Author Topic: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?  (Read 553 times)

KrazySumwhat

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2014, 02:46:00 AM »
 good points man, really good constructive and insightful. I really feel what your sayin. Your posts are always so meaningful, you really contribute to the board greatly.
 
 

KrazySumwhat

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2014, 03:01:58 AM »
 I guess to put it short, being in my 30's and growing up in the 90's i can feel and relate to alot of Jamars comments but being white i cant completely relate or agree.
 And i do see white rap becoming more popular than black American rap. Not because white kids of the new generation are racist, simply because there's so much white rap now and there is good white rap(which there never was before) and white kids can relate to it more and the whole "black people are so cool" era seems to be over?
 But girly boys, pretty boys and gay as fuck fashion and gay people in rap is not a good look really dose not seem like a change that should be embraced.
 Reminds me a bit of that scene in the movie "21 jump st" when they go back to school and everything has changed, like what is now accepted and considered cool.
 I spose at the end of the day everyone has their opinion but i think all this change is inevitable.
 Kreayshawn was accepted but i cant see a gay dude rapper being popular. But there's that many gays maybe one could do well...
 
 And the comments about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop is bullshit when you consider that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.
 And white people weren't trying to be black, they simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool.
 
 
 

Seagully

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2014, 04:13:55 AM »
good points man, really good constructive and insightful. I really feel what your sayin. Your posts are always so meaningful, you really contribute to the board greatly.
 

THANX! it means ALOT coming from U.
 

David Gutterman

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2014, 04:28:32 AM »
I guess to put it short, being in my 30's and growing up in the 90's i can feel and relate to alot of Jamars comments but being white i cant completely relate or agree.
 And i do see white rap becoming more popular than black American rap. Not because white kids of the new generation are racist, simply because there's so much white rap now and there is good white rap(which there never was before) and white kids can relate to it more and the whole "black people are so cool" era seems to be over?
 But girly boys, pretty boys and gay as fuck fashion and gay people in rap is not a good look really dose not seem like a change that should be embraced.
 Reminds me a bit of that scene in the movie "21 jump st" when they go back to school and everything has changed, like what is now accepted and considered cool.
 I spose at the end of the day everyone has their opinion but i think all this change is inevitable.
 Kreayshawn was accepted but i cant see a gay dude rapper being popular. But there's that many gays maybe one could do well...
 
 And the comments about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop is bullshit when you consider that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.
 And white people weren't trying to be black, they simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool.
 
 

Good stuff, I agree
 

midwestryder

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2014, 07:54:35 AM »
I guess to put it short, being in my 30's and growing up in the 90's i can feel and relate to alot of Jamars comments but being white i cant completely relate or agree.
 And i do see white rap becoming more popular than black American rap. Not because white kids of the new generation are racist, simply because there's so much white rap now and there is good white rap(which there never was before) and white kids can relate to it more and the whole "black people are so cool" era seems to be over?
 But girly boys, pretty boys and gay as fuck fashion and gay people in rap is not a good look really dose not seem like a change that should be embraced.
 Reminds me a bit of that scene in the movie "21 jump st" when they go back to school and everything has changed, like what is now accepted and considered cool.
 I spose at the end of the day everyone has their opinion but i think all this change is inevitable.
 Kreayshawn was accepted but i cant see a gay dude rapper being popular. But there's that many gays maybe one could do well...
 
 And the comments about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop is bullshit when you consider that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.
 And white people weren't trying to be black, they simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool.
 
 
I agree with Lord Jamar about whites being a guest in the house of hip hop . it don't matter that in hip hops peak 70% of hip hops sales were white people.. hip hop is culture not a music . hip hop is African American street culture & rap is music of the culture . so yes whites are guest in the house of hip hop . we can not let them steal it & ruin it like the did rock N roll. just because you like something or simply could relate to rap in their own ways and in certain ways and it was cool does not make them a part of it . Lord Jamar is 100% right. ICe t even agreed with Lord Jamar.
 

