Author Topic: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation  (Read 468 times)

M Dogg™

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This was posted on Facebook by the OG TimeLock:

Hello, After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.

Between the late 80's and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

Thank you

Posted by Ivan: @hiphopisread.com http://www.hiphopisread.com/2012/04/secret-meeting-that-changed-rap-music.html
 

J. B A N A N A S

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2013, 06:02:53 PM »
Has this not been shared on dubcc yet? Man I read this on reddit last year and thought it was such a great conspiracy story, would make an excellent movie. I love this story.
 

DJ SUGAFREE QUIK

Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2013, 09:29:54 PM »
Yes this was posted b4.  I 4got about it, & sometimes in life you just gotta put 2 & 2 2gether.  Why do some of the same things in life keep happening & keep not happening  ???  Some of the things going on in rap, what dude said be seeming that way. 
 

J. B A N A N A S

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2013, 02:19:14 PM »
So would we all share responsibility for keeping black people down by listening to rap?

What about the casualties from white America? The Caucasians who grew up listening to rap and molded their characteristics around the ones they saw in their favorite rappers? Did the conspirators anticipate such widespread wiggerdom?
 

Sami

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2013, 02:41:27 PM »
Exactly. They want and encourage wiggerdom.

We're all black people now according to the way the super-rich view the world.
 

J. B A N A N A S

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2013, 02:54:52 PM »
Exactly. They want and encourage wiggerdom.

We're all black people now according to the way the super-rich view the world.

That's interesting. Not only was it a way to keep Blacks as a permanent underclass, but an effective tool in siphoning off middle class youth as well, widening the economic gap and placing more power and money in to the super rich's hands.

Encourage those who are more susceptible to the propaganda in to putting more emphasis on immediate gratification and consumerism.

Monkey A buys drugs and expensive clothes then raps about it to a trendy instrumental - Monkey B, C and D buy drugs and expensive clothes instead of saving money.
 

virtuoso

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2013, 03:10:16 PM »

They are devious devils, extremely intelligent, but their behaviour can only be likened to devilish, they are destructive sick psycopaths. You raise a good point there, monkey see, monkey do once a trend is set others will want to follow so that they too can hope to emulate and that's all it is, hope built on fresh air, an illusion of wealth. We know that a lot of these rappers wealth is just a mirage, and sadly people buy into that image.
 

M Dogg™

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2013, 09:53:37 PM »
http://www.infowars.com/private-prisons-the-more-americans-they-put-behind-bars-the-more-money-they-make/

This didn't surprise me when I read it, as I have lived the experience of the prison industrial complex and now I am learning the actual statistics and reasons for it. This system is set up to make money off of people, and it turns out the war on drugs is the biggest feeder to the prison system. So many people of color, Latinos and blacks, are being put in jail for non-violent crimes and they are then set up in a system of no return. Once you get felon on your record, you have no job prospects anymore. It's been proven Latinos and black are already at a disadvantage when it comes to work prospects, so the system is set up for people to keep coming back.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57485392/ap-private-prisons-profit-from-illegal-immigrants/

Now we no longer just deport undocumented immigrants. Your tax payer dollars are keeping people here so that private prisons can make money off these people. Private prisons were a system that started in the 80's, in fact my father was asked if he wanted to invest in a prison set up by some of his "Christian" friends. The idea is that the government will contract you to keep prisoners, all while you profit off the labor, like licence plates or a number of other things. Basically the government pays the prisons to house the prisoners, then pays the prisons for the goods and services (fire fighters and clean up crew) that are produced. These prisons are getting paid double from holding people.

It's the perfect business because you can abuse these people and no one will care. People hate criminals and they think of these people as different and less than human. The reality is, the vast majority are in for non-violent crime, usually drug position. Also minority communities are targeted, even though study after study show whites are more likely to use and sell drugs, it's the minority communities that are targeted which causes violence in the streets between rival gangs and cops and it becomes a war. Also, jail was ORIGINALLY a place to rehabilitate a person who could comeback to society and hopefully they wouldn't repeat their crime. Well a felon has over an 80% chance of going back to prison, which defeats the purpose of rehabilitation. We need alternative methods to dealing with non-violent criminals. After all, if this was really about a war on drugs, why not have a raid on a college campus on any given Friday night, or high school football party after a game? This is about more than drugs.
 

virtuoso

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2013, 01:10:53 AM »
Which is why these so called black community leaders are also devils. They don't. Give a fuck about anyone they simply position themselves to exploit any kind of even perceived fringe racism. As for the war on drugs being a sick joke I only have to look at soldiers walking through poppy fields and not burning them to the ground to understand that. Or if that was not damming enough look at how the criminality of HSBC laundering billions in Mexico drug money was met with essentially a ruling that they needed to give back a small percentage of those profits.
 

M Dogg™

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2013, 08:20:32 AM »
Which is why these so called black community leaders are also devils. They don't. Give a fuck about anyone they simply position themselves to exploit any kind of even perceived fringe racism. As for the war on drugs being a sick joke I only have to look at soldiers walking through poppy fields and not burning them to the ground to understand that. Or if that was not damming enough look at how the criminality of HSBC laundering billions in Mexico drug money was met with essentially a ruling that they needed to give back a small percentage of those profits.

