Author Topic: All Eyez on Me Reviews  (Read 2396 times)

The Predator

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2916
  • Thanked: 33 times
  • Karma: 326
  • Bow Wow Wow, Yippy Yo Yippy Yew
All Eyez on Me Reviews
« on: June 16, 2017, 04:21:13 PM »
 25% on RT so far.

Quote
All Eyez on Me 

Nick Allen
June 16, 2017   

“All Eyez on Me” is one of the most useless music biopics ever made—it’ll be too confusing for newcomers and too underwhelming for those familiar with the work and the life of rap prophet Tupac Shakur. Directed by Benny Boom with minuscule passion and a ruthless 140-minute running time, “All Eyez on Me” is a production that coasts on the bare minimum of biopic requirements, boasting a lead who looks very much like Tupac but nothing that can’t be learned from a Wikipedia page, or better yet, the 2003 documentary “Tupac: Resurrection.” As it merely seeks to canonize a complex figure who was far more interesting than perfection, “All Eyez on Me” dehumanizes an important man. 

There are so many fascinating parts to Tupac’s 25 years on Earth: his upbringing in a family of Black Panthers and mostly women; his young interest in acting and Shakespeare; his ascent in the pop charts as a no-holds-barred storyteller; and, of course, the debate about the merit of his obscene lyrics, especially in regards to treatment of women and animosity towards the police. Boom’s film overzealously hits all of these (unless it’s something that makes Tupac look bad) and compiles them like a greatest hits collection that only features the simple choruses and never the contemplative verses. Moments are flattened, diced and spoken through cliches, like when Tupac defends his teen pregnancy song “Brenda’s Got a Baby” to a couple of white record executives, or when he later realizes that because the world is watching him closely, he should name his album … well, you get it. As the editing leaps from one Important Moment to the next, the timeline becomes confusing and bold-faced, underlined emotions never resonate.

There is no air in this movie—the kind of air that turns faces on the big screen into our thoughtful surrogates, regardless as to whether the character is fictional or not. Demetrius Shipp Jr.’s invested performance of Tupac is reduced to an impersonation, and an essential part of the rapper is underestimated: his mind. This version of Tupac is always doing, in service of presenting all that he did but not so much what was going on on the inside. Aside from hammy moments in which he surveys a concert crowd with a bright spotlight on him, he’s rarely shown simply thinking, considering. Even when the narrative framing device of an interview in prison creates exposition out of Tupac debating himself with his interviewee, it’s pithy and cheap.

“All Eyez on Me”’s most accomplished factor might be its third act, in which Tupac joins Death Row Records and signs a deal with the devilish Suge Knight (Dominic L. Santana). It functions like a tacky gangster movie of heavy glares and heated confrontations, all while leaning heavily on the “Julius Caesar”-esque elements of Tupac’s last months. But Boom's lifeless direction still taunts, like when we have to watch Shipp lip-sync to Tupac songs for ten minutes or so during a concert, or watch numerous macho confrontations play out with the camerawork of soap operas.

Although the movie is wholly allergic to nuance, there is some shred of an emotional arc that arises with the relationship Tupac has with his mother, Afeni Shakur (Danai Gurira). She appears throughout the movie as a force that challenges Tupac in one way or the other. Gurira too has to work with rotten dialogue and cliche situations, but it’s the one glimmer that feels like an expression instead of a duplication.

For everyone else, including Tupac, Boom’s biopic is more concerned with information than humanity, and eventually Boom’s shallow dedication to showing us recognizable moments or outfits becomes plainly goofy. I especially loved the man who played Snoop Dogg and then lip-synced his dialogue with that of the real Snoop’s voice (or it sounded very much like it). The soundtrack soon enough elicits more giggles than head bobs, with the movie cramming in as many songs as possible, despite having no problem skipping around a short career timeline from album to album, underestimating the creation of such pivotal songs in the process.

