Author Topic: The Defiant Ones (Dr Dre and Jimmy HBO 4 Part Documentary, direct: Allen Hughes)  (Read 7075 times)

The Predator

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Dre's been getting a lot of bad publicity lately, so here's a new doc'.

Look forward to the unseen studio footage of Dre recording and writing with Eazy, N.W.A etc...

Quote
Series Information

Set amid many of the defining events of the past four decades, The Defiant Ones tells the stories of Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre -- one the son of a Brooklyn longshoreman, the other straight out of Compton -- and their improbable partnership and surprising leading roles in a series of transformative events in contemporary culture. From director Allen Hughes (Menace II Society) this revealing, compelling and often-gritty story takes place in recording studios, in humble homes and massive mansions, in criminal courts and in the highest corridors of corporate power.

Hughes shows how decades of defiance and determination helped Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre build a few empires, make a series of American dreams come true and transform two American street kids from different tough neighborhoods into a global force to be reckoned with. This epic look at America shows how you can consistently defy conventional wisdom and even logic, and still win big.

The four-documentary event is told with the help of many of the most notable artists and figures of our time, reflecting Hughes' unfettered access to Iovine, Dre and the remarkable cast of figures who have been a part of their success story. In addition to extensive interviews with Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine, who speak frankly about their highs and lows, the show includes interviews with such music icons as Bono, David Geffen, Eminen, Nas, Ice Cube, Gwen Stefani, Jon Landau, Tom Petty, Trent Reznor, Snoop Dogg, Bruce Springsteen and will.i.am. The series also features never-before-seen footage from a multitude of recording and writing sessions with Eazy-E, JJ Fad, Stevie Nicks, N.W.A., Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen and U2, among others.

The Defiant Ones is a Silverback 5150 Pictures Production in association with Alcon Television Group; executive producers, Allen Hughes, Doug Pray, Andrew Kosove, Broderick Johnson, Laura Lancaster, Jerry Longarzo, Michael Lombardo and Gene Kirkwood; written by Allen Hughes, Lasse Jarvi, Doug Pray; edited by Lasse Jarvi, Doug Pray; music composed by Atticus Ross, Leopold Ross, Claudia Sarne; producer, Steven Williams; directed by Allen Hughes.

Not official trailer -
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/iI6oPhy25zY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/iI6oPhy25zY</a>

Related to the upcoming doc', make of it what you will -

Quote
Simone Green's book 'Time Served: My Days and Nights on Death Row Records' details the tumultuous years.

When HBO was looking for photos to use in The Defiant Ones, a four part documentary series telling the story of Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine that premieres this spring, they reached out to Death Row's former photographer, Simone Green, who wrote a book, Time Served: My Days and Nights on Death Row Records, about her experiences shooting flicks for the iconic label. The veteran photographer, who shot celebrities like Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Leonard, Barry White, Luther Vandross, and Stevie Wonder for Soul Train in the 80s, first met Suge Knight when he was just a gopher running around Solar Records.

But in 1991 when he formed Death Row with Dr. Dre, Suge hired Green, the seasoned professional, to document the burgeoning label in all its glory. While performing her job duties at Death Row, Green had no idea that she was taking pictures that would be so monumental and in demand 25 years later. She didn't know she was in the midst of a scene that would become part of hip-hop's mythology, documenting artists who have become part of pop culture lore. Green recently provided Noisey with commentary on some of her exclusive photos that captured the rise of West Coast gangsta rap in the form of Death Row.



Dre and Suge were ace boon c00ns back then. They were best friends. Dre was like, "I'm going to make this company bigger than anything." And that was what he was doing musically. But musically, what a lot of people don't know, is that Dre took credit for all the songs. He was bad with the music, but he didn't write everything. They didn't give anybody any publishing money. It was like Motown all over again. But Motown with like cayenne pepper in it because no one was getting beat down at Motown.

I worked with Dre most of the time in the middle of the night, working on video shoots. Dre paid good. When you worked for Dre you knew you were fired when you went to pick up your check and there wasn't one for you. Instead of someone calling and saying you're fired, you would go to pick up your check and their wouldn't be one. So then you know you're fired.



That was the last Jack the Rapper event in Florida, and the guys were in the kitchen at the hotel waiting for the people to set up the stage so they could do soundcheck. That was all the little Dogg Pound puppies shooting dice with Snoop that day. Snoop loved me because I was from Detroit. He might have been a gangster, but we never saw that. He was raised in the church, and he was a good guy, and he's never changed from that yet. If Snoop comes to town he's like, "find Simone. I want to see Simone." One time I was in the car and Snoop was up in the hotel and he told me to come up. He has always been very polite.