Oh, there is no question that's true. Al Sharpton has always been about getting himself in front. In fact it was many black leaders who pushed for harder crack laws in the 80's at the beginning of the War of Drugs. There has been a movement around minority communities which turns in our own youth into the system and makes it almost impossible for them to survive. This plan was laid out in the 80's, at the time many my age were just being born, and many my age were the first to go through this at the dawn of Gangsta Rap. I'll never blame the music, as it was very reflective of the times, but people got caught up and glorified the culture they saw on TV and tried to be like X-Raided, Spice 1 and Lil' Rob.

"We ain't meant to survive, cause it's a setup"
 

Reef

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2013, 05:32:00 PM »
Wanted to throw a quote or two in here but there were too many. All points about the privatised prisons and profit making I agree with and you can see that its not just music, not just rap, but all forms of media, newspapers, TV, Films, CNN, BBC, they all in some way perpetuate similar messages. But back to the point in hand, and the point I wanted to make. You guys I would assume are mostly looking at American citizens or residents. In the UK the exact same thing has been happening and is happening right now but I would argue that, at least in the UK, the system is colour blind and it plays on more of a deep rooted societal class system (in an apparently classless society, but dont get me started) where the messages opress the working and lower classes regardless of skin colour. I'm not for a minute saying it equal between say blacks and whites because I'm speaking anecdotally not from statistics. Would my friends from the States say if you looked beyond race that you'd see a class division here rather than a race one?
 

Chamillitary Click

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2013, 07:57:40 PM »
Doesn't surprise me one bit lol.
 

Furor Teutonicus

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2013, 01:53:11 AM »
Good article.

I have to admit, these devilish sociopaths are pretty clever.
It's ridiculous how many 'documentations' about US prisons are in German TV. Literally every prison gets its own documentation. Yet none of them questions the system behind these mass incarcerations.
 

Fraxxx

Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2013, 04:57:50 AM »
Good article.

I have to admit, these devilish sociopaths are pretty clever.
It's ridiculous how many 'documentations' about US prisons are in German TV. Literally every prison gets its own documentation. Yet none of them questions the system behind these mass incarcerations.

The necessary next step is transforming Cyprus into a prison island.
i don´t need any medicate shit im 100 normal.
 

M Dogg™

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2013, 10:10:22 AM »
It's more than just the music. In the United States, it's damn near modern sla.... opps can't say that.



Once I get my old spot at DubCNN back, you'll see some more provocative stuff posted and I think the Hip Hop community now needs to take this on. Obviously the mainstream artist might not even touch it, but there are artist out there who have following that need to spread this message outside of just Immortal Technique.

Read Michelle Alexander's "The New Jim Crow." She gets into this topic and really takes apart the war on drugs and private prisons. Meeting her last year is actually when I started to look into this, and I have learned so much. As far as movement goes, I think prison reform will be the last movement I'll ever see in my life, so I figure I should do my part in trying to put the word out.
 

Fraxxx

Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2013, 12:22:49 PM »
Seriously, you CAN know everything if you WANT to know. You don't even have to read, there are good documentaries about everything.

Private prisons and the prison-industrial complex are a huge fuckery but the fun really starts only after, let's say, after there is no more fish in the ocean in 40-50 years.

It's fuckin ridiculous how man not only exploits his own kind but the very resources he's dependent on. And honestly, I don't give a fuck. I don't and won't have children but everybody who does or wants to have kids should wake the fuck up and stop being part of the problem.

rant over ;D
i don´t need any medicate shit im 100 normal.
 

virtuoso

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Re: The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2013, 03:06:14 PM »

Once I get my old spot at DubCNN back, you'll see some more provocative stuff posted and I think the Hip Hop community now needs to take this on. Obviously the mainstream artist might not even touch it, but there are artist out there who have following that need to spread this message outside of just Immortal Technique.

Read Michelle Alexander's "The New Jim Crow." She gets into this topic and really takes apart the war on drugs and private prisons. Meeting her last year is actually when I started to look into this, and I have learned so much. As far as movement goes, I think prison reform will be the last movement I'll ever see in my life, so I figure I should do my part in trying to put the word out.

You and I aren't really so different, although I don't think your provocative posts will eclipse mine in the provocative stakes lol. Okay, so addressing this question of music, you are right of course in that this music wasn't created per sa, but what you can see illustrated in this damning expose of the reality of what occurred, they pushed this message to degrade moral values, to create false, artificial goals, to wreck and destroy, to kill people's souls. I took the last part of what you wrote to convey why it is important that people do not shrug their shoulders and fall into apathy. That is almost a passive form of accpetance, this criminality should never be normalised. Yes, things are probably going to get worse but the harder they push, the harder we should push back.
Standing up is empowering and whether or not it's a popular view, who gives a shit, people take comfort in fitting in but having these views challenged is really what diversity should be about. The diversity of thought, opinions, not simply doing what is considered to be the conventional