Boom’s counterproductive answer to the flawed aspects of Tupac is to deny that very complexity and to make him a type of savior, which often makes “All Eyez on Me” only plainly terrible. However, that defiance of ambiguity becomes mortifying and offensive when Boom contextualizes a controversial sexual assault case—the before, during, and after—within a biopic’s fact, in which the survivor is shown intimately dancing with Tupac to R. Kelly’s “Bump & Grind” nights before, and Tupac is presented as sleeping in a different room when she was gang-raped by men he claimed to barely know. Boom even has the audacity to speak for the woman after Tupac was sentenced, when he cuts to her celebrating with her lawyer and then smirking at Tupac. Juxtaposed with the movie’s walking butt close-up establishing shots and the way that women are plainly either mother figures or sexual objects, it’s enough to make you throw up.

For whatever Boom and his collaborators may know about Tupac, especially as they present “the untold story” (to reference marketing), it’s clear with their narrative agenda and values that they’re looking far past what makes Tupac so important. This is a man whose life deserves scrutiny, to explore the many issues that he faced as a young black male artist making record history with a bold definition of Thug Life and a fiery ego that clashed with his self-proclaimed sensitivity. Even more, the story of Tupac is one that deserves true artistry. A Tupac film needs to match the vigor you feel in his freight-train rapping, which did more than just tell you what to think. It allowed you to see his world for yourself.

Quote
All Eyez on Me

Review by Edward Douglas
Movie Review / 15 Jun 2017
All Eyez on Me Review

This Tupac Shakur biopic may be appreciated more by his fans than by newbies.

By Edward Douglas The legacy of Tupac (or 2Pac) Shakur has been kept alive for more than twenty years since his death, and the long-awaited biopic All Eyez on Me tries hard to separate the controversy from the contradictions in a movie that gets better over its lengthy runtime.

Prestigious filmmakers like Antoine Fuqua and John Singleton had originally hoped to make the movie, before it got bogged down in years of legal disputes, so the fact this movie even exists is quite remarkable. The producers finally ended up hiring Benny Boom, a director better known for his music videos--most notably for Nicki Minaj, 50 Cent and Akon--than his movies, and he does a decent job trying to encapsulate the life of a complicated artist.

The main reason his movie gets off to such a rough start is the decision to use the lame framing device of Shakur (played by Demetrius Shipp, Jr.) being interviewed during his 1995 prison sentence, and reflecting back on his life and career up until that point. This immediately gives the film’s first half a far-too overused biopic narrative that rambles through Shakur’s early life like a Wikipedia entry.

At times, the early part of the film feels more like a TV movie, not being particularly subtle about depicting the white people around Shakur as either clueless (such as his Interscope Records liaisons) or downright evil (just about every police officer shown in the movie).


Once the story catches up to Shakur in prison and the last two years of his life, things start to get far more interesting, particularly with his controversial involvement with Death Row Records head Suge Knight, as played by Dominic Santana. This is also when it starts to veer away from depicting Shakur as a baby-faced angel, never to blame for his troubles or the violence that follows him everywhere.

Granted, Benny Boom has a hard act to follow in the 2015 NWA movie Straight Outta Compton and even the 2009 Biggie Smalls movie Notorious. Comparisons will invariably be made to both, having so many characters in common, but it isn’t really fair, since All Eyez on Me is as different a movie as Tupac was as an artist from NWA. This is a film about a creative individual trying to deal with constant adversity, rather than a group of rappers who would inevitably butt heads.

Newcomer Demetrius Shipp, Jr. has the unenviable task of representing Shakur—a role played by Anthony Mackie in Notorious. Shipp not only looks eerily like the late rapper when recreating music videos or his acting roles, but he’s also able to perfectly mimic his mannerisms and way of delivering a phrase. This makes his performance feel like more than just an impression and makes you feel as if you’re watching his real life with its ups and downs.

The rest of the cast isn’t quite as strong with Danai Gurira (The Walking Dead, Black Panther) as Tupac’s mother Afeni giving an overwrought performance that pales in comparison to Naomie Harris’s similar role in Moonlight. Her character also disappears for a good chunk of the movie, negating the myth about Tupac’s closeness with his mother. In some ways, it’s more entertaining to watch Shakur interact with childhood friend Jada Pinkett (Kat Graham) over a few key points in their respective careers.