Jack Trippa 3z company ho

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2014, 08:52:28 AM »
You're rationalizing and justifying faggotry, basically saying its a natural progression and anyone who disagrees is out of touch with the times.

You're being bamboozled/brainwashed.
Call it however you want to, pal. It's hard to argue the idea of my so-called brainwashing when I am not a consumer of the music that you're complaining about. The difference is rather than spending my time whining about how Lil Wayne is a fag and how secret societies are using his music to dismantle the culture, I just don't listen to the shit.  Period.  It's not about being out of touch. It's about understanding the reality of how pop culture works. The kids with the disposable income and plenty of free time are going to decide what is popular in culture. It was the same way when we were in high school as well and we'll continue to be that way.

Thing is if anyone was really paying attention, you would see that historically, nothing much actually is changing. People are still all so worried about how the music that young people are listening to is damaging our culture. The thing is the kids aren't taking it that seriously. They'll listen to this shit for a years, wear whatever stupid shit is in style, and then they'll grow out of it like most people do when they get to a certain age and have a nostalgic laugh about it with their friends in twenty years when they are all married with kids.

Yes, it is I, who has been bamboozled/brainwashed because I refuse to be shocked by the idea that teenagers and college kids are buying into cultural fads. It's just so alarming. I mean I bet not one person on here got interested in Death Row after watching a Dr. Dre video on MTV or hearing the song on the radio or because it was one of the first albums their friends brought into school with that "Parental Advisory" sticker warning that their parents hated. And it was all because of its strong political message and poignant lyrical depth and nothing to do with all the swearing, violence, or sex talk. It's actually a known fact that corporations lost billions of dollars on advertising in the 80's and 90's because kids of that generation were too smart to be fooled into buying something just because a commercial with their favorite entertainer made it look cool. Never happened. We were too busy letting angry middle-aged men tell us what cool music was. And we were always grateful for our parents' input as well.



You are brainwashed. You think it's a natural Progression that kids are turning into poo pounders. There is an agenda In place to faggotize as many people as possible. It's not just some random trend or a form of those darn rebellious kids.

If there weren't so many fatherless families today, this faggotry would be snuffed out real quick. These young men have zero guidance combined with no moral standard and this is what you get. This has been engineered on purpose.
 

Blood$

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2014, 09:01:00 AM »
Just seen this on face book. Seemed kind of relevant.

 even though none of them are white.

that was on point until Lil Boosie was mentioned
 

MistaNova

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #22 on: April 22, 2014, 09:41:46 AM »
Lol, he thinks that that gay rapper who appeared on Letterman was the start of hip hop turning gay? Hip hop's been a fruity genre since the beginning.
 

Jimmy H.

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2014, 11:29:01 AM »
You are brainwashed. You think it's a natural Progression that kids are turning into poo pounders.
 I don't think music is making kids into homosexuals. I think that people are overly paranoid in that regard.  The people that are gay today were gay long before some rap song made them feel like it was okay.

There is an agenda In place to faggotize as many people as possible. It's not just some random trend or a form of those darn rebellious kids.
 What is the end game of "faggotizing" all these people exactly?


If there weren't so many fatherless families today, this faggotry would be snuffed out real quick. These young men have zero guidance combined with no moral standard and this is what you get. This has been engineered on purpose.
 But what's funny is this is the same conversation that it's always been and you're not seeing it. Corporate America has always been a pimp. Like I said, I agree with what Jamar is saying but a lot of it feels like too little, too late. You can't sell your child to prostitution and be mad that the pimp is undermining the moral values you taught them. All the icons of hip-hop for the last 25 years and counting have been working hand-in-hand with corporate America.

If you asked all those angry, older black folks and liberal whites who didn't like gangsta rap, their argument would not sound unlike what you are saying now about all the gay shit and sissy fashion. "It's not about being out of touch. It's about white corporations selling negative images to our kids." This thing has been going on for a long-ass time and the only way it could have really been stomped out was to deal with the whole situation and not just the few problem areas that certain people objected to.
 

