Author Topic: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex  (Read 888 times)

OmegaRed

E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« on: March 20, 2017, 10:49:30 AM »
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2Relevant

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 12:00:47 PM »
 

DeeezNuuuts83

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 05:43:37 PM »
True, but at least he's saying something.

But with that being said, it's funny how right off the bat, he says people mention Pac's name for attention... pot, meet kettle.

Not that I was expecting him to go superthug on everyone, but while it was a pretty mature response, he more or less said it was okay for everyone to be saying what they were saying (aside from when Flex was openly dissing Pac).  I was hoping he'd at least have said that people need to watch what they say.

Interesting that he said he did meet Wack a few years back.
 

2Relevant

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2017, 06:35:42 AM »
True, but at least he's saying something.

But with that being said, it's funny how right off the bat, he says people mention Pac's name for attention... pot, meet kettle.

Not that I was expecting him to go superthug on everyone, but while it was a pretty mature response, he more or less said it was okay for everyone to be saying what they were saying (aside from when Flex was openly dissing Pac).  I was hoping he'd at least have said that people need to watch what they say.

Interesting that he said he did meet Wack a few years back.

he and the inlawz have done more damage to pacs legacy then anyone else they were supposed to be the thing after pac and pretty much became nothing after pac he knows better then to talk shit i would like to see this fake fat piece of shit get a beat-down for thinking hes something that hes not
 

DeeezNuuuts83

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 10:51:04 AM »
Unfortunately they didn't put Pac's legacy ahead of their own -- they wanted to be stars so bad that they plastered themselves all over Pac releases and took creative control, when they weren't good to begin with and didn't really know how to make a successful project.  Not even Junior Mafia did that, but the few times where they did, sometimes it was needed (remember that Biggie didn't have truckloads of completed songs like Pac, and a lot of it was either rough studio vocals or just one-verse tracks he happen to record) and more often than not, they came correct -- Cease and Kim in particular at least had halfway decent solo careers.

The big problem was that the Outlawz who were close to Pac and Afeni got greedy and took control.  EDI became infatuated with the idea that he was important (hence the "Edidon" name he gave himself), Kastro was Pac's family too and Noble kind of just seemed to fall in line and never create problems.  I hate that Fatal got pushed away for so long (but being signed elsewhere and also locked up didn't help).
 

2Relevant

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2017, 03:51:53 PM »
Unfortunately they didn't put Pac's legacy ahead of their own -- they wanted to be stars so bad that they plastered themselves all over Pac releases and took creative control, when they weren't good to begin with and didn't really know how to make a successful project.  Not even Junior Mafia did that, but the few times where they did, sometimes it was needed (remember that Biggie didn't have truckloads of completed songs like Pac, and a lot of it was either rough studio vocals or just one-verse tracks he happen to record) and more often than not, they came correct -- Cease and Kim in particular at least had halfway decent solo careers.

The big problem was that the Outlawz who were close to Pac and Afeni got greedy and took control.  EDI became infatuated with the idea that he was important (hence the "Edidon" name he gave himself), Kastro was Pac's family too and Noble kind of just seemed to fall in line and never create problems.  I hate that Fatal got pushed away for so long (but being signed elsewhere and also locked up didn't help).

very true then you got those inlawz fans who see the picture different 
 

DeeezNuuuts83

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 09:20:36 PM »
Unfortunately they didn't put Pac's legacy ahead of their own -- they wanted to be stars so bad that they plastered themselves all over Pac releases and took creative control, when they weren't good to begin with and didn't really know how to make a successful project.  Not even Junior Mafia did that, but the few times where they did, sometimes it was needed (remember that Biggie didn't have truckloads of completed songs like Pac, and a lot of it was either rough studio vocals or just one-verse tracks he happen to record) and more often than not, they came correct -- Cease and Kim in particular at least had halfway decent solo careers.

