Author Topic: WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)  (Read 181 times)

Damon X Reppin ATL

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WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« on: April 21, 2003, 08:05:42 AM »
WHITE LIKE ME
10 Codes of Ethics for White People in Hip Hop
by J-Love


This is written by a white person, intended for white people who are engaged in the culture of Hip-Hop. It is created in the spirit of personal and collective growth and development for white people who choose to live by the cultural standards of Hip-Hop. White people are talked about a lot within Hip-Hop in terms of who buys the most records, who controls the industry, the white kids in the burbs who go crazy over it, even white artists who have made it despite their whiteness. But rarely is there talk of how white people affect Hip-Hop, and how Hip-Hop affects us. What are the roles and responsibilities of whites involved in this cultural movement? Have we merely self-imposed ourselves into a culture which doesn’t want or need us?

It is time for white folk to stand up and be bold in the dialogue of race and culture, to push the relatively mild interpretations on how and in which way we fit, or don’t fit. Check this 10 point code of ethics for white Hip-Hop heads and see if you can get down with this. Code of Ethics

1. Be aware of your whiteness;
As simple as it may sound, it seems as if many white folks down with Hip-Hop try to avoid the fact that they are white, at all costs. This must stop. Acknowledging your whiteness is an important step in recognizing that regardless of who you are as a person, we come from a lineage steeped in racism and white supremacy. We come from an ancestry of oppression, who’s legacy still lives and breaths in the form of institutionalized racism and countless social and economic injustices. This is what we come from, and that we cannot change. What we can change is what we do about it.

2. Be conscious of your unearned privilege;
We carry around a *backpack of free hook-ups that we have done nothing to earn. From it we extract a set of VIP passes, gold credit cards, universal passports, and blank checks, all of which gives us more power, more open doors, an unfair advantage *(This concept was originated by Peggy Macintosh and is widely used to break down white privilege). Your skin color is an asset in this world. The more you understand this concept that better you will be at negotiating that power and, as much as possible, figuring out a way to end its’ unfairness.

3. Be deliberate in your role as an ally;
An ally means that you participate as a supporter in a movement; you are aware of the ways in which your privilege undermines indigenous leadership, and in understanding that, actively advocates for indigenous leadership ( even if that doesn’t mean you). An ally is someone who lends resources, and who understand their personal goals in the context of a cultural-historical struggle for self determination. White people are allies within hip-hop culture. Let’s work toward leadership that reflects the cultures and communities where it was born. That doesn’t mean that we can’t be active and feel invested in the culture, but we must be aware of how racism plays out in the power paradigm of America, and how it is controlling Hip-Hop culture.

4. Be knowledgeable of the history of the culture;
As with any part of our lives, knowledge, wisdom and understanding are the pillars of self and community enlightenment. It is imperative that you study Hip-Hop culture as you would study your own culture, in order to better understand who you are, where you come from, and where you are going. Precisely because we are coming into a culture that was originated by people of color, it is on us to learn and become knowledgeable of Hip-Hop history.

5. Be open to being educated by others;
When you’re secure about yourself, you’re more open to acknowledging things you don’t know, or have questions about, or ideas that warrant a good discussion. Listen to what other people have to say about Hip-Hop, and be in the mindset of appreciating new or different information from varying sources. The information you know about Hip-Hop is not stagnant. The lessons are infinite.

6. Be open to educating other white folks;
White people don’t always feel like they have an obligation to talk about issues of race and privilege with other white people. However the education and exchange is most critical amongst white people who have the power to create change in the industry and in everyday life. Help white people in power positions to understand the reasons why Hip-Hop exists in the first place; why it’s so important in your life, how it relates, or doesn’t relate to your life experiences. Be confident in your expression of self, and push for the very conversations people try to hide behind.

7. Use your skin privilege to benefit the culture;
In this world because of your whiteness you have access to almost anything, and you didn’t have to do anything to get this access. So use the juice that you have to lend support to the culture, any which way you can. Whether it be connections, money, negotiating with folks that won’t feel as threatened talking to you because you’re white, or becoming a cultural interpreter, whatever is needed to benefit your community.

8. Pay homage to the originators of the culture;
Once you learn the history of Hip-Hop it is your responsibility to speak on it, educate others, and consistently give props where props are due. One reason why some white folks may not want to do this is because it further magnifies the point that they had nothing to do with creating Hip-Hop. Not that white people haven’t contributed to Hip-Hop since its’ birth, but its’ inception was purely melanin related. So when your in your ciphers, whatever that looks like to you, talk history, pay respect to the creators of the culture your living.

9. Don’t think you are the exception to the rule;
YOU ARE NOT THE COOLEST WHITE PERSON IN THE WORLD! (By the way, this code relates to me also) You are not so different and unique as to warrant a special ‘cool white person’ pass. Are you still trying to be the ONLY white person in the crew? Do you feel animosity when other ‘cool’ white kids come around and deflate your ego? Do yourself a favor, instead of trying to diss that other white kid, explaining how they fake or whatever, maybe your should take the time to connect with someone who may be similar in some ways to you. Don‘t push them away or be ashamed, build with them and see them as part of a community within a community.