Sir Petey

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #24 on: April 22, 2014, 01:43:40 PM »
Some good replies.
 And yeah i probably should've linked the actual statement in only Jamar's words, as opposed to the author i linked up adding in his own opinions.
 I guess its one of those things hey, of course he will be accused of being bitter and old and washed up, out of touch etc, yet he's allowed to express his opinions and he dose make some valid points.
 Yeah its funny huh, rap is a young mans game and i think that these days more than ever young people really dont give a fuck about what older people say or think and will go out of their way to be different or think that older people or the old ways are un cool or what not.
 I think it has always been this way but i think that people now see 30 as being very old. Young kids will look up young rappers and want to look and be like them.
 It is hard to imagine hip hop been considered uncool or lame and being gay. Yet it has become a bit like that hey? the fashion and the horrible embarrassing music.
 It seems that fashion always changes each decade or so but then history kind of repeats?

 Anyways, i agree with some of jamars comments but i do think he was a little out of line and border line racist in some parts. Most of the other rappers that have replied seem to indicate that Jamar was out of line and being a bit ignorant and racist, out of touch.
 Most responses are that hip hop is for everybody and it isnt just a black think, etc.
 I honestly doubt that it would ever been taken over by whites or for it to be more common for whites to be rappers but as i type this, i guess i can see where jamar is coming from.
 I know that here in Australia that Aussie hip hop has become very big and that the kids, new generations that have grown up with the likes of Eminem and there now being a big Aussie rap scene that is actually taken seriously, it seems that all the new young hip hop heads mostly listen to white hip hop.
 Local hip hop that they can relate too more.
 So i guess there is truth in Jamars foresight in that sense.
 Its funny because when i was a kid there were almost no white rappers and there wasn't much of a local rap scene and the Aussie rap i remember back then was fucking shit house and embarrassing.
 Even now i respect Aussie rap but i don't listen to it or like much of it. But the younger kids all follow that scene and go to white rap shows and battles, etc.
 Its funny too trying to get my youngest brother into the hip hop and rappers that i grew up with. Whilst he likes wu tang and kurupt he was actually a big 50 an lil wayne fan for a while there and he preferred old eminem or mostly likes Australian rap.
 he also made a comment to me that spun me out. Some rap that i played him, he didn't like how they said the word nigga so much.
 I never really thought about it like that because that was just the norm for me yet now the kids have a local rap scene where its something they can more relate to and it isn't full of American or black slang and way of living.

 Also, there is so much shit American rap coming out now, so much embarrassing black rap. Now, whilst i have yet to hear ANY Australian rappers or MANY white American rappers that i like better than black rappers and as lyrical or that make such dope music, it has to be said that most white hip hop(both American and non American) that i hear dose indeed sound like actual hip hop.
 By that i mean it sounds old school. It dosent have pop and rnb hooks and its reality rap or story telling in a way in that is either party music or it has a message. I always hear white rap with old school sounding sampling and scratches and its just rap that isn't all about bling or murder. just not as lyrical or not as good rapping lol.
 And i dont hear white rappers all trying to jump on that south sound.
 So many white graffiti artist and dj's too.

 Anyways i find myself feeling old. Iam often making comments about kids these days lol. The fashion, the hair styles, the music, the state of hip hop, etc...

 I cant really comment on the whole gay thing but it is unimaginable for me personally for it to be accepted in hip hop or for a openly gay rapper to ever be taken seriously.

 On a side note, i am a Lord Jamar fan. I have several of brand Nubian album(and yes i skip the "black and proud" song lol) but iam mostly a fan of Sadat X.
 Hmmm, i wonder what Jamar thinks about sadat's recent song he did with ra the rugged man and and vinne paz?
 
 If you use google or look on you tube there are alot of other rappers responses to this.
 
