Author Topic: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?  (Read 482 times)

KrazySumwhat

  • Guest
Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« on: April 17, 2014, 07:41:19 PM »
(ooops i meant to post this in the out bound connections..my bad)
Not sure if iam late on this? i dont recall seeing it discussed here?
 Also i keep seeing shit about it on face book and other rappers reactios to it. (for those who cant be bothered reading, he speaking on the state of hip hop, whites in hip hop, gays in hip hop, etc).




130666139-580.jpg

Last winter, a rapper whom most people haven’t heard of posted a photo on his Instagram account showing a black male model walking down a runway in a colorful skirt. In the caption, the rapper made a disapproving reference to Kanye West, implying that if it wasn’t for the flamboyant fashion sense that West had been exhibiting of late—he had performed on television in a black leather skirt by Givenchy—black men would not be going around dressed like this. The post was tagged “half a fag.”

The Instagram account belonged to Lord Jamar, who is forty-five years old and a member of the group Brand Nubian, which peaked more than twenty years ago but continues to command respect among fans of nineties-era underground rap. As a solo artist, Lord Jamar had struggled: after putting out one album, in 2006, he tried to fund a follow-up on Kickstarter, in 2012, but raised less than a quarter of his ten-thousand-dollar goal. Whatever his past glories—Brand Nubian’s 1990 début, “One for All,” is considered a classic by some—Jamar had become a largely irrelevant figure in contemporary hip-hop. But then there was the Instagram post, followed shortly after by the release of a song called “Lift up Your Skirt,” in which Jamar attacked West for his wardrobe and for generally being the “pioneer of this queer shit” in hip-hop. The track did its job. Suddenly he was being asked to sit for interviews and expound on everything he believed was wrong with modern rap—not just the fashion stuff but the general softening of the culture, as well as the infiltration of the genre by white artists.

“You can’t just arrogantly wear whatever the fuck you want to wear on some ‘self-expression’ bullshit,” Jamar said in a clip posted on VladTV, a popular hip-hop-themed YouTube channel. “Because in order to preserve a culture there are certain guidelines and boundaries that have to be there.” Jamar’s incendiary comments, informed in part by his beliefs as a member of the Five Percenters, an offshoot of the Nation of Islam, made for great copy. A little more than a year later, he has become hip-hop’s most prominent reactionary: a fierce defender of “traditional” values in rap at a moment when the genre, and the increasingly diverse culture that has grown up around it, is changing rapidly. While established artists like Drake and Kanye join younger up-and-comers like Chance the Rapper, Chief Keef, and Young Thug in pushing the boundaries of what hip-hop can sound like and rejecting old ideas about how rappers should be expected to act, Lord Jamar has become a spokesman for frustrated fans who long for more straightforward times. “I’m that voice of what hip-hop used to be,” Jamar said in a recent phone interview, from his home in New York City. “I think I represent the hip-hop conservatives. And I use the word ‘conservative’ in the sense of conservation: I’m trying to conserve hip-hop and its essence.”

Asked whether he has any sympathy for artists who are driven to chart their own path instead of following their predecessors, Jamar responded with ambivalence. “I have no problems with pushing boundaries,” he said. “But everything has its limits. How far do you go with this pushing of boundaries before you’ve turned it into something else? That’s what I want to know. How much water can you add into the whiskey before you no longer get drunk?”

It’s lines like this that have made Jamar a phenomenon on rap blogs and social media since he first appeared on VladTV, where his gifts as a provocateur have been harnessed to great effect by the site’s proprietor and viral mastermind, Vladimir Lyubovny. Vlad, as he is known, is a Russian immigrant whose family moved from Kiev to California to escape Soviet anti-Semitism in the late seventies. Since last February, he has conducted multiple interviews with Jamar for VladTV, and has made a point of asking other rappers to respond to his comments, knowing that their reactions will generate even more headlines.

Through these interviews—which Lyubovny chops up into short, shareable clips and rolls out one by one over the course of several weeks—the former computer programmer has almost single-handedly put Jamar at the center of the hip-hop culture wars. “He’ll come in and do a crazy interview and it’ll do big numbers,” Lyubovny said last weekend, from Los Angeles. “I’ve made Jamar into an Internet celebrity.” Jamar thinks of it differently. “Vlad’s been like my distributor, basically,” he said. “He’s the distributor of the message.”

* * *

The notion of bringing hip-hop back to its roots is nothing new: every few years, it seems, someone will get on a soapbox and proclaim that things have gotten out of hand, and that a return to basics is urgently needed. Lately we’ve been hearing this not just from Lord Jamar but from fans of self-consciously “lyrical” rappers like Kendrick Lamar and the young nineties nostalgist Joey Bada$$. But for Jamar the problem goes deeper than aesthetics: what he sees when he looks out at the contemporary hip-hop landscape is a culture that’s in the process of being stolen from the people who created it. Kanye’s skirt, as he sees it, is the result of a long-running campaign to make rap more palatable to the white people who listen to it.

