptation may be too strong to resist, yet the individual who has knowledge of the workings of karma will yield to evil only after a desperate struggle; thus, instead of increasing the power of the evil, he helps to destroy its potency. Only in the most rare cases can an individual free himself with a single effort.

The karmic goal in reincarnation, however, is said not necessarily to raise the soul to a higher plain of existence, but entreat enlightenment to reign at whichever level of existence the soul happens to find itself. "Many…see the process of enlightenment as "ascension"; it is in fact more true to say that it is a process of descension, that is bringing the light down to all levels."

Portugoal

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #16 on: December 16, 2009, 06:19:21 AM »
i don't get how anyone would not like malice in wonderland, while liking this at the same time.
it's the same formula, tits & ass


If you have some women in your life you can dig those songs. If you on the internet 24/7 bullying people and acting tough you hate it yes
that's a dumb ass statement, but at the same time, i can't expect you to put consciousness in your comments

Fuck 1981. He has no conscious. He knows how sensitive the subject 'women' is for you and yet he has to make a comment about you not having a girl.
 

Dre-Day

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2009, 06:20:29 AM »
i don't get how anyone would not like malice in wonderland, while liking this at the same time.
it's the same formula, tits & ass


If you have some women in your life you can dig those songs. If you on the internet 24/7 bullying people and acting tough you hate it yes
that's a dumb ass statement, but at the same time, i can't expect you to put consciousness in your comments

Fuck 1981. He has no conscious. He knows how sensitive the subject 'women' is for you and yet he has to make a comment about you not having a girl.
i guess, that's why you posted :laugh:

1981

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2009, 06:20:50 AM »
i don't get how anyone would not like malice in wonderland, while liking this at the same time.
it's the same formula, tits & ass


If you have some women in your life you can dig those songs. If you on the internet 24/7 bullying people and acting tough you hate it yes
that's a dumb ass statement, but at the same time, i can't expect you to put consciousness in your comments

You live for this karma shit huh? Grow up man
lol, you stepped to me, don't start crying now

Yes I did because your music taste is that bad. But you like to give people bad karma huh? haha how old are you?
Answers.com
karma
 
Dictionary: kar·ma   (kär'mə) pronunciation
 
Home > Library > Literature & Language > Dictionary

n.

   1. Hinduism & Buddhism. The total effect of a person's actions and conduct during the successive phases of the person's existence, regarded as determining the person's destiny.
   2. Fate; destiny.
   3. Informal. A distinctive aura, atmosphere, or feeling: There's bad karma around the house today.

[Sanskrit, deed, action that has consequences, karma.]
karmic kar'mic (-mĭk) adj.

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English▼ Deutsch Español Français Italiano Tagalog

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Wordsmith Words: karma
Top
Home > Library > Literature & Language > Wordsmith Words

(KAHR-ma)

noun
1. In the Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain religions, a person's action (bad or good) that determines his or her destiny.
2. Destiny; fate.
3. An aura or atmosphere generated by someone or something.

Etymology
From Sanskrit karma (deed, work). The word Sanskrit comes from the same Indo-European root.
Usage
"Is Edwards messing with the Jets' karma, jeopardizing their already-slim playoff chances ..." — Rich Simini; Simms OK With Jet QB Juggle; New York Daily News; Oct 22, 2003.

"In his introduction to the new service last week, Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs said those who give up their illegal download habit and use iTunes will be rewarded with `good karma,' as they are supporting artists." — Katie Dean; PC User Whistles a Happy ITunes; Wired News; Oct 21, 2003.

 
Britannica Concise Encyclopedia: karma
Top
Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Britannica Concise Encyclopedia

In Indian philosophy, the influence of an individual's past actions on his future lives or reincarnations. It is based on the conviction that the present life is only one in a chain of lives (see samsara). The accumulated moral energy of a person's life determines his or her character, class status, and disposition in the next life. The process is automatic, and no interference by the gods is possible. In the course of a chain of lives, people can perfect themselves and reach the level of Brahma, or they can degrade themselves to the extent that they return to life as animals. The concept of karma, basic to Hinduism, was also incorporated into Buddhism and Jainism.

For more information on karma, visit Britannica.com.
 
The Religion Book: Karma
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Religion

In both Hinduism and Buddhism, every action has consequences. When a pebble falls into a pool, it produces rings that spread throughout the whole pool. A butterfly fluttering its wings can produce a typhoon, under the right conditions.

In the same way, our actions cause cosmic vibrations that affect not only this life but our lives to come. What we do not learn in this life must be learned in the next. Harm we cause in this life will come back to us in the next. The universe is relentless. It will not let us get away with anything.