I commend Michel'le for telling her story. I just think she waited too long. She waited 23 years. I would have put that ass on blast when he whipped my ass. I can't say that I ever saw Dre put his hands on her. I never saw Dre put his hands on nobody. He was so nice to me he was like a son. He always wanted me to make him Buffalo wings. He loved my wings. Tupac was the same way. Loved the chicken wings. Michel'le was also having a relationship with Suge at the same time. I caught them at the office. The only reason that Michel'le is out there like that is because she got people that are mad at Dre to back her. They felt that Dre didn't tell this or Dre didn't tell that. They watered Straight Outta Compton down.



They were having a picnic for Death Row records. Everybody was wearing red. The grandmas, grandkids—everybody was wearing red. We get to the park, and the police have the park surrounded. There were all these different six-fours, and Suge had me take photos of them. I didn't know, but green was a color for Bloods too. If it wasn't red it was green. I had to make five copies of every photo I took and put them in these photo albums that Suge would send into his guys in prison. He would let people know what's going on with Death Row with these photo albums. He would send them in care packages. He was very loyal to those guys in prison.

You could always tell those people that were bullshytters because those were the people that were good ass kissers and they stayed on board. The ones that weren't good ass kissers either got their ass beat or they got killed. One or the other. I'm not a good ass kisser, and I'm not scared of shyt. When I walked into Death Row Records I wasn't scared of Suge. That worked to my benefit because he knew I wasn't scared of him. Most people when they meet Suge they're scared of him. Because his reputation precedes him.



That was the Death Row Christmas party when we were about to sign Mary J. Blige. That was the Christmas affair. Death Row was good at throwing parties at different events. They never held back. I always tried to capture something when I shot photos. I never thought my photos would go down in history as something that was relevant. Back then If you heard Suge's coming to the party you already know that something is going down at the party. If you had a girlfriend and he was mad at you, he was the type to sleep with your girlfriend.



Everybody else in the picture is dead. That's Jake who got killed in Atlanta. The other guy, Buntry, got killed in Suge's car at the gas station. All of those guys are dead. Suge is the only one alive. Those were his cronies. Those cronies were the ones that would have been able to tell who killed Tupac and who killed Biggie. They would have been able to tell, that's why they're not here to tell.

Suge didn't smoke weed or drink at one point. He didn't start making these bad decisions until he started smoking and drinking. All he did was smoke those stank ass cigars. But once he started smoking weed it wasn't a very good look for him. He just didn't know how to decipher between the truth and bullshyt. He bought all of the Death Row employees cars, but we didn't own the car. The company did. So if he got mad at you he would make your car disappear. Suge knows why he's in jail. He's not in jail for just running that guy over. He's in jail for everything he's done.



Suge was always in competition with Dre. If Dre went and got a bushel of apples, then Suge wanted a bushel of apples. And he wanted the exact same apples because he wanted to make it seem like he was equal, and really he wasn't. Because Dre was the creative mind. Suge might have been the muscle, but he wasn't a producer. He couldn't produce a record. I don't care how much he tried, he would never be able to produce a record. He could play like he produced the record, but we knew better. I respect the fact that I learned a lot at Death Row Records. I continue to earn because of Death Row Records. But if you don't know the music business you will be pimped just like a ho on the street. I kept it just like it was, he was my boss and that was how it was going to be.

When the incident happened at the Death Row offices with me I had no idea that Suge was going to have me assaulted. It happened in 1995 before the Super Bowl. He was blowing up my beeper, and by the time I got to the office I was like, "what's up?" Suge didn't like snitches, but if it was something to do with him, he wanted you to snitch and tell him. He asked me about who was in the studio one night, and I told him I didn't know. He's sneaky. He does shyt and you have no idea he's doing it.

He asked me what I had in my hand and it was a pencil. He told me to give him the pencil, and when I did this girl swung on me. I fell down. Got up, kicked Suge in the nuts, and ran into the ladies bathroom. The secretary from Interscope was in the bathroom, and she was like, "oh my God!" She panicked. She could hear Suge and David Kenner banging on the bathroom door. She said, "don't say a word. When I go out I'll say nobody's in there." I hid in the bathroom and ended up sneaking down a couple of floors and taking the elevator to the parking garage so I could leave.

They had someone waiting in the garage for me to let me know I had five minutes to get off Death Row property or they were going to have me killed. I got my ass up out of there. And if my dad was still alive Suge wouldn't be in jail. He would have been dead a long time ago. I wrote the book because I didn't want to hold inside what happened to me. I knew if I held it all inside it would affect me later. My book is self-published and people in the jail system have bought that book. Its unbelievable. We get order after order from people from the prisons. The book has done very well for me.





« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 07:07:15 AM by The Predator »
 
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Okka

I'll check this when it comes out.
 

sofdark

This is off topic but do you guys remember the name of the book by an Aftermath studio guy that worked heavily with Dre? He talks about behind the scene situations and about how 50 and Game beef started etc.
 

U.N.T.O.U.C.H.A.B.L.E.

^^you mean chris "the glove"taylor?^^

Jay Wallace

This is off topic but do you guys remember the name of the book by an Aftermath studio guy that worked heavily with Dre? He talks about behind the scene situations and about how 50 and Game beef started etc.
  Are you referring to the book written by Bruce Williams?  He wasn't an Aftermath studio guy.  He was Dre's right hand from his days at Death Row until about 2007.  This may be the book you're talking about....

https://www.amazon.com/Rollin-Dre-Unauthorized-Account-Insiders/dp/0345498224/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492970103&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=bruce+williams+rolling+with+dre

 
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Jay Wallace

Quote


Suge was always in competition with Dre. If Dre went and got a bushel of apples, then Suge wanted a bushel of apples. And he wanted the exact same apples because he wanted to make it seem like he was equal, and really he wasn't. Because Dre was the creative mind. Suge might have been the muscle, but he wasn't a producer. He couldn't produce a record. I don't care how much he tried, he would never be able to produce a record. He could play like he produced the record, but we knew better. I respect the fact that I learned a lot at Death Row Records. I continue to earn because of Death Row Records. But if you don't know the music business you will be pimped just like a ho on the street. I kept it just like it was, he was my boss and that was how it was going to be.
 

This seemed like the general consensus among studio people when it came to Suge.  It struck me as interesting that he'd downplay Dre as the concoction of behind-the-scenes uncredited ghost writers and ghost producers who were the real talent yet when Dre got shook from the spot, the quality control went right out the window.  You had Pac who was a brilliant artist, perhaps the greatest of his generation, yet the albums never fit what they once were.  They still had guys who could make beats but they didn't seem to have anyone who could produce albums.
 

The Predator

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<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/H-pljm10AOY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/H-pljm10AOY</a>
 

The Predator

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<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2HlKqILwbSg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2HlKqILwbSg</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/pcZUnxecf20" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/pcZUnxecf20</a>
 

dexter

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I'll check this when it comes out.
ditto
 

me1

dee barnes makes a cameo which i think is a great sign if you're like me and you're worried you wont learn shit from watching this...

hope they touch on dre's vault, anxiety, fear of tarnishing his legacy, the scrapped detox joints from 2004-2015, etc.
 

Sccit

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is this hbo only or will it be on netflix/hulu
 

me1

is this hbo only or will it be on netflix/hulu

hbo only out the gate looks like

FYI each episode airs over four consecutive days (July 9-12). Plus all four available on hbogo right out the gate just after the first one airs, I beloeve
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 06:49:15 PM by manny1 »
 

sofdark

This is off topic but do you guys remember the name of the book by an Aftermath studio guy that worked heavily with Dre? He talks about behind the scene situations and about how 50 and Game beef started etc.
  Are you referring to the book written by Bruce Williams?  He wasn't an Aftermath studio guy.  He was Dre's right hand from his days at Death Row until about 2007.  This may be the book you're talking about....

https://www.amazon.com/Rollin-Dre-Unauthorized-Account-Insiders/dp/0345498224/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492970103&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=bruce+williams+rolling+with+dre

I think this is it. Thanks G.
 

The Predator

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Dre not speaking anymore after this doc', according to Jim -

(Jimmy I on Stern show)
http://www7.zippyshare.com/v/LYKQ1rkN/file.html
 

gio™fugahoo

 If any streams of episode 1 floating around it would be nice if someone post a link ?!?!?
 