“To the average white person, a strong black man is scary,” Jamar told VladTV in an interview last year. “So what do we do? Let’s feminize him, emasculate him, sissify him, to make us feel more comfortable.” More recently, he was quoted saying that the way things were going—with Macklemore winning the Grammy for Rap Album of the Year, and other white artists, like Mac Miller and Action Bronson, being embraced by critics and fans who don’t even seem to notice their race—it wouldn’t be long before it starts to “seem odd for a black man to do hip-hop.”

“At the end of the day, it’s another hijacking of the genre, which we’ve seen in history time and time again,” Jamar said when we spoke on the phone. “Look, it happened in rock and roll. It happened with jazz. Twenty years from now, we’re gonna have the equivalent of Kenny G rapping. Because Kenny G is jazz now! So we’re gonna have some Kenny G-type rappers, and it’s gonna be a white dude with balding hair, in a suit, doing it at the lounge in Vegas.”

If this strikes you as paranoid or cartoonishly unlikely, consider that white rappers have been proliferating and finding great success, while an abominable genre known as “frat rap,” which consists mostly of college-age white guys in baseball hats rapping for other white guys at house parties, has blossomed into a full-scale subculture. “It’s like they’ve circumvented us,” Jamar said recently on the Combat Jack Radio Show. “Before you had Eminem, but he wanted the approval of black people—he looked up to black artists, and he busted his ass to get that approval respectfully.… Now you’re getting into a generation of white m.c.s who worship just white m.c.s, and have an audience of just white people.”

Macklemore and Ryan Lewis have been a particular source of anger for Lord Jamar, in large part because of the success of their pro-gay-marriage single “Same Love.” That song, in which Macklemore admonishes hip-hop culture for not being more tolerant of homosexuality, encapsulates everything Jamar believes is wrong with the current hip-hop landscape; it struck him, he said, as the equivalent of someone walking into a stranger’s home and trying to redecorate the living room. In September, he gave an interview on VladTV in which he addressed white rappers directly, telling them, “You are guests in the house of hip-hop… Keep it real with yourselves: you know this is a black man’s thing. We started this. This is our shit.” Macklemore, Jamar said, may love hip-hop, and some of his songs might even be pretty good. “But he’s trying to push an agenda that he, as a white man, feels is acceptable,” he added. “Those proclivities and sensibilities are not at the core of true hip-hop.”

On one level this is a straightforward argument: white people are trying to impose their middle-class liberal values on a culture that is not their own. But what’s tricky for Jamar—and what’s led a number of rappers whom Vlad has asked about his remarks to dismiss him as out of touch—is that it’s not just Macklemore out there demonstrating that being a tough, masculine guy is no longer required in hip-hop. Black rappers are doing this, too. And while Young Thug, Drake, Kanye, and Chance aren’t going around making corny statement songs endorsing gay marriage, the music they are putting out, and the public personas they are cultivating, end up pointing in the same direction.

“These are not dudes you would hold up as examples of traditional masculinity,” said Soren Baker, the news editor at HipHopDX.com, a Web site that has published numerous articles about Lord Jamar’s comments since last year. “Rap, for a long time, in the seventies, eighties, and nineties, was a very masculine-driven entity. And that’s what Lord Jamar knows, what he likes, and what he holds in regard. So that bothers him.” Put more bluntly, by Jamar himself: “This started with the alpha males. And now it’s being given to the beta males to try to flex their shit.”

The way these “beta males” are overwhelmingly beloved by critics and praised for their creativity feels to Jamar almost like a conspiracy: an attempt by the establishment, “the haves as opposed to the have-nots,” as he puts it, to push something onto hip-hop fans that they wouldn’t otherwise want. “ ‘Yeezus’ was wack to me,” Jamar said, in reference to Kanye West’s most recent album, a strange and sonically abrasive work that received acclaim and solidified West in the eyes of many as this era’s most important pop star. “You got people who blindly say, ‘That album was so genius.’ And those are the people who will take hip-hop and fucking let it drive right off the fucking cliff—who will listen to ‘Yeezus’ and say, ‘That was so artistic, the way he drove hip-hop off a cliff.’ ”

Jamar knows how this comes off—that a lot of people are likely to dismiss his arguments as the flailing of an old man who can’t come to terms with the present. But that’s not how he sees it. “This is not an age thing,” he said. “I have plenty of young people coming up to me every day thanking me for what I’m saying. I’ve got eighteen-, nineteen-year-olds coming up to me saying, ‘I love your videos on VladTV—you’ve been saying that real shit motherfuckers are scared to say.’ ” His message, in other words, is not about fear of change, or a resistance to passing the baton to the next generation. It’s about not pouring too much water into the whiskey.

The day after Jamar and I talked, a young rapper called Le1f, who is black and openly gay, performed live on “The Late Show With David Letterman” in support of his new EP, “Hey,” the most high-profile release of his career to date. Later, when someone sent the video to Lord Jamar on Twitter, he responded, “THIS IS JUST THE BEGINNING!”

SOURCE:http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/culture/2014/03/lord-jamar-rap-hip-hop-conservative.html

Ive seen reactions/responses from N.O.R.E, Pharoahe Monch, Buck shot, R.A the rugged man, ice-T, School boy Q, Talib Kweli, pusa t, ETC.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2014, 07:46:55 PM by KrazySumwhat »
 

Hack Wilson - real

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2014, 03:51:23 PM »
"the day a nigga serves Ras is when faggots start straight bashing"


well Ras Kass is about to get served soon apparently
 

Remedy360

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2014, 05:11:49 PM »

, he tried to fund a follow-up on Kickstarter, in 2012, but raised less than a quarter of his ten-thousand-dollar goal.

On a side note, ouch.
 

Jimmy H.

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2014, 06:58:19 PM »
I think Jamar has some valid criticisms but there's this amusing irony about this idea of "hip-hop conservatives". The big challenge with conservative ideals is you're trying to sell the idea of the past to the future. The nature of all cultures is it is a young man's world. The younger generation is going to run it all and there is this fear amongst the older crowd that what we spent a lifetime building is going to fade into obscurity under the watch of younger people who are ignorant to its values. The thing is hip-hop, beyond being black or white, gay or straight, rich or poor, is a youth culture. It was founded on taking what was old and forgotten and flipping it and making its own thing.

When it first infiltrated the mainstream, it was taking old funk and soul and even rock and roll records and sampling them, sometimes with crude expressions of violence, sexual innuendo, or profanity. For all the wealth and influence conservative America supposedly had, you had wealthy upscale white kids who now wanted to talk and act like they were poor black kids.  A lot of these liberal middle-aged couples who preached equality and came up on the civil rights movement, we're now secretly scared about this dangerous music. Hip-hop culture was the liberal-minded racist's worst nightmare.

Now, it's a twenty-year gap and our generation is becoming the "parental figures". And how does one rebel against parents who grew up smoking weed and listening to gangsta rap music? By threatening what is comfortable.  Instead of wearing saggy jeans and "gang clothes", now they are dressing in tight shirts and skinny jeans.  Instead of white dads worrying about their daughters bringing home black boyfriends, now people are nervous about their sons bringing home boyfriends.  In the end, most of it is all paranoia. There is always going to be a rebellion to what is the norm. The folks who grew up in church-going traditional 1950's America believed that you enlisted and fought for your country.  The youth backlash from that was a generation that would rather take drugs and fuck than go fight wars. What it all boils down to is the youth is always going to be the ones steering the ship.  The guys who were it in the 90's aren't going to be the ones calling the shots no more. You get that limited window to be the voice.  Once your time is up, the next group is going to take what they perceive to be the best parts of your message and roll with it until someone comes along and grabs it from them.

 

Blood$

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2014, 12:18:14 PM »
somebody link me to a Lord Jamar classic and I'll actually care about anything he has to bitch about
 

Black Excellence

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10835
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Karma: -228
  • Niggaz Hatin' On Me But They Bitch Ain't
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2014, 12:43:28 PM »
  8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)
"Summa y'all #mediocres more worried bout my goings on than u is about ya own.... But that ain't none of my business so.....I'll just #SipTeaForKermit #ifitaintaboutdamoney #2sugarspleaseFollow," - T.I.
 

Jack Trippa 3z company ho

  • Muthafuckin' Double OG
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 715
  • Karma: 24
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2014, 03:34:05 PM »
That article is written really slanted and takes lots digs at Jamar insinuating he's a failure and a nobody. Faggot agenda at work.

He is spot on with his assessments.
 

Jack Trippa 3z company ho

  • Muthafuckin' Double OG
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 715
  • Karma: 24
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2014, 03:39:46 PM »
I think Jamar has some valid criticisms but there's this amusing irony about this idea of "hip-hop conservatives". The big challenge with conservative ideals is you're trying to sell the idea of the past to the future. The nature of all cultures is it is a young man's world. The younger generation is going to run it all and there is this fear amongst the older crowd that what we spent a lifetime building is going to fade into obscurity under the watch of younger people who are ignorant to its values. The thing is hip-hop, beyond being black or white, gay or straight, rich or poor, is a youth culture. It was founded on taking what was old and forgotten and flipping it and making its own thing.

When it first infiltrated the mainstream, it was taking old funk and soul and even rock and roll records and sampling them, sometimes with crude expressions of violence, sexual innuendo, or profanity. For all the wealth and influence conservative America supposedly had, you had wealthy upscale white kids who now wanted to talk and act like they were poor black kids.  A lot of these liberal middle-aged couples who preached equality and came up on the civil rights movement, we're now secretly scared about this dangerous music. Hip-hop culture was the liberal-minded racist's worst nightmare.

Now, it's a twenty-year gap and our generation is becoming the "parental figures". And how does one rebel against parents who grew up smoking weed and listening to gangsta rap music? By threatening what is comfortable.  Instead of wearing saggy jeans and "gang clothes", now they are dressing in tight shirts and skinny jeans.  Instead of white dads worrying about their daughters bringing home black boyfriends, now people are nervous about their sons bringing home boyfriends.  In the end, most of it is all paranoia. There is always going to be a rebellion to what is the norm. The folks who grew up in church-going traditional 1950's America believed that you enlisted and fought for your country.  The youth backlash from that was a generation that would rather take drugs and fuck than go fight wars. What it all boils down to is the youth is always going to be the ones steering the ship.  The guys who were it in the 90's aren't going to be the ones calling the shots no more. You get that limited window to be the voice.  Once your time is up, the next group is going to take what they perceive to be the best parts of your message and roll with it until someone comes along and grabs it from them.



