Author Topic: the dhamma (buddhism)  (Read 331 times)

Matty

the dhamma (buddhism)
« on: September 11, 2014, 05:06:15 PM »
just came off a retreat and i feel like this stuff is absolutely spot on dead on target as to what's going on. lucky enough to be getting direct transmission and i'm more certain than before that all the answers are all in here, all the way to the end of what's possible. anyone interested in buddhism or want to share some insights? seems like the full teaching hasn't been bubbling as much in recent centuries, but if you can get it, why not go as far as you can? doesn't seem like anything else would be as enriching in this life and living a pantomime certainly isn't going anywhere.

daytondanger

  • Guest
Re: the dhamma (buddhism)
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2014, 03:41:43 AM »
Was it the 10 day Vipassana retreat? The one they claim is the original technique Buddah himself taught?
If so where did you go for it?

I have learnt that technique and it seems effective for increasing ones energy sensitivity.
Also for dissolving "karma", athough it starts accumulating again once you have rid yourself of it.
The most beneficial part of doing the practice was that it heightened my consciousness of what actions/patterns were negative for me.
 

Matty

Re: the dhamma (buddhism)
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2014, 05:26:28 AM »
yo, nah it was a week long one (my second) with a teacher over here in the UK. they have a vipassana retreat but that's not really for people getting started or who are really messy like myself. certainly something to move onto after getting grounded in concentration and doing the more preliminary healing work.

http://theartofmeditation.org/ is the group who run them you can find information on there about the courses/retreats there. i recommend dudes life story book as a starting place, you'd love it. people were coming from all over the world for it, which i think speaks to what's on offer and the word of mouth around this teacher. there's very little on the internet about it but someone summarized things well here

http://www.ttem.org/forum/index.php?topic=1321.0

in terms of direct lineage 'Traditional Theravadan meditation as per the Vissudimagga as taught by Paw Auk Sayadaw'. One of the leading Burmese traditional meditation teachers teaching all of the 40 methods in the compendium compiled in around AD500.  Prior to PAS it was felt in Burma that no one could teach all these methods any more. Burgs is extremely rare in having achieved all the jhanas in all the methods (to put this in context many monks dont manage one jhana in one method) - at the time he was the only layman to have achieved this.'

considered one of the first teachers in several centuries to be able to teach the entire path/purification process, the real deal. so while there's a lot of teaching of the techniques etc, most of it is from text and not experiential. the crazy thing is how highly attained teachers can do mind transmission. shits pretty freaky, like when you're tuned directly into stillness...everything (conscious & subconscious mind) is gone for a moment :o

'He was personally tutored by the Sayadaw, and became the first Westerner to complete the entire series of forty samatha (serenity) meditation practices as described by the Buddha. He showed particular talent with the higher states of samadhi known as the Jhanas and mastered these practices under the Sayadaw’s guidence.'

http://theartofmeditation.org/who-we-are/about-meditation-teacher-burgs/

the 'foundation' retreat covers the basics of concentration (anapana) and introduces a body parts meditation for clearing kammic charge from the base of the body. that part is the real meat and quickly moves into vipassana territory. it's a practice that people can serve people for life. there's also various dhamma discourses w/ transmissions and chi kung practice throughout the week. the core mechanics to the 'mind' or 'consciousness' are mapped out in an easily understandable way. everyone new to it feels they've found something special by the end, even people who've been meditating for years and sometimes decades. the teaching/healing on offer is that deep and profound, incredible stuff.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2014, 08:16:00 AM by Matty »
 

daytondanger

  • Guest
Re: the dhamma (buddhism)
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2014, 07:38:37 AM »
Do you have a link/title for the life story book you mention?
Sounds like something I would enjoy reading.

If you haven't read it before the autobiography of Xu Yun (Empty Cloud) is an interesting read:
http://www.thezensite.com/ZenTeachings/Translations/Empty-Cloud_The_Autobiography_of_Xu_Yun.pdf
He had an extraordinary life and a special spirit to him.

I think the danger of various meditation techniques/spiritual disciplines is that one can become overly self-centered and detached from reality.
As well as seeking spiritual power as some sort of romantic ideal.
 

Matty

Re: the dhamma (buddhism)
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2014, 08:16:15 AM »
Do you have a link/title for the life story book you mention?
Sounds like something I would enjoy reading.

If you haven't read it before the autobiography of Xu Yun (Empty Cloud) is an interesting read:
http://www.thezensite.com/ZenTeachings/Translations/Empty-Cloud_The_Autobiography_of_Xu_Yun.pdf
He had an extraordinary life and a special spirit to him.

I think the danger of various meditation techniques/spiritual disciplines is that one can become overly self-centered and detached from reality.
As well as seeking spiritual power as some sort of romantic ideal.

will check it out 8)

the book is on here, it's the first one 'beyond the veil' http://theartofmeditation.org/library/bookstore/

the thing about those dangers you mentioned is that someone having that experience isn't gonna get anywhere. that's the whole point, that type of mind produces suffering, it's incompatible with progress. you'd never be able to get deeply concentrated. there's no fruit without getting much deeper equanimity to what's going on, engaging with it and letting go of the sense that we're at the centre of things. it's what happens off the cushion that really counts.

some of the biggest healing that happened recently was on the reflection of that, stop being such a burden to others and be more considerate. that it's not about ME and sitting through a lot of anger and frustration, then tears. there was a discourse/transmission on virtue that hit all kinds of spots. same goes for anyone looking for powers instead of just being and loving other beings. it'll be hard to detach from the deeper roots of ego, but true love is a deep compassion, the longing for the happyness of others and not ourselves.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2014, 11:02:34 AM by Matty »
 

daytondanger

  • Guest
Re: the dhamma (buddhism)
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2014, 10:31:50 AM »
Thank you, will check it out when I find some time.

The dangers I mentioned obviously takes you further away from a positive spiritual state but it can be a real trap for people.
Too much spiritual romance in the air these days but not enough people willing to sacrifice themselves and do the hard work that creates a true character with real integrity.

Good thread.
 

Matty

Re: the dhamma (buddhism)
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2014, 08:12:41 AM »
Thank you, will check it out when I find some time.

The dangers I mentioned obviously takes you further away from a positive spiritual state but it can be a real trap for people.
Too much spiritual romance in the air these days but not enough people willing to sacrifice themselves and do the hard work that creates a true character with real integrity.

Good thread.

true it's become a trendy thing with a lot of people freestyling around the subject and in many cases using it to hold up their own ideas/myths about what's going on. that's why i feel this stuff is the real deal, especially from my experience with transmission. there seems to be a dismantling of the idea of ourselves at the deepest levels right from the get go. something that registers at a subconscious level and a choiceless process once the seed has been planted. i coulda been going in circles for a lifetime trying to 'figure' things out had it not been for the directness of teaching from dude. it's a real blessing, there's never a resolution in the mind.