At the same time, good things we do affect future lives as well. It is said that when the Buddha had his great moment of insight, he saw how all his past lives had prepared him for that moment. He understood how they were connected. All at once, he understood the great force of karma at work, propelling him to come to understand the Middle Way of the Four Noble Truths (See Buddhism). With this realization, karma had done its work. He was now complete.

And that, according to the teachings, is what karma does. It makes us complete, driving us forever, if need be, until we come to understand what we are. And with that understanding, we also come to know who we are. In this grand scheme of things, it is not that we wrestle with God. It is that God wrestles with us and says, in reverse of the words of Genesis 32, "I will not let you go until I bless you!"

Sources: Hagen, Steve. Buddhism Plain and Simple. Boston: Charles E. Tuttle Co., 1997.
 
Philosophy Dictionary: karma
Top
Home > Library > History, Politics & Society > Philosophy Dictionary

(Sanskrit, deed) In Hindu and Buddhist philosophy, the universal law of cause and effect, as applied to the deeds of people. A (deliberate) good or bad deed leads a person's destiny in the appropriate direction. The ripening of the deed may take more than one lifetime, tying the agent to the cycle of rebirth, or samsara; only deeds free from desire and delusion have no consequences for karma.
 
Buddhism Dictionary: karma
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Buddhism Dictionary

(Sanskrit; Pāli, kamma, action). The doctrine of karma states the implications for ethics of the basic universal law of Dharma, one aspect of which is that freely chosen and intended moral acts inevitably entail consequences (Pāli, kamma-niyama). It is impossible to escape these consequences and no one, not even the Buddha, has the power to forgive evil deeds and short-circuit the consequences which inevitably follow. A wrongful thought, word, or deed is one which is committed under the influence of the three roots of evil (akuśala-mūla), while good deeds stem from the opposites of these, namely the three ‘virtuous roots’ (kuśala-mūla). These good or evil roots nourished over the course of many lives become ingrained dispositions which predispose the individual towards virtue or vice. Wrongful actions are designated in various ways as evil (pāpa), unwholesome (akuśala), demeritorious (apuṇya), or corrupt (saṃkliṣṭa), and such deeds lead inevitably to a deeper entanglement in the process of suffering and rebirth (saṃsāra). Karma determines in which of the six realms of rebirth one is reborn, and affects the nature and quality of individual circumstances (for example, physical appearance, health, and prosperity). According to Buddhist thought the involvement of the individual in saṃsāra is not the result of a ‘Fall’, or due to ‘original sin’ through which human nature became flawed. Each person, accordingly, has the final responsibility for his own salvation and the power of free will with which to choose good or evil.
 
Asian Mythology: Karman
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Asian Mythology

For Hindus (see Hinduism) and Jains (see Jainism), karman (karma is the nominative Sanskrit form) originally referred to proper ritual actions, but the term has come to denote past actions that will affect what happens to a person in various hells or paradises after death and in the individual's particular rebirth or reincarnation. Literally, what one is now is the result of what one did in the past and what one is now contains seeds for the future. According to the Law of Karman, life is a series of deaths and rebirths determined by one's past actions. To achieve true liberation from the cycle of life (see Saṃsāra), one must theoretically achieve total nonaction, total negation of karman.

Buddhists (see Buddhism) also consider that a person's situation is determined by his or her karman, and that good karman can in some ways eliminate the results of bad karman.
 
Columbia Encyclopedia: karma
Top
Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Columbia Encyclopedia
karma or karman (kär'mə, kär'mən), [Skt.,=action, work, or ritual], basic concept common to Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. The doctrine of karma states that one's state in this life is a result of actions (both physical and mental) in past incarnations, and action in this life can determine one's destiny in future incarnations. Karma is a natural, impersonal law of moral cause and effect and has no connection with the idea of a supreme power that decrees punishment or forgiveness of sins. Karmic law is universally applicable, and only those who have attained liberation from rebirth, called mukti (or moksha) or nirvana, can transcend it. Karma yoga (see yoga), the spiritual discipline of detachment from the results of action, is a famous teaching of the Bhagavad-Gita.

 
Occultism & Parapsychology Encyclopedia: Karma
Top
Home > Library > Religion & Spirituality > Occultism & Parapsychology Encyclopedia

A doctrine common to Hinduism, Buddhism, and Theosophy, although not wholly adopted by Theosophists as taught in the other two religions. The word karma itself means "action," but implies both action and reaction. All actions have consequences, some immediate, some delayed, others in future incarnations, according to Eastern beliefs. Thus individuals bear responsibility for all their actions and cannot escape the consequences, although bad actions can be expiated by good ones.

