Author Topic: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak  (Read 640 times)

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Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« on: March 17, 2017, 12:20:20 AM »
There's all this talk about the one nation album and so on but all the leaks that came from that were weak, were they not? 
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MOBNigga06

Re: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2017, 12:27:53 AM »
I would agree. The songs are decent, but compared to a lot of his work from that period, it's not that great.

Pac's work on the Makaveli album (and its related tracks) is far superior to his work for One Nation.
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DeeezNuuuts83

Re: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2017, 09:12:04 AM »
It's not bad though.  Frankly it's a nice departure from the typical Pac stuff (which I still prefer but I don't mind rappers experimenting with different styles).  But working with East Coast artists, it's going to have a different feel to it, from the beats to the subject matter. 

What I thought was cool was how a lot of it was almost like them being in a cypher, and they kind of were.  The studio footage shows them all in the booth at the same time together, which Pac usually didn't do, since it seemed like the people who he normally rapped with would lay their verse down later on, maybe because they didn't come up with lyrics as fast as he did.  Off the top of my head, I feel like Teardrops and Closed Caskets was the only track that felt like they all recorded it together in the booth at the same time.
 

mastdark81

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Re: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2017, 02:07:50 PM »
It was definitely weak.  But to their defense was the album ever solidified?  They probably was going to make 20-30 more songs until they came up with an official album.  Half the guys 2pac said would be on it he never got a chance to make a song with yet.  He may have ended up picking 2 songs with Bootcamp but what he was doing was vibing with him.

But back again the songs I've heard was weak for the most part.
 

eyeball

Re: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2017, 02:40:22 PM »
A few points:

We only really heard really rough scratch versions of his tracks and those mainly with BCC, One Nation was to have other artists (Scarface, Goodie MOB, NbN etc) featured that we haven't heard yet.

The BCC tracks sounded like jam sessions that were capturing the moment and most of them don't have anywhere near the commercial vibe and seeing how Suge was all about going platinum it makes no sense that they'd go to retail like that and Pac didn't state this was going to be a mixtape style release.

You can do something grand and unify rap with wack beats and verses.

Now, the two handwritten tracklists by Pac however make it seem like the project was wrapped:

Side A
1. Brothaz in armz
2. World wide piece
3. One Nation
4. Military Minded
5. Set it off
6. Tattoo tearz

Side
7. Fright Night
8. Thug love
9. Make they Jawz tight
10. Neva Call u Bytch
11. Secrets of War
12. Ginseng Power

One Nation tracklist two:
1. Ginseng Power
2. Worldwide Dimez
3. Brotherz N Armz
4. Make they Jaws tite
5. Set it off
6. Secretz of War
7. Never call u bytch
8. Rock that hip hop
9. Tatoo Tearz
10. Fright Night
11. Military Minded
12. Untouchablez

No way those would've ever been pressed and made it to retail, there isn't a hit among em and to come off AEOM and Makaveli to this the whole rap world would've said Pac fell off so I just don't see him going to retail with this mess.

Now consider Too Late Playa with Big Daddy Kane (who also featured on Wherever U R which was never explicitly stated as a One Nation track but I think was), Hammer, Nuttso and co - that was a hit. The project needed tracks like that and I feel that a lot of the DR East talk with old school rappers getting signed in NY was what One Nation expanded into and was going to become as it evolved which would've been an absolutely monumental release that secured DRs presence on the East, bought back a lot of top flight rappers that were languishing in obscurity and made Pac into a next level rapper.

That theory feels right to me and makes a lot more sense as you can see from his history that Pac would take things and then they'd change as they went along with the inspiration and outcome often being very different whilst still carrying the crux of the matter.
 

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Re: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2017, 05:48:47 PM »
you act like these songs were final versions  ::)


 

sofdark

Re: Lets be honest... Pacs work with boot camp was weak
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2017, 08:42:06 PM »
It's not fair to judge the project on what's left because Pac never had time to finish it. The demos were weak like you said.