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<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ggRsy1Aeq8U" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ggRsy1Aeq8U</a>
 

me1

Couple stand out moments for me:

Suge/Dionne Warwick story (episode 3)

Cube's spot on but totally foul impersonation of DOC from that old Pump It Up episode

The fact detox is NEVER coming out but I bet a lot of money there will be more artists Dre produces that blow to the scale Fif, Em, Snoop, Kendrick have. Man's commitment is wild

The nature of DOC/Dre relationship. That DOC filled that little brother void left by Tyree after his passing
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 09:07:14 AM by manny1 »
 

gio™fugahoo

Thanxxx @ The Predator 👍👍👍

 I just took four hours off to watch all four episodes  and it didn't feel like four hours that's when you know it's good I'm entertained
was really nice to watch
 

Dogg Ly Dogg

I didnt have the time to watch all 4 episodes but first one was coo but Jimmy Iovines part was way better imo because I've learn a lot about him and we all know Dre's story at this point
 

Blood$

I peeped the first part last night and thought it was dope, looking forward to watching the rest this week
 

The Predator

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The Defiant Ones

Review

July 7, 2017

If you sent only the music of Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre into outer space, alien cultures would still have a pretty good picture of the American industry over the last four decades. Premiering this Sunday on HBO, and then airing over the next three nights, “The Defiant Ones” covers the arc of both men, devoting the first two episodes (of four) to their careers before they met and the second two to how music changed when they united their formidable talents. The documentary, directed and co-written by Allen Hughes, has elements of fan service—negative aspects of either gentleman’s personal or professional lives often feel rushed—but it makes the case that this pair deserves carving on the Mt. Rushmore of the music industry. And while the documentary falls into the trap of a talking-head structure, these are some damn impressive heads. Basically, everyone that Iovine and Dre have worked with over the years appears to discuss their legacy and importance to the industry. Pay attention, Earthlings.

Hughes was not only granted access to Iovine and Dre over a three-year period, he assembled a Hall of Fame list of interview subjects to discuss working with the men. The result is a project that feels like it has weight instead of merely a fan letter to a couple legends. Rock icons like Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, Bono, Patti Smith and Stevie Nicks discuss their collaborations with Iovine; rap masters like Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, Eminem and Kendrick Lamar pay homage to Dre. And all of them have interesting stories to tell. In a sense, “The Defiant Ones” is a four-hour Hall of Fame presentation, making clear how much Iovine and Dre have not just been a part of the industry but shaped it and changed it forever.

Personally, I love anecdotes that illustrate the ripple effect of creativity. How does “Born to Run” lead to “Because the Night,” which leads to “Refugee”? How did “Rico Suave” change the music industry? Did a paintball gun really inspire “Fuck the Police”? How did the rap industry survive the death of Tupac? What happened after streaming music became the norm? Stories about the first time that Dre heard Snoop Dogg or his first meeting with Eminem are simply the kind of thing I love hearing—there’s something about those seemingly fateful moments in music history that make for good television, especially for those of us old enough to have seen all of this take place.

There are times when the chronological format that jumps from Iovine to Dre even before they knew each other feels like it hampers the piece. In one case, the show jumps from the car accident that destroyed the voice of The D.O.C. of N.W.A. fame back to the relationship status between Iovine and Nicks and I almost got whiplash. And while the show doesn’t shy away from the dark chapters of their lives—in one of the most interesting, Dee Barnes discusses the assault on her by Dre, and he admits to considering it a blemish on who he is as a man—it always moves quickly back to success. In the fourth chapter, Iovine discusses how horses have to have blinders on so they don’t see the competition, suggesting that successful people need to do the same. “The Defiant Ones” follows this model as well, never even mentioning an act that Iovine or Dre didn’t work with, when it would have been nice to give the gentlemen some context within the bigger picture of the music industry. And the production can sometimes get a little overheated, never more so than in in a segment that parallels the controversies between Tupac Shakur and Marilyn Manson in a way that feels forced.

“The Defiant Ones” stumbles most in the final half-hour, which often feels like a commercial for Beats headphones, the latest mega-success for Iovine and Dre. Although, by that point, I didn’t really care because I had heard so many interesting stories over the previous three-and-a-half episodes. Most of all, I was allowed insight into two men who lived up to the adjective in the title of this show. Every time, Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre were told something wouldn’t work or they couldn’t do something, they defied traditional thinking about the music industry, and changed it forever. They’re not just producers. They’re not just businessmen. They didn’t just follow the current, they changed the flow of the stream. It's a reminder that our true visionaries don’t follow a template; they make a new one.

Brian Tallerico
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 05:13:46 PM by The Predator »
 

me1

forgot to mention that Dre's comments about Suge's incident on the SOC set were also a highlight for me. don't want to ruin that surprise.

super dope from beginning to end. must watch for anyone reading this.
 

Okka

I can't wait to check this out.
 

Don Seer


first two parts down, 3rd next :)

accidentally watched part 2, then part 1.. wasn't fatal.. lol
 

Blood$

Cube's spot on but totally foul impersonation of DOC from that old Pump It Up episode

yo when I saw that my job dropped lmao cold blooded

I figured he never dissed D.O.C. during that time period but I guess that was the one shot  :laugh: