Author Topic: HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes (Documentary)  (Read 620 times)

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Re: HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes (Documentary)
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2013, 02:44:40 PM »
But yeah, great documentary on how Hip-Hop has been subverted by the power structure.

And the role of consumers and artists when they subdue to that power structure and act accordingly.

Yeah.. blame the corporate machine but when artists go independent the quality of music almost always gets worse.  I have many examples of this...

Xzibit - His 3 classic albums all came when he was signed to the major.

Mos Def-  After Rawkus records folded Mos went independent and all his albums since have failed to make an impression

Talib Kweli-  Same as Mos Def

Canibus-  His first two albums with Universal were fucking sick!!!  Then he lost his deal and started manufacturing "stan" beef with Eminem and his career fell so hard he joined the military.

Daz Dillinger-   Everything Daz did over at Death Row was fire.  From his first verse he did on the Chronic to his last solo with Revenge Retaliation and Get Back this dude was a legend... then he went independent and faded out from there.

Kurupt-  Everything he did at Death Row was fire, and although his first solo wasn't great, his second and third solo's were dope... but since going independent this dude is said to have fallen off worse than any other West Coast artist.

Ice Cube-  Used to always put out quality records on majors and now I never even bothered checking out his independent releases.

...I could go on forever 
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Eminem will be bigger than Michael Jackson as long as he doesn't change."

-Dre, Rolling Stones mag 1999 Em cover

********
 

M Dogg™

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Re: HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes (Documentary)
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2013, 06:03:01 PM »
Except Immortal Technique.
 

Fraxxx

Re: HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes (Documentary)
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2013, 02:29:56 AM »
But yeah, great documentary on how Hip-Hop has been subverted by the power structure.

And the role of consumers and artists when they subdue to that power structure and act accordingly.

Yeah.. blame the corporate machine but when artists go independent the quality of music almost always gets worse.  I have many examples of this...

Xzibit - His 3 classic albums all came when he was signed to the major.

Mos Def-  After Rawkus records folded Mos went independent and all his albums since have failed to make an impression

Talib Kweli-  Same as Mos Def

Canibus-  His first two albums with Universal were fucking sick!!!  Then he lost his deal and started manufacturing "stan" beef with Eminem and his career fell so hard he joined the military.

Daz Dillinger-   Everything Daz did over at Death Row was fire.  From his first verse he did on the Chronic to his last solo with Revenge Retaliation and Get Back this dude was a legend... then he went independent and faded out from there.

Kurupt-  Everything he did at Death Row was fire, and although his first solo wasn't great, his second and third solo's were dope... but since going independent this dude is said to have fallen off worse than any other West Coast artist.

Ice Cube-  Used to always put out quality records on majors and now I never even bothered checking out his independent releases.

...I could go on forever 

It's not about the quality of production which a big company definitely can provide but about the missing diversity in content which the companies can dictate through the existing structures. Upcoming artists must have created a huge buzz for themselves before they are backed by a big label to put out an album which is different only cuz it'll make them lots of money anyway. How many rappers are there that accomplished that in the last couple of years?
i don´t need any medicate shit im 100 normal.
 

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Re: HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes (Documentary)
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2013, 01:17:29 PM »


It's not about the quality of production which a big company definitely can provide but about the missing diversity in content which the companies can dictate through the existing structures. Upcoming artists must have created a huge buzz for themselves before they are backed by a big label to put out an album which is different only cuz it'll make them lots of money anyway. How many rappers are there that accomplished that in the last couple of years?

not a bad point but isn't that more of a problem with radio stations, video stations, club music?
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Eminem will be bigger than Michael Jackson as long as he doesn't change."

-Dre, Rolling Stones mag 1999 Em cover

********
 

Sami

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Re: HIP-HOP: Beyond Beats and Rhymes (Documentary)
« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2013, 02:18:39 PM »
No. It's a problem that the radio/TV/internet monopolies manipulate the music for their own benefit, as the movie explained.

Media consolidation is the problem.