 I feel rappers cant win anyways. Look at DPG. they do 90's style gangsta shit, they accused of being washed up and stuck in the 90's. they do something different and experimental and more modern and they get criticized and everyone wants them to go back to the gangsta shit. Just like Snoop.
 
 Thank god for rappers like Nas whom have done very well at pleasing old and new heads but he can get fucked for telling me he dosent need me on his last album... :'(

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

tl;dr

Jack Trippa 3z company ho

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #25 on: April 22, 2014, 03:05:53 PM »
You are brainwashed. You think it's a natural Progression that kids are turning into poo pounders.
 I don't think music is making kids into homosexuals. I think that people are overly paranoid in that regard.  The people that are gay today were gay long before some rap song made them feel like it was okay.

You don't think the youth emulates what they see and hear on tv and on the radio/net? (adults do as well btw) Where do you think trends/fads come from? Basic research will show the ties between Hollywood and the See Eye Aye. Tv is foremost a societal engineering tool, not an entertainment tool.

There is an agenda In place to faggotize as many people as possible. It's not just some random trend or a form of those darn rebellious kids.
 
What is the end game of "faggotizing" all these people exactly?

Excellent question my friend. It's to destabilize the traditional family unit, which they have been extremely successful at doing, particularly in the black communities. The more this is destabilized, the more dumbed down and dependent people become, hence easier to control.  This is true no matter what race, and is a huge problem in the US.


If there weren't so many fatherless families today, this faggotry would be snuffed out real quick. These young men have zero guidance combined with no moral standard and this is what you get. This has been engineered on purpose.
 
But what's funny is this is the same conversation that it's always been and you're not seeing it. Corporate America has always been a pimp. Like I said, I agree with what Jamar is saying but a lot of it feels like too little, too late. You can't sell your child to prostitution and be mad that the pimp is undermining the moral values you taught them. All the icons of hip-hop for the last 25 years and counting have been working hand-in-hand with corporate America.

If you asked all those angry, older black folks and liberal whites who didn't like gangsta rap, their argument would not sound unlike what you are saying now about all the gay shit and sissy fashion. "It's not about being out of touch. It's about white corporations selling negative images to our kids." This thing has been going on for a long-ass time and the only way it could have really been stomped out was to deal with the whole situation and not just the few problem areas that certain people objected to.


I agree with everything you said in that last paragraph.

To be any sort of player in the entertainment biz, you gotta sell your soul. Now whether you take that statement literally or not is irrelevant. You're basically agreeing to do/say ANYTHING that your bosses tell you no matter how u personally feel about it. That's a sell out, and that's been the name of the game since Hollywood and the entertainment biz started.
 

Jack Trippa 3z company ho

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #26 on: April 22, 2014, 03:19:00 PM »
I'd also like to add to my last statement, they dictate what actors do or say not just in movies/songs, but when they are supposedly out and about not on screen etc. They are full time actors.
 

Hack Wilson - real

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #27 on: April 22, 2014, 03:24:31 PM »
I'd also like to add to my last statement, they dictate what actors do or say not just in movies/songs, but when they are supposedly out and about not on screen etc. They are full time actors.

you can't dictate what musicians do now because they can just put their uncensored work on the internet
 

Sir Petey

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Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #28 on: April 22, 2014, 04:15:48 PM »
krayzy sumwhat



you talk to goddam much, i understand u need an outlet but if you could please keep your posts to a one short paragraph maximum please so we can actually attempt to understand your point of view? when we get hit with that great australian wall of text most of us scroll away as fast as possible. nothing you have to say is that important that it cant be capsized withen four sentances or less. do you need an outlet or something or are you this long winded all day in real life?

no wonder you never get laid...im being serious work on this and your social life will improve if you develop better communications skills. trust
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 04:17:21 PM by Petey Wheatstraw »
 

Hack Wilson - real

Re: Were Lord Jamar's comments discussed here?
« Reply #29 on: April 22, 2014, 06:34:14 PM »
Jack Trippa is dropping gems on ya'll, peep game.



and read Behold a pale horse