Action is not homogeneous, but on the contrary contains three elements: the thought, which conceives the action; the will, which finds the means of accomplishment; and the union of thought and will, which brings the action to fruition. It is plain, therefore, that thought has potential for good or evil, for as the thought is, so will the action be. The miser, thinking of avarice, is avaricious; the libertine, thinking of vice, is vicious; and, conversely, one thinking of virtuous thoughts shows virtue in his or her actions.

There is also a viewpoint which believes that karma comes not from the action itself, but the beliefs and feelings which motivate or allow the action. "The law of karma is not a justice and retribution system, so anyone who has had much suffering in this life is not a victim of 'bad karma,' but simply finds themselves in predicaments that are simply the result of their own beliefs about themselves."

Arising from such teaching is the attention devoted to thought power. Using the analogy of the physical body, which can be developed by regimen and training based on natural scientific laws, Theosophists teach that character, in a similar way, can be scientifically built up by exercising the mind.

Every vice is considered evidence of lack of a corresponding virtue—avarice, for instance, shows the absence of generosity. Instead of accepting that an individual is naturally avaricious, Theosophists teach that constant thought focused on generosity will in time change the individual's nature in that respect. The length of time necessary for change depends on at least two factors: the strength of thought and the strength of the vice; the vice may be the sum of the indulgence of many ages and therefore difficult to eradicate.

The doctrine of karma, therefore, must be considered not in relation to one life only, but with an understanding of reincarnation. In traditional Hinduism individuals were seen as immersed in a world of illusion, called maya. In this world, distracted from the real world of spirit, one performs acts, and those actions create karma—consequences. In traditional teaching the goal of life was to escape karma. There was little difference between good and bad karma. Karma kept one trapped in the world of illusion.

During the nineteenth century, Western notions of evolution of life and the moral order were influenced by Indian teachings. Some began to place significance upon good karma as a means of overcoming bad karma. The goal gradually became the gaining of good karma, rather than escape. Such an approach to reincarnation and karma became popular in Theosophy and Spiritism, a form of Spiritualism.

Western scholars have often mistakenly viewed karma and fate as the same concept. Fate, however, is the belief that the path of one's life is established by agencies outside oneself. Karma is the opposite, implying the ability to alter one's path of life—in a future life if not the present—by altering one's feelings and beliefs, and by engaging in positive practices. "It is the coward and the fool who says this is fate," goes the Sanskrit proverb. "But it is the strong man who stands up and says, "I will make my fate."

According to this view, reincarnation is carried on under the laws of karma and evolution. The newborn baby bears within it the seeds of former lives. His or her character is the same as it was in past existences, and so it will continue unless the individual changes it, which he or she has the power to do. Each succeeding existence finds that character stronger in one direction or another. If it is evil the effort to change it becomes increasingly difficult; indeed a complete change may not be possible until many lifetimes of effort have passed. In cases such as these, temptation may be too strong to resist, yet the individual who has knowledge of the workings of karma will yield to evil only after a desperate struggle; thus, instead of increasing the power of the evil, he helps to destroy its potency. Only in the most rare cases can an individual free himself with a single effort.

The karmic goal in reincarnation, however, is said not necessarily to raise the soul to a higher plain of existence, but entreat enlightenment to reign at whichever level of existence the soul happens to find itself. "Many…see the process of enlightenment as "ascension"; it is in fact more true to say that it is a process of descension, that is bringing the light down to all levels."

You really have no life. But we all knew that.
 

Portugoal

  • Guest
Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #19 on: December 16, 2009, 06:23:46 AM »
The song's good by the way. Not outstanding, but it's a chill song to play in your car or on your bike.
 

1981

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2009, 06:25:03 AM »
The song's good by the way. Not outstanding, but it's a chill song to play in your car or on your bike.

Yes it is... It has a great vibe
 

Dre-Day

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2009, 06:25:37 AM »
You really have no life. But we all knew that.

well you're falling short then, since you're talking shit to this lowlife :laugh:

s_dadry

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Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2009, 11:15:15 AM »
Dope!!!
 

OG Snoopaveli

Re: [AUDIO] Snoop Dogg - Bootiez Automatic (iTunes Bonus) CDQ/No DJ
« Reply #23 on: December 16, 2009, 12:02:51 PM »
thanks Woof 4 this no dj version!
i like it!   8)