The big problem was that the Outlawz who were close to Pac and Afeni got greedy and took control.  EDI became infatuated with the idea that he was important (hence the "Edidon" name he gave himself), Kastro was Pac's family too and Noble kind of just seemed to fall in line and never create problems.  I hate that Fatal got pushed away for so long (but being signed elsewhere and also locked up didn't help).

very true then you got those inlawz fans who see the picture different 
I'm not worried about those five or six people.

The real Outlawz are long gone, unfortunately.  Pac is dead, Kadafi is dead, Fatal is dead, Mutah is focused on his religion.  I actually met Mutah a few days after Fatal died, really humble, really nice guy... was cool with chatting for a minute but I didn't want to hold him up too long but we took a pic.  I can imagine if it were E.D.I. (not that I'd care to take a picture with his fat ass), he'd probably want to pose either with one hand on his chin or being on his cell phone -- both common cornball pics that he takes a lot.
 

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Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2017, 04:43:24 AM »
Think y'all are being a bit harsh on the outlawz. I've always said I'm one of the few that really favors the remixed albums that came out over the OG's and I thought the outlawz did well for their part.  That Still I Rise album was a classic and it wasn't until Better Dayz that the 2pac albums finally started to lose steam and that was partly because they started using newer acts that didn't know PAC--and partly of course because they finally ran out of material.  (That said even Better Dayz had some great moments)

Anyway the Outlawz were never meant to he great artists.  It's quite different from LBC Crew and Dogg Pound who were appointed by Snoop because of their talent...Outlawz were more meant to be like loyal family that would ride for PAC but not outshine him.  I mean Kadafi is really the key member who kind of had a connection to each member and he was only on cause he was a close cousin of PAC.  Whereas cats that Snoop rolled with were really depended on to enhance the quality of his music.  Sure Daz and Warren had a connection that ran deeper than talent but they had to prove themselves to Dre who is one of the toughest music critics an artist could face.  In fact they don't even consider Warren G worthy of producing for them and Warren G was one of the best ever.

« Last Edit: March 25, 2017, 04:47:44 AM by Infinite Trapped In 1996 »
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MOBNigga06

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2017, 09:13:18 AM »
I know the Lawz are not that great, but I got love for them for life, because they still have a little bit of Pac's spirit in them, they are the strongest ink to Pac still going. Noble matured into a great artist, EDI is about as good as he was in 1992.
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2Relevant

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2017, 03:58:08 PM »
Noble matured into a great artist

lmao what u smoking?
 

DeeezNuuuts83

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2017, 10:52:18 PM »
Think y'all are being a bit harsh on the outlawz. I've always said I'm one of the few that really favors the remixed albums that came out over the OG's and I thought the outlawz did well for their part.  That Still I Rise album was a classic and it wasn't until Better Dayz that the 2pac albums finally started to lose steam and that was partly because they started using newer acts that didn't know PAC--and partly of course because they finally ran out of material.  (That said even Better Dayz had some great moments)

Anyway the Outlawz were never meant to he great artists.  It's quite different from LBC Crew and Dogg Pound who were appointed by Snoop because of their talent...Outlawz were more meant to be like loyal family that would ride for PAC but not outshine him.  I mean Kadafi is really the key member who kind of had a connection to each member and he was only on cause he was a close cousin of PAC.  Whereas cats that Snoop rolled with were really depended on to enhance the quality of his music.  Sure Daz and Warren had a connection that ran deeper than talent but they had to prove themselves to Dre who is one of the toughest music critics an artist could face.  In fact they don't even consider Warren G worthy of producing for them and Warren G was one of the best ever.
I understand that the Outlawz were meant to be Pac's crew and not necessarily the next big act in hip-hop.  I get that people may have had really high expectations for them, particularly after Pac died, but outside of Fatal and Kadafi, they rarely shined even on the OG stuff, but with them being Pac's crew, they kind of used that pass a little too much with how they carried themselves and pushed their careers forward.  E.D.I. and Kastro having creative control over the posthumous material while also being rappers themselves presented a significant conflict of interest, and we saw it time and time again.