You're rationalizing and justifying faggotry, basically saying its a natural progression and anyone who disagrees is out of touch with the times.

You're being bamboozled/brainwashed.
 

Sir Petey

  • Shot Caller
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7618
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Karma: 714
  • ♛ bitch I'm flawless ♛
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2014, 05:57:31 PM »
I think Jamar has some valid criticisms but there's this amusing irony about this idea of "hip-hop conservatives". The big challenge with conservative ideals is you're trying to sell the idea of the past to the future. The nature of all cultures is it is a young man's world. The younger generation is going to run it all and there is this fear amongst the older crowd that what we spent a lifetime building is going to fade into obscurity under the watch of younger people who are ignorant to its values. The thing is hip-hop, beyond being black or white, gay or straight, rich or poor, is a youth culture. It was founded on taking what was old and forgotten and flipping it and making its own thing.

When it first infiltrated the mainstream, it was taking old funk and soul and even rock and roll records and sampling them, sometimes with crude expressions of violence, sexual innuendo, or profanity. For all the wealth and influence conservative America supposedly had, you had wealthy upscale white kids who now wanted to talk and act like they were poor black kids.  A lot of these liberal middle-aged couples who preached equality and came up on the civil rights movement, we're now secretly scared about this dangerous music. Hip-hop culture was the liberal-minded racist's worst nightmare.

Now, it's a twenty-year gap and our generation is becoming the "parental figures". And how does one rebel against parents who grew up smoking weed and listening to gangsta rap music? By threatening what is comfortable.  Instead of wearing saggy jeans and "gang clothes", now they are dressing in tight shirts and skinny jeans.  Instead of white dads worrying about their daughters bringing home black boyfriends, now people are nervous about their sons bringing home boyfriends.  In the end, most of it is all paranoia. There is always going to be a rebellion to what is the norm. The folks who grew up in church-going traditional 1950's America believed that you enlisted and fought for your country.  The youth backlash from that was a generation that would rather take drugs and fuck than go fight wars. What it all boils down to is the youth is always going to be the ones steering the ship.  The guys who were it in the 90's aren't going to be the ones calling the shots no more. You get that limited window to be the voice.  Once your time is up, the next group is going to take what they perceive to be the best parts of your message and roll with it until someone comes along and grabs it from them.





tabernacle

Blood$

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2014, 06:35:57 PM »
  8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

well even though he's part of a group and I meant solo tracks this is a classic  8)
 

Sir Petey

  • Shot Caller
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7618
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Karma: 714
  • ♛ bitch I'm flawless ♛
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2014, 07:00:25 PM »
i totally disagree with all the fag shit but its that counter culture element, there pissing off their elders like we did with our baggy shit and gang wear african medaliions dread locks so on and so forth


nigga at one time nwas 501s was so tight that they were just a notch above jeggins.

Jimmy H.

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2014, 10:41:43 PM »
You're rationalizing and justifying faggotry, basically saying its a natural progression and anyone who disagrees is out of touch with the times.

You're being bamboozled/brainwashed.
Call it however you want to, pal. It's hard to argue the idea of my so-called brainwashing when I am not a consumer of the music that you're complaining about. The difference is rather than spending my time whining about how Lil Wayne is a fag and how secret societies are using his music to dismantle the culture, I just don't listen to the shit.  Period.  It's not about being out of touch. It's about understanding the reality of how pop culture works. The kids with the disposable income and plenty of free time are going to decide what is popular in culture. It was the same way when we were in high school as well and we'll continue to be that way.

Thing is if anyone was really paying attention, you would see that historically, nothing much actually is changing. People are still all so worried about how the music that young people are listening to is damaging our culture. The thing is the kids aren't taking it that seriously. They'll listen to this shit for a years, wear whatever stupid shit is in style, and then they'll grow out of it like most people do when they get to a certain age and have a nostalgic laugh about it with their friends in twenty years when they are all married with kids.

Yes, it is I, who has been bamboozled/brainwashed because I refuse to be shocked by the idea that teenagers and college kids are buying into cultural fads. It's just so alarming. I mean I bet not one person on here got interested in Death Row after watching a Dr. Dre video on MTV or hearing the song on the radio or because it was one of the first albums their friends brought into school with that "Parental Advisory" sticker warning that their parents hated. And it was all because of its strong political message and poignant lyrical depth and nothing to do with all the swearing, violence, or sex talk. It's actually a known fact that corporations lost billions of dollars on advertising in the 80's and 90's because kids of that generation were too smart to be fooled into buying something just because a commercial with their favorite entertainer made it look cool. Never happened. We were too busy letting angry middle-aged men tell us what cool music was. And we were always grateful for our parents' input as well.

 

KrazySumwhat

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2014, 01:37:28 AM »
 Some good replies.
 And yeah i probably should've linked the actual statement in only Jamar's words, as opposed to the author i linked up adding in his own opinions.
 I guess its one of those things hey, of course he will be accused of being bitter and old and washed up, out of touch etc, yet he's allowed to express his opinions and he dose make some valid points.
 Yeah its funny huh, rap is a young mans game and i think that these days more than ever young people really don't give a fuck about what older people say or think and will go out of their way to be different or think that older people or the old ways are un cool or what not.
 I think it has always been this way but i think that people now see 30 as being very old. Young kids will look up to young rappers and want to look and be like them.
 It is hard to imagine hip hop been considered uncool or lame and being gay. Yet it has become a bit like that hey? the fashion and the horrible embarrassing music.
 It seems that fashion always changes each decade or so but then history kind of repeats?

 Anyways, i agree with some of jamars comments but i do think he was a little out of line and border line racist in some parts. Most of the other rappers that have replied seem to indicate that Jamar was out of line and being a bit ignorant and racist, out of touch.
 Most responses are that hip hop is for everybody and it isn't just a black thing, etc.
 I honestly doubt that it would ever been taken over by whites or for it to be more common for whites to be rappers but as i type this, i guess i can see where jamar is coming from.
 I know that here in Australia that Aussie hip hop has become very big and that the kids, new generations that have grown up with the likes of Eminem and there now being a big Aussie rap scene that is actually taken seriously, it seems that all the new young hip hop heads mostly listen to white hip hop.
 Local hip hop that they can relate to more.
 So i guess there is truth in Jamars foresight in that sense.
 Its funny because when i was a kid there were almost no white rappers and there wasn't much of a local rap scene and the Aussie rap i remember back then was fucking shit house and embarrassing.
 Even now i respect Aussie rap but i don't listen to it or like much of it. But the younger kids all follow that scene and go to white rap shows and battles, etc.
 Its funny to trying to get my youngest brother into the hip hop and rappers that i grew up with. Whilst he likes wu tang and kurupt he was actually a big 50 an lil wayne fan for a while there and he preferred old eminem or mostly likes Australian rap.
 he also made a comment to me that spun me out. Some rap that i played him, he didn't like how they said the word nigga so much.
 I never really thought about it like that because that was just the norm for me yet now the kids have a local rap scene where its something they can more relate to and it isn't full of American or black slang and way of living.

 Also, there is so much shit American rap coming out now, so much embarrassing black rap. Now, whilst i have yet to hear ANY Australian rappers or MANY white American rappers that i like better than black rappers and as lyrical or that make such dope music, it has to be said that most white hip hop(both American and non American) that i hear dose indeed sound like actual hip hop.
 By that i mean it sounds old school. It dosent have(as much) pop and rnb hooks and its reality rap or story telling in a way in that is either party music or it has a message. I always hear white rap with old school sounding sampling and scratches and its just rap that isn't all about bling or murder. just not as lyrical or not as good rapping(as alot of black rappers) lol.
 And i dont hear white rappers all trying to jump on that south sound.
 So many white graffiti artist and dj's too.

 Anyways i find myself feeling old. Iam often making comments about kids these days lol. The fashion, the hair styles, the music, the state of hip hop, etc...

 I cant really comment on the whole gay thing but it is unimaginable for me personally for it to be accepted in hip hop or for a openly gay rapper to ever be taken seriously.

 On a side note, i am a Lord Jamar fan. I have several of brand Nubian album(and yes i skip the "black and proud" song lol) but iam mostly a fan of Sadat X.
 Hmmm, i wonder what Jamar thinks about sadat's recent song he did with ra the rugged man and and vinne paz?
 
 If you use google or look on you tube there are alot of other rappers responses to this.
 
 I feel rappers cant win anyways. Look at DPG. they do 90's style gangsta shit, they accused of being washed up and stuck in the 90's. they do something different and experimental and more modern and they get criticized and everyone wants them to go back to the gangsta shit. Just like Snoop.
 
 Thank god for rappers like Nas whom have done very well at pleasing old and new heads but he can get fucked for telling me he dosent need me on his last album... :'(

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 03:52:28 AM by KrazySumwhat »
 

KrazySumwhat

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2014, 03:00:10 AM »
 Just seen this on face book. Seemed kind of relevant.

 even though none of them are white.
 

Seagully

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2014, 03:16:09 AM »
Some good replies.
 And yeah i probably should've linked the actual statement in only Jamar's words, as opposed to the author i linked up adding in his own opinions.
 I guess its one of those things hey, of course he will be accused of being bitter and old and washed up, out of touch etc, yet he's allowed to express his opinions and he dose make some valid points.
 Yeah its funny huh, rap is a young mans game and i think that these days more than ever young people really dont give a fuck about what older people say or think and will go out of their way to be different or think that older people or the old ways are un cool or what not.
 I think it has always been this way but i think that people now see 30 as being very old. Young kids will look up young rappers and want to look and be like them.
 It is hard to imagine hip hop been considered uncool or lame and being gay. Yet it has become a bit like that hey? the fashion and the horrible embarrassing music.
 It seems that fashion always changes each decade or so but then history kind of repeats?

 Anyways, i agree with some of jamars comments but i do think he was a little out of line and border line racist in some parts. Most of the other rappers that have replied seem to indicate that Jamar was out of line and being a bit ignorant and racist, out of touch.
 Most responses are that hip hop is for everybody and it isnt just a black think, etc.
 I honestly doubt that it would ever been taken over by whites or for it to be more common for whites to be rappers but as i type this, i guess i can see where jamar is coming from.
 I know that here in Australia that Aussie hip hop has become very big and that the kids, new generations that have grown up with the likes of Eminem and there now being a big Aussie rap scene that is actually taken seriously, it seems that all the new young hip hop heads mostly listen to white hip hop.
 Local hip hop that they can relate too more.
 So i guess there is truth in Jamars foresight in that sense.
 Its funny because when i was a kid there were almost no white rappers and there wasn't much of a local rap scene and the Aussie rap i remember back then was fucking shit house and embarrassing.
 Even now i respect Aussie rap but i don't listen to it or like much of it. But the younger kids all follow that scene and go to white rap shows and battles, etc.
 Its funny too trying to get my youngest brother into the hip hop and rappers that i grew up with. Whilst he likes wu tang and kurupt he was actually a big 50 an lil wayne fan for a while there and he preferred old eminem or mostly likes Australian rap.
 he also made a comment to me that spun me out. Some rap that i played him, he didn't like how they said the word nigga so much.
 I never really thought about it like that because that was just the norm for me yet now the kids have a local rap scene where its something they can more relate to and it isn't full of American or black slang and way of living.

 Also, there is so much shit American rap coming out now, so much embarrassing black rap. Now, whilst i have yet to hear ANY Australian rappers or MANY white American rappers that i like better than black rappers and as lyrical or that make such dope music, it has to be said that most white hip hop(both American and non American) that i hear dose indeed sound like actual hip hop.
 By that i mean it sounds old school. It dosent have pop and rnb hooks and its reality rap or story telling in a way in that is either party music or it has a message. I always hear white rap with old school sounding sampling and scratches and its just rap that isn't all about bling or murder. just not as lyrical or not as good rapping lol.
 And i dont hear white rappers all trying to jump on that south sound.
 So many white graffiti artist and dj's too.

 Anyways i find myself feeling old. Iam often making comments about kids these days lol. The fashion, the hair styles, the music, the state of hip hop, etc...

 I cant really comment on the whole gay thing but it is unimaginable for me personally for it to be accepted in hip hop or for a openly gay rapper to ever be taken seriously.

 On a side note, i am a Lord Jamar fan. I have several of brand Nubian album(and yes i skip the "black and proud" song lol) but iam mostly a fan of Sadat X.
 Hmmm, i wonder what Jamar thinks about sadat's recent song he did with ra the rugged man and and vinne paz?
 
 If you use google or look on you tube there are alot of other rappers responses to this.
 
 I feel rappers cant win anyways. Look at DPG. they do 90's style gangsta shit, they accused of being washed up and stuck in the 90's. they do something different and experimental and more modern and they get criticized and everyone wants them to go back to the gangsta shit. Just like Snoop.
 
 Thank god for rappers like Nas whom have done very well at pleasing old and new heads but he can get fucked for telling me he dosent need me on his last album... :'(

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

tl;dr
 

KrazySumwhat

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2014, 03:46:00 AM »
 good points man, really good constructive and insightful. I really feel what your sayin. Your posts are always so meaningful, you really contribute to the board greatly.
 
 

KrazySumwhat

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2014, 04:01:58 AM »
 I guess to put it short, being in my 30's and growing up in the 90's i can feel and relate to alot of Jamars comments but being white i cant completely relate or agree.
 And i do see white rap becoming more popular than black American rap. Not because white kids of the new generation are racist, simply because there's so much white rap now and there is good white rap(which there never was before) and white kids can relate to it more and the whole "black people are so cool" era seems to be over?
 But girly boys, pretty boys and gay as fuck fashion and gay people in rap is not a good look really dose not seem like a change that should be embraced.
 Reminds me a bit of that scene in the movie "21 jump st" when they go back to school and everything has changed, like what is now accepted and considered cool.
 I spose at the end of the day everyone has their opinion but i think all this change is inevitable.
 Kreayshawn was accepted but i cant see a gay dude rapper being popular. But there's that many gays maybe one could do well...
 
 And the comments about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop is bullshit when you consider that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.
 And white people weren't trying to be black, they simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool.
 
 
 

Seagully

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2014, 05:13:55 AM »
good points man, really good constructive and insightful. I really feel what your sayin. Your posts are always so meaningful, you really contribute to the board greatly.
 

THANX! it means ALOT coming from U.
 

David Gutterman

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1096
  • Karma: 50
  • dude, why?
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2014, 05:28:32 AM »
I guess to put it short, being in my 30's and growing up in the 90's i can feel and relate to alot of Jamars comments but being white i cant completely relate or agree.
 And i do see white rap becoming more popular than black American rap. Not because white kids of the new generation are racist, simply because there's so much white rap now and there is good white rap(which there never was before) and white kids can relate to it more and the whole "black people are so cool" era seems to be over?
 But girly boys, pretty boys and gay as fuck fashion and gay people in rap is not a good look really dose not seem like a change that should be embraced.
 Reminds me a bit of that scene in the movie "21 jump st" when they go back to school and everything has changed, like what is now accepted and considered cool.
 I spose at the end of the day everyone has their opinion but i think all this change is inevitable.
 Kreayshawn was accepted but i cant see a gay dude rapper being popular. But there's that many gays maybe one could do well...
 
 And the comments about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop is bullshit when you consider that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.
 And white people weren't trying to be black, they simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool.
 
 

Good stuff, I agree
 

midwestryder

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2014, 08:54:35 AM »
I guess to put it short, being in my 30's and growing up in the 90's i can feel and relate to alot of Jamars comments but being white i cant completely relate or agree.
 And i do see white rap becoming more popular than black American rap. Not because white kids of the new generation are racist, simply because there's so much white rap now and there is good white rap(which there never was before) and white kids can relate to it more and the whole "black people are so cool" era seems to be over?
 But girly boys, pretty boys and gay as fuck fashion and gay people in rap is not a good look really dose not seem like a change that should be embraced.
 Reminds me a bit of that scene in the movie "21 jump st" when they go back to school and everything has changed, like what is now accepted and considered cool.
 I spose at the end of the day everyone has their opinion but i think all this change is inevitable.
 Kreayshawn was accepted but i cant see a gay dude rapper being popular. But there's that many gays maybe one could do well...
 
 And the comments about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop is bullshit when you consider that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.
 And white people weren't trying to be black, they simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool.
 
 
I agree with Lord Jamar about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop . it don't matter that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.. hip hop is culture not a music . hip hop is African American street culture & rap is music of the culture . so yes whites are guest in the house of hip hop . we can not let them steal it & ruin it like the did rock N roll. just because you like something or simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool does not make them a part of it . Lord Jamar is 100% right. ICe t even agreed with Lord Jamar.
 

Jack Trippa 3z company ho

  • Muthafuckin' Double OG
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 715
  • Karma: 24
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2014, 09:52:28 AM »
You're rationalizing and justifying faggotry, basically saying its a natural progression and anyone who disagrees is out of touch with the times.

You're being bamboozled/brainwashed.
Call it however you want to, pal. It's hard to argue the idea of my so-called brainwashing when I am not a consumer of the music that you're complaining about. The difference is rather than spending my time whining about how Lil Wayne is a fag and how secret societies are using his music to dismantle the culture, I just don't listen to the shit.  Period.  It's not about being out of touch. It's about understanding the reality of how pop culture works. The kids with the disposable income and plenty of free time are going to decide what is popular in culture. It was the same way when we were in high school as well and we'll continue to be that way.

Thing is if anyone was really paying attention, you would see that historically, nothing much actually is changing. People are still all so worried about how the music that young people are listening to is damaging our culture. The thing is the kids aren't taking it that seriously. They'll listen to this shit for a years, wear whatever stupid shit is in style, and then they'll grow out of it like most people do when they get to a certain age and have a nostalgic laugh about it with their friends in twenty years when they are all married with kids.

Yes, it is I, who has been bamboozled/brainwashed because I refuse to be shocked by the idea that teenagers and college kids are buying into cultural fads. It's just so alarming. I mean I bet not one person on here got interested in Death Row after watching a Dr. Dre video on MTV or hearing the song on the radio or because it was one of the first albums their friends brought into school with that "Parental Advisory" sticker warning that their parents hated. And it was all because of its strong political message and poignant lyrical depth and nothing to do with all the swearing, violence, or sex talk. It's actually a known fact that corporations lost billions of dollars on advertising in the 80's and 90's because kids of that generation were too smart to be fooled into buying something just because a commercial with their favorite entertainer made it look cool. Never happened. We were too busy letting angry middle-aged men tell us what cool music was. And we were always grateful for our parents' input as well.



You are brainwashed. You think it's a natural Progression that kids are turning into poo pounders. There is an agenda In place to faggotize as many people as possible. It's not just some random trend or a form of those darn rebellious kids.

If there weren't so many fatherless families today, this faggotry would be snuffed out real quick. These young men have zero guidance combined with no moral standard and this is what you get. This has been engineered on purpose.
 

Blood$

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2014, 10:01:00 AM »
Just seen this on face book. Seemed kind of relevant.

 even though none of them are white.

that was on point until Lil Boosie was mentioned
 

MistaNova

  • Guest
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2014, 10:41:46 AM »
Lol, he thinks that that gay rapper who appeared on Letterman was the start of hip hop turning gay? Hip hop's been a fruity genre since the beginning.
 

Jimmy H.

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2014, 12:29:01 PM »
You are brainwashed. You think it's a natural Progression that kids are turning into poo pounders.
 I don't think music is making kids into homosexuals. I think that people are overly paranoid in that regard.  The people that are gay today were gay long before some rap song made them feel like it was okay.

There is an agenda In place to faggotize as many people as possible. It's not just some random trend or a form of those darn rebellious kids.
 What is the end game of "faggotizing" all these people exactly?


If there weren't so many fatherless families today, this faggotry would be snuffed out real quick. These young men have zero guidance combined with no moral standard and this is what you get. This has been engineered on purpose.
 But what's funny is this is the same conversation that it's always been and you're not seeing it. Corporate America has always been a pimp. Like I said, I agree with what Jamar is saying but a lot of it feels like too little, too late. You can't sell your child to prostitution and be mad that the pimp is undermining the moral values you taught them. All the icons of hip-hop for the last 25 years and counting have been working hand-in-hand with corporate America.

If you asked all those angry, older black folks and liberal whites who didn't like gangsta rap, their argument would not sound unlike what you are saying now about all the gay shit and sissy fashion. "It's not about being out of touch. It's about white corporations selling negative images to our kids." This thing has been going on for a long-ass time and the only way it could have really been stomped out was to deal with the whole situation and not just the few problem areas that certain people objected to.
 

Sir Petey

  • Shot Caller
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7618
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Karma: 714
  • ♛ bitch I'm flawless ♛
Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #24 on: April 22, 2014, 02:43:40 PM »
Some good replies.
 And yeah i probably should've linked the actual statement in only Jamar's words, as opposed to the author i linked up adding in his own opinions.
 I guess its one of those things hey, of course he will be accused of being bitter and old and washed up, out of touch etc, yet he's allowed to express his opinions and he dose make some valid points.
 Yeah its funny huh, rap is a young mans game and i think that these days more than ever young people really dont give a fuck about what older people say or think and will go out of their way to be different or think that older people or the old ways are un cool or what not.
 I think it has always been this way but i think that people now see 30 as being very old. Young kids will look up young rappers and want to look and be like them.
 It is hard to imagine hip hop been considered uncool or lame and being gay. Yet it has become a bit like that hey? the fashion and the horrible embarrassing music.
 It seems that fashion always changes each decade or so but then history kind of repeats?

 Anyways, i agree with some of jamars comments but i do think he was a little out of line and border line racist in some parts. Most of the other rappers that have replied seem to indicate that Jamar was out of line and being a bit ignorant and racist, out of touch.
 Most responses are that hip hop is for everybody and it isnt just a black think, etc.
 I honestly doubt that it would ever been taken over by whites or for it to be more common for whites to be rappers but as i type this, i guess i can see where jamar is coming from.
 I know that here in Australia that Aussie hip hop has become very big and that the kids, new generations that have grown up with the likes of Eminem and there now being a big Aussie rap scene that is actually taken seriously, it seems that all the new young hip hop heads mostly listen to white hip hop.
 Local hip hop that they can relate too more.
 So i guess there is truth in Jamars foresight in that sense.
 Its funny because when i was a kid there were almost no white rappers and there wasn't much of a local rap scene and the Aussie rap i remember back then was fucking shit house and embarrassing.
 Even now i respect Aussie rap but i don't listen to it or like much of it. But the younger kids all follow that scene and go to white rap shows and battles, etc.
 Its funny too trying to get my youngest brother into the hip hop and rappers that i grew up with. Whilst he likes wu tang and kurupt he was actually a big 50 an lil wayne fan for a while there and he preferred old eminem or mostly likes Australian rap.
 he also made a comment to me that spun me out. Some rap that i played him, he didn't like how they said the word nigga so much.
 I never really thought about it like that because that was just the norm for me yet now the kids have a local rap scene where its something they can more relate to and it isn't full of American or black slang and way of living.

 Also, there is so much shit American rap coming out now, so much embarrassing black rap. Now, whilst i have yet to hear ANY Australian rappers or MANY white American rappers that i like better than black rappers and as lyrical or that make such dope music, it has to be said that most white hip hop(both American and non American) that i hear dose indeed sound like actual hip hop.
 By that i mean it sounds old school. It dosent have pop and rnb hooks and its reality rap or story telling in a way in that is either party music or it has a message. I always hear white rap with old school sounding sampling and scratches and its just rap that isn't all about bling or murder. just not as lyrical or not as good rapping lol.
 And i dont hear white rappers all trying to jump on that south sound.
 So many white graffiti artist and dj's too.

 Anyways i find myself feeling old. Iam often making comments about kids these days lol. The fashion, the hair styles, the music, the state of hip hop, etc...

 I cant really comment on the whole gay thing but it is unimaginable for me personally for it to be accepted in hip hop or for a openly gay rapper to ever be taken seriously.

 On a side note, i am a Lord Jamar fan. I have several of brand Nubian album(and yes i skip the "black and proud" song lol) but iam mostly a fan of Sadat X.
 Hmmm, i wonder what Jamar thinks about sadat's recent song he did with ra the rugged man and and vinne paz?
 
 If you use google or look on you tube there are alot of other rappers responses to this.
 
 I feel rappers cant win anyways. Look at DPG. they do 90's style gangsta shit, they accused of being washed up and stuck in the 90's. they do something different and experimental and more modern and they get criticized and everyone wants them to go back to the gangsta shit. Just like Snoop.
 
 Thank god for rappers like Nas whom have done very well at pleasing old and new heads but he can get fucked for telling me he dosent need me on his last album... :'(

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

tl;dr