10. If you can’t abide by the codes, get out;
Nuff said.

It is up to each individual to read and digest this 10 point code of ethics. If you find yourself getting angry, upset, or uncomfortable at what you read, then know that you are in a good space. It’s uncomfortable to look at yourself and deal with the ugly realities of the origination of the ‘isms’ and realize that you are inseparable from them. That your skin symbolizes the color of blood and betrayal for colonized people around the world. Stay in the feeling of dis-comfort, for it is in that very feeling that you will find your truth pushing you toward transformation. This is not about feeling guilty. It is about acknowledgement, acceptance, and action. Take your place in Hip-Hop, but do it with consciousness and integrity, for only then can you really call it your own.

Peace

 

Don Seer

Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2003, 08:55:14 AM »
lol @ rules and regulations.. esp by someone that comes across trying to be whatever the white version of an uncle tom is. look out below.. its super-wigga!

my rules for my fellow white brothers and sisters (:)) are as follows....

1) dont front...
2) dont accept being told what you can or cant do or be... (dont bow
to 'reverse racism' providing you have followed rule 1.)

thats it...
 

·SiNiStEr·

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2003, 08:59:02 AM »
Nah..

just tooo long, make a condensed or abridged version, im white, i dont have the mental stability nor patience to read about black people for more than 3 minutes right??

Who made hip-hop a blacks-only deal..

WHO GIVES A FUCK what color someone is if they got talent..

Eminem #1 artist right now? no?

I have black friends who like eminem just as much as i do and they dont bitch about the fact that he is white. These lil' rules are just a crock o' shit, your full of shit damon, someone ban this kid?
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TheSheriff

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2003, 11:00:05 AM »
Using race as a tool is Machiavellian, and impure. So, no, my code of ethics regarding hip hop goes:

1. Don't matter if they black or white, it's about the music and the attitude.

2. Treat everyone equally.

Dumb article, by one of my honky brothas who's too politically correct to be a man.
 

Suga Foot

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2003, 08:08:44 PM »
In the words of the great Xzibit "You do you"
 

SpecialSam

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2003, 08:21:50 PM »
it doesnt matter what race or color u r... im persian and im like the best rapper here but that dosent mean u should hate and stuff n when i get famous i dont wanna be treated different cus i aint black...peace
 

Primo

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2003, 06:30:06 AM »
1. I am white and i will act ,say, and do whatever i want.
 

Damon X Reppin ATL

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2003, 07:06:28 AM »
Wow, many of you really just don't get the gist of this article, which was written by a Caucasian Hip-Hopper and this article appeared on many "Black" Hip-Hop sites. Most of you either A. Didn't read it, but just made a comment to make a comment B. Can't comprehend the text C. Took it too personal and consider it blasphemous

Also the title is a knock-off of a famous book here in Amerikkka called "Black Like Me" which was written by a Caucasian who took tanning pills, colored his skin and passed himself as a Negro in the early 60's down south to see if Africans and Amerikkkan White World Supremacy do go hand in hand, and he did.............

Again I see the majority of you just don't understand. I guess it really is a Black Thang, hahahahahahahaha
 

Mickaveli_#1

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2003, 07:18:41 AM »
I do disagree with some but others do make sense.

disagree with 7

but agree with 5 & 9
 

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2003, 10:01:01 AM »
damn this man loves writin' essays.....
MC Mass, rep.in' Great Persia and the T Dot Squad:

Docky
Prince Tech
till the day when skies turn black and red water covers the lake/
Great King Kourosh sleep well, cuz all of us IRANIANS are still awake/


 

TheSheriff

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2003, 12:04:41 PM »
Wow, many of you really just don't get the gist of this article, which was written by a Caucasian Hip-Hopper and this article appeared on many "Black" Hip-Hop sites. Most of you either A. Didn't read it, but just made a comment to make a comment B. Can't comprehend the text C. Took it too personal and consider it blasphemous

Also the title is a knock-off of a famous book here in Amerikkka called "Black Like Me" which was written by a Caucasian who took tanning pills, colored his skin and passed himself as a Negro in the early 60's down south to see if Africans and Amerikkkan White World Supremacy do go hand in hand, and he did.............

Again I see the majority of you just don't understand. I guess it really is a Black Thang, hahahahahahahaha

Of course, that's right...
 

Quakaveli

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2003, 12:34:47 PM »
damn this man loves writin' essays.....

no...he just copise n pastes
 

Don Seer

Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2003, 12:39:55 PM »
I do disagree with some but others do make sense.

disagree with 7

but agree with 5 & 9

yup... 7 pisses me off.. especially the money thing...

tell u what.... the others also count for blacks too IMO

« Last Edit: April 22, 2003, 12:40:21 PM by Overseer »
 

Damon X Reppin ATL

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Re:WHITE LIKE ME (In Response To Those Who Just Don't Get It)
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2003, 01:34:12 PM »
I do disagree with some but others do make sense.

disagree with 7

but agree with 5 & 9

yup... 7 pisses me off.. especially the money thing...

tell u what.... the others also count for blacks too IMO



Yea that's true, but for those that known the history of this culture, Africans followed and created these "rules" during the foundation, but when the industry grapped on to it, they just tainted it and you know how money is the root... (lol)