The difference between Pac and his own crew (Outlawz) and Snoop and his various crews (Dogg Pound, LBC Crew and Eastsidaz) for the most part was their roots in hip-hop culture.  While Snoop grew up (or at least around) a lot of his crew to some degree, it seems like a lot of them were already into hip-hop on their own and rapped for a while -- you can tell in how they rap and how they flow.  I'm always reminded of a track like Keep It Real Dogg, it basically sounds like a West Coast emcee cypher.  Most of the Outlawz (basically the surviving ones) seem like they only really picked up rap because Pac did, as he was always influential on them.  Fatal rapped on his own well before Pac, which is why his style was so different from his (and light years ahead of the other Outlawz, maybe except for Kadafi, but they rapped together in New Jersey, which maybe explains why they were always the best in the group).  Pac kind of just gave them spots because he wanted to give them an opportunity even if they didn't deserve it or were even good at it, kind of like how Manny Pacquiao basically hires anyone to be in his entourage and do odd jobs.

The Outlawz did a lot more harm than good for Pac musically, unfortunately.  And they don't even know how to defend his legacy 20+ years later.
 

2Relevant

Re: E.D.I. Mean Responds To Wack100, Joey BadAss and Funk Flex
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2017, 06:21:11 AM »
Think y'all are being a bit harsh on the outlawz. I've always said I'm one of the few that really favors the remixed albums that came out over the OG's and I thought the outlawz did well for their part.  That Still I Rise album was a classic and it wasn't until Better Dayz that the 2pac albums finally started to lose steam and that was partly because they started using newer acts that didn't know PAC--and partly of course because they finally ran out of material.  (That said even Better Dayz had some great moments)

Anyway the Outlawz were never meant to he great artists.  It's quite different from LBC Crew and Dogg Pound who were appointed by Snoop because of their talent...Outlawz were more meant to be like loyal family that would ride for PAC but not outshine him.  I mean Kadafi is really the key member who kind of had a connection to each member and he was only on cause he was a close cousin of PAC.  Whereas cats that Snoop rolled with were really depended on to enhance the quality of his music.  Sure Daz and Warren had a connection that ran deeper than talent but they had to prove themselves to Dre who is one of the toughest music critics an artist could face.  In fact they don't even consider Warren G worthy of producing for them and Warren G was one of the best ever.
I understand that the Outlawz were meant to be Pac's crew and not necessarily the next big act in hip-hop.  I get that people may have had really high expectations for them, particularly after Pac died, but outside of Fatal and Kadafi, they rarely shined even on the OG stuff, but with them being Pac's crew, they kind of used that pass a little too much with how they carried themselves and pushed their careers forward.  E.D.I. and Kastro having creative control over the posthumous material while also being rappers themselves presented a significant conflict of interest, and we saw it time and time again.

The difference between Pac and his own crew (Outlawz) and Snoop and his various crews (Dogg Pound, LBC Crew and Eastsidaz) for the most part was their roots in hip-hop culture.  While Snoop grew up (or at least around) a lot of his crew to some degree, it seems like a lot of them were already into hip-hop on their own and rapped for a while -- you can tell in how they rap and how they flow.  I'm always reminded of a track like Keep It Real Dogg, it basically sounds like a West Coast emcee cypher.  Most of the Outlawz (basically the surviving ones) seem like they only really picked up rap because Pac did, as he was always influential on them.  Fatal rapped on his own well before Pac, which is why his style was so different from his (and light years ahead of the other Outlawz, maybe except for Kadafi, but they rapped together in New Jersey, which maybe explains why they were always the best in the group).  Pac kind of just gave them spots because he wanted to give them an opportunity even if they didn't deserve it or were even good at it, kind of like how Manny Pacquiao basically hires anyone to be in his entourage and do odd jobs.

The Outlawz did a lot more harm than good for Pac musically, unfortunately.  And they don't even know how to defend his legacy 20+ years later.

+1