At times, the movie does presume the viewer knows at least a little about Shakur’s life and career, or at least his dealings with Knight and the famed East Coast/West Coast feud with P. Diddy’s Bad Boy Records. That may also be necessary to fully understand what’s happening in the film’s second half. If nothing else, the movie should allow you to fully appreciate the dichotomies within Shakur and his music.

The Verdict

You may need to already have at least a tangential interest in Tupac Shakur in order to appreciate All Eyez on Me, because it starts off in such a traditional way and rather meekly. For non-fans, it might be tough to get through the movie’s first hour and to the “good stuff” contained in the second half. On the other hand, Demetrius Shipp Jr. gives it his all with an impressive performance that’s far more than just an impression. It’s doubtful Shakur’s fans will feel like they wasted their time by watching this movie.

Good
The Tupac Shakur biopic All Eyez on Me may be appreciated more by his fans than by newbies.
 

Blood$

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2017, 04:23:51 PM »
I saw it today, I wasn't blown away by it but overall I did enjoy it  8)

Straight Outta Compton > All Eyez On Me > Notorious
 

Jay Wallace

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2017, 06:15:43 PM »
I liked it more than Notorious but that's not saying much.  It lacked a cohesive vision and a coherent story.  It felt like there were way too many people involved in making it.  I was really disappointed by it.
 

The Predator

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2916
  • Thanked: 33 times
  • Karma: 326
  • Bow Wow Wow, Yippy Yo Yippy Yew
Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2017, 03:06:56 AM »
Quote
Critics Consensus: Despite Demetrius Shipp Jr.'s fine lead performance, All Eyez on Me is mostly a surface-skimming, by-the-numbers biopic of a larger-than-life icon.

Quote
'All Eyez On Me' Leaves Out Some Major 2Pac Stories

The Manhattan screening of All Eyez On Me, one week before the film’s debut, has an eerie tinge. This viewing for media and tastemakers is taking place at Magno Screening Room, a facility located just three doors down from Quad Recording Studios, where Tupac Shakur famously survived five bullet wounds in 1994. It’s a geotag that adds some realism to a mostly true-to-life biopic that features a convincing performance of the fabled rapper via newcomer actor Demetrius Shipp Jr., and an outstanding portrayal of Afeni Shakur by Danai Gurira (best known for playing Michonne on The Walking Dead).

All Eyez On Me is a thorough look at the life of hip-hop’s most iconic figure. The Benny Boom-directed movie packs 25 years of pain, triumph, poetry, thug life, controversy, and cultural domination into two hours and 20 minutes of cinema. It’s ambitious in scope, but still, several of the moments that added to 'Pac’s legend (i.e. spitting at news reporters) are curiously left out. With All Eyez On Me in theaters today, Complex sifted through the film to find the most glaring exclusions.

Filming Poetic Justice

While Juice, Above the Rim and Gridlock’d are all accounted for in All Eyez On Me, Tupac’s principled loverboy role in 1993’s Poetic Justice—and all of its off-camera drama—is conspicuously absent. As reports tell it, co-star Janet Jackson asked that the actor/rapper take an HIV test before they filmed a kissing scene, a request that Pac vehemently denied. (Director John Singleton told Vibe in 2011 that it was a contrived publicity stunt.) Elsewhere on set, an extra reportedly trolled the movie star by calling him “Four Pac”; afterward, Maya Angelou lectured Tupac to tears.

The Storied Clash With the Hughes Brothers

Tupac was originally cast to appear in the 1993 classic Menace II Society, but was fired for causing problems on set. The dismissal reportedly led to a fight between Tupac and directors Allen and Albert Hughes. Tupac proudly confessed to the altercation on a 1994 episode of Yo! MTV Raps. “They fired me, but did it in a roundabout punk snitch way,” Pac said, heated. “So I caught them on the streets and beat they behind.” The music video show’s footage was later subpoenaed and used to sentence Pac to 15 days in jail for the assault—although the twin directors remember it differently. “It was me and 12 Crips that he got to jump me,” Allen Hughes told Vibe in 2009. “He didn’t do shit.” Either way, the incident is left out of All Eyez On Me.

His Time Dating the Queen Of Pop

Now the stuff of hip-hop mythology, Tupac Shakur and Madonna were once romantically involved, a point that is overlooked in the biopic. The megastar singer/actress opened up about their relationship during a 2015 interview with Howard Stern. “One time, I was mad at [Letterman] when I said the f-word a lot—I was in a weird mood that day,” Madonna said. “I was dating Tupac Shakur at the time and the thing is he got me all riled up on life in general.” Pac’s friend and actress Rosie Perez later admitted to hooking the two celebrities up at the 1993 Soul Train Music Awards.

The Uncanny Rhyme He Recorded Before Being Shot at Quad Studios

Prior to the infamous Quad Studios shooting, Tupac laid one of his most clairvoyant 16s—and it’s completely omitted from All Eyez On Me. The cash-strapped MC dropped a free verse for DJ Ron G in Harlem hours before he was shot, but the session was cinematic in its own right. Ron remembers that Pac seemed stressed as he was fielding phone calls about his whereabouts. When Pac finally laid his rhyme, which would later grace the posthumous Big L collaboration “Deadly Combination,” his verse suggested paranoia: “I think niggas is tryin' to kill me/Picturin' pistols, spittin' hollow points 'til they drill me.” It’d be the perfect prelude to a pivotal scene that changed everything, but the session didn’t make it into the script.

His Marriage to Keisha Morris

The man who made “I Get Around” tried to settle down while he was locked up. In 1995, Pac married his girlfriend Keisha Morris at New York’s Clinton Correctional Facility; Morris told The Source in 2000 that it was a loving, but partially strategic move intended to better allow her to handle the rapper’s business matters. While the union was brief—they divorced the following year—it was eventful (their hotel room once caught fire). But it’s not surprising that the marriage is altogether overlooked in All Eyez On Me, as Morris has rarely done press after being unhappy with her depiction in the 2003 documentary Tupac: Resurrection.

The Full Scope of the East Coast/West Coast Beef


While Biggie and ‘Pac—and to a broader extent Death Row and Bad Boy Records—are clearly pitted against each other, the film doesn’t depict the totality of the media-fueled East Coast-West Coast rivalry. You don’t see Tupac trading shots with Mobb Deep or Jay Z (“Chino XL, fuck you too!”), or eventually squashing his beef with Nas in Central Park after the 1996 MTV VMAs. And there’s no reproduction of the “Hit Em Up” music video (casting a phony version of Gravy, who is already a phony version of Big, to mock Big, would be way too meta). It’s all likely an artistic choice out of respect for the beef’s tragic outcome or as not to overshadow the significance of Tupac’s life, but the direction reeks of Hollywood shellac.

His Rigorous Studio Work Ethic

All Eyez On Me pictures Pac’s perfectionism in a scene in which he obsesses over the mixing of his debut solo single, “Brenda’s Got a Baby.” But the prolific recording process that provided enough material for seven posthumous albums goes unexplored. It would’ve been interesting to witness a recreation of Tupac’s diligence in the studio—the work ethic of a man who knew his days were numbered.




Quote
50 Cent Calls 2Pac Biopic 'All Eyez on Me' Trash: 'Catch That Sh*t on a Fire Stick'

Earlier today, Jada Pinkett-Smith hopped on Twitter to share her disappointment in the portrayal of her friendship with 2Pac in All Eyez on Me, the new biopic on 'Pac's life that hit theaters today. "My relationship to Pac is too precious to me for the scenes in All Eyez On Me to stand as truth," she tweeted, calling "the reimagining" of her relationship to 'Pac "deeply hurtful." She wasn't the only celebrity to voice her displeasure as 50 Cent took to his Instagram account to critique the movie as well.

"Man I watched the 2Pac film," he posted, "that was some bullshit. Catch that shit on a fire stick," 50 said, referring to Amazon's Fire Stick device that's been used by many to illegally stream movies to their TVs.

In a second post on Instagram, Fif elaborated on why he was feeling some type of way about All Eyez on Me. "I'm a big 2Pac fan," he began. "I just don't think his story was done well; he deserved better.

"The shit felt like I was watching a Lifetime TV movie in a theater," 50 continued. "I wanted to change the channel. The New Edition story was better then that shit."

At the time of this writing, All Eyez on Me has a 27 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, with a 42 on Metacritic. Despite those scores, experts are pegging All Eyez on Me to end up in the No. 2 spot in this weekend's box office behind Cars 3, which also hits theaters today, and right ahead of Wonder Woman, which rode the No. 1 spot for the last two weeks.

Quote
Jada Pinkett Smith Says 'All Eyez On Me' Is "Deeply Hurtful"

Friday marks what would have been 2Pac's 46th birthday. The release of All Eyez on Me, the long-awaited Tupac Shakur biopic, coincides with this celebratory day for fans and is garnering mixed reviews.

    Bring in #TupacDay by hitting the theaters for #AllEyezOnMe! In theaters now! https://t.co/8MV1v8i4ao https://t.co/8lfqner9Jo
    — All Eyez On Me (@alleyezmovie) June 16, 2017

Known 2Pac friend Jada Pinkett Smith, portrayed in the film by Kat Graham, criticized the film's handling of their relationship in a series of tweets Friday. According to Smith, the film's "reimagining" contains multiple "hurtful" inaccuracies.

"Forgive me... my relationship to Pac is too precious to me for the scenes in All Eyez On Me to stand as truth," Smith said in a series of tweets Friday. "Pac never read me that poem. I didn't know that poem existed until it was printed in his book. Pac never said goodbye to me before leaving for LA. He had to leave abruptly and it wasn't to pursue his career. I've never been to any of Pac's shows by his request. We never had an argument backstage. The reimagining of my relationship to Pac has been deeply hurtful."

Smith also mentioned Graham and star Demetrius Shipp Jr., thanking them for their performances. "This is no fault of yours," she said. "Thank you for bringing so much heart and spirit to your roles. You both did a beautiful job with what you were given." Smith closed out her tweetstorm with a happy birthday message for 2Pac. Read the tweets in full below.

    Forgive me... my relationship to Pac is too precious to me for the scenes in All Eyez On Me to stand as truth.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    Pac never read me that poem. I didn't know that poem existed until it was printed in his book.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    Pac never said goodbye to me before leaving for LA. He had to leave abruptly and it wasn't to pursue his career.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    I've never been to any of Pac's shows by his request. We never had an argument backstage.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    The reimagining of my relationship to Pac has been deeply hurtful.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    To @KatGraham and @Dshippjr this is no fault of yours. Thank you for bringing so much heart and spirit to your roles.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    You both did a beautiful job with what you were given. Thank you both.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

    Happy birthday Pac, you are cradled in my heart for eternity.
    I love you.
    — Jada Pinkett Smith (@jadapsmith) June 16, 2017

In an interview with Vanity Fair Tuesday, Graham addressed previous criticism from John Singleton. The director was originally set to helm the 2Pac biopic, but exited the project due to alleged "major creative differences" in 2015. In an interview in 2016, Singleton said he knew the film had been "fucked up" and would thus receive no attention from him.

"John's a personal friend of mine, but I haven't talked to him about it," Graham said this week. "I don't know that he's seen it yet. I know he hadn't seen it at the time he made those comments. It's so fucking hard to make a black biopic. It is fucking hard to get the money, and if it's based on a musician, to get the clearance together. It's so hard to make a movie period, let alone one that features as much diversity as this film."

All Eyez on Me is in theaters now.




« Last Edit: June 17, 2017, 03:19:08 AM by The Predator »
 

smp4life

  • Muthafuckin' Double OG
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 523
  • Karma: 1
  • cyber-punk!
Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2017, 08:22:35 AM »
Saw it yesterday. Shit was boring.

The Predator

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2916
  • Thanked: 33 times
  • Karma: 326
  • Bow Wow Wow, Yippy Yo Yippy Yew
Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2017, 03:47:27 PM »
Quote
The epic-length ALL EYEZ ON ME fails to capture the complexities, essence of 2Pac!!!


"Capone"
June 16, 2017

Beginning with 2009’s NOTORIOUS (about The Notorious B.I.G.) and continuing in 2015’s STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON (a biopic about N.W.A), the movie world has slowly been building a unusual type of cinematic universe that seems to have the common element of featuring people who have had dealings with or worked for Death Row Records and its infamous leader Suge Knight. And while Compton featured a character (Dr. Dre) who worked for the label briefly, the new film, ALL EYEZ ON ME, throws the spotlight on its biggest artist, Tupac Shakur. Thankfully, the film doesn’t limit itself to that relatively brief time in Shakur’s life and career, but it’s interesting watching the pieces fit together.

Unlike most other music biopics that focus on a particularly interesting or productive period in an artist’s career, ALL EYEZ ON ME is a cradle-to-grave telling of Tupac’s life—from being the son of a Black Panther leader to his brutal slaying in Las Vegas—with newcomer (and dead-on look alike) Demetrius Shipp Jr. taking on the lead role. Shipp is called up to illustrate many variations of Shakur’s persona, from enthusiastic acting student in school, to sensitive young poet, to disappointed son when his mother Afeni (Danai Gurira, best known as Michonne in “The Walking Dead”) pulls him out of school to move to California, to voice of his generation, to promising film actor, to an enraged paranoid who believed his friends out to rip him off or worse. It’s a startling performance that is unfortunately couched in a screenplay that only skims the surface of what made Tupac so interesting and compelling.

Among the array of interesting actors in the film is “The Vampire Diaries” star Kat Graham as Tupac’s longtime friend Jada Pinkett. The two had known each other since attending a performing arts high school together in Baltimore, and kept in touch as both of their careers took off. As the film portrays things, she was a grounding force in his life, but even she couldn’t stop the inevitable from happening. The handful of scene Shipp and Graham have together are among the film’s best because they’re about more than just the success and fame; they’re about Tupac remembering the things that used to be important in his life. The burden of being the voice of his generation was destroying those things. It is noteworthy to mention that Jada Pinkett is not at all thrilled about her portrayal in the film, calling it “deeply hurtful” in a series of tweets.

But so much of what surrounds those scenes is like a highlights reel—being exposed to the militant voice of the Black Panthers, his time in the Digital Underground, being signed to Interscope Records and feeling like he wasn’t getting any money, which led to his jumping ship to Death Row after Suge Knight (Dominic L. Santana), who is wisely portrayed as both menacing and highly supportive of his artists, promised him riches and creative environment beyond anything he’d seen before. We see Tupac’s interactions with labelmate Snoop Dogg (Jarrett Ellis, although I’m 99.9 percent sure Snoop dubbed the voice), and watch as Shakur works almost nonstop, jumping from studio to studio recording to fulfill his three-record deal with Death Row (which included the rap world’s first double album, which shares a title with this film).

Although All Eyez on Me has a 140-minute running time, it still feels rushed. Tupac’s life had so many components worthy of focus that director Benny Boom is forced to give most scenes a condensed feel, trimming any chance of lingering in a moment too long. Even the glimpses of Tupac on stage (which Shipp re-creates beautifully) are truncated. Most of the movie is framed as flashbacks, as Tupac is relating his story from jail to a journalist (Hill Harper), who might be the most aggressive interviewer ever portrayed on film. He’s more of a provocateur than journalist, but he does manage to keep Shakur talking about his life openly and challenges him to look at the contradictions in his music. If the film is to be believed, Tupac did listen to his critics, taking in their charges that his songs and videos were misogynistic and responding with a song like “Keep Ya Head Up.” I’m not sure I buy that order of events or their speed, but it fits well into the mythology.

One of the smartest things the filmmakers do is bring in Jamal Woolard to play Notorious B.I.G., just as he did in NOTORIOUS. Although that film did cover the initial friendship between Shakur and Smalls, ALL EYEZ ON ME gives it a lot more room to breathe and feel like an actual friendship. Biggie wanted to create party music and have fun, but Tupac encouraged him to go deep and use his fame to become a voice of the people. The reasons for their falling out and eventual feud seem to involve third parties that floated in and out of both of their circles. But whatever caused it, the movie seems to verify that their beef was over something ridiculous and exploded over warped definitions of masculinity and respect.

ALL EYEZ ON ME doesn’t attempt to uncover who killed Tupac (or Smalls a few months later), but it does make his death seem like an inevitable product of the lifestyle. Even with a new and fulfilling love interest in his life at the time (Kidada Jones, daughter of Quincy Jones), Tupac couldn’t resist the temptation to beat up some random guy he believed wronged him or one of his entourage in some way, and it may have lead to his getting killed. There’s undoubtedly an interesting movie or miniseries about Tupac’s life to be one day, but ALL EYEZ ON ME isn’t quite that. A combination of too many scenes that feel like abbreviated versions of a life and not enough illustrating what made Shakur unique and important sink the film when all is said and done.

Although it certainly doesn’t try to cover up his flaws (the movie spends a significant amount of time on his fighting a rape charge), the film almost treats his less-than-perfect moments as if they were necessary to create one of the greatest rappers of all time. The cast gives good performances, but when you’re working with an overwritten screenplay like this one, there’s only so much that they can do. It’s a closer call than you might think, but ALL EYEZ ON ME sells Tupac’s life short.
 

Blood$

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2017, 03:56:52 PM »
 

2Relevant

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2017, 02:56:45 PM »
as predicted shit juice ;)
 

Sccit

  • Made
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 24601
  • Thanked: 232 times
  • Karma: 156
  • אליאור
Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2017, 01:48:17 PM »
it was alright, pretty much what i expected .. dude who played pac did good
 

Chamillitary Click

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 25867
  • Thanked: 29 times
  • Karma: -295
  • The greatest entertainer ever.
Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2017, 03:48:19 PM »
To me it was the most basic interpretation of Pac's life. Didn't emphasize on who he was enough for me. Just kinda glossed over events.

You need a documentary to give Pac's life justice. An OJ 30 for 30 like documentary.

dude who played pac did good
 

2Relevant

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2017, 05:41:43 PM »
To me it was the most basic interpretation of Pac's life. Didn't emphasize on who he was enough for me. Just kinda glossed over events.

You need a documentary to give Pac's life justice. An OJ 30 for 30 like documentary.

dude who played pac did good

there's so much to discuss on pac i think a hbo type mini series would be better or some kind of Netflix series these money grab type movies will always fall short
 

Hack Wilson - real

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2017, 04:07:29 PM »
good movie but needed Stretch
 

FUCK-YOU-BItch

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2017, 06:53:51 AM »
This movie was cheap ass fuck. Not just like they cutted the real things out, they didn't put some money into the screening.
 
The following users thanked this post: Sccit

V2DHeart

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2017, 05:23:38 PM »
Was given tickets for this and didn't think I'd have the time to go this week but did. Went with my wife who isn't really a Hip Hop or a 2Pac fan but she enjoyed it.

I thought that it was a very good effort. I felt the way they worked around the prison interview to tell his history was good and that the acting on the parts of 2Pac, Afeni and Suge were surprisingly better than I had expected given the amount of criticism. Sure there were inaccuracies and perhaps not enough emphasis on the parts 2Pac fans would have preferred more detail on I.E.; the charitable individual, the compassion, more of the relationship between 2Pac and Suge, the FBI survellience, the intense work ethic and schedule, which would show the distinction between him and 90% of other top industry stars that gives him some of the admiration. A lot was glossed over, but the sheer volume and depth of his life, would, as many have stated require an entire series or 2 to really tell the full story but the movie did its job in my opinion. You could literally do an entire movie on each section of his life if you wanted to pick a section to focus on. Far too many comparing it to Straight Outta Compton, which was a different movie. Just look at the movie 'Ali' if you want to see a movie that is more comparable to All Eyez On Me in terms of glossing over events due to volume, and Will Smith done a fantastic job on the character too.

Both my wife and I were surprised it had reached the 2 hour mark and both had agreed that we could have easily watched another hour.

*spoilers*

The only negative I would have is that the ending could have been better, perhaps shown an aftermath of some kind, a phone call alert to family or the announcement and the effect it had. A hospital scene perhaps? The outpouring of support to show the severity or impact he had. Again time would have been difficult to fit in. Overall I'd easily give this movie a 7 out of 10
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/GsGVS-XIm7s" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/GsGVS-XIm7s</a> <a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/HaH1tquKmzE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/HaH1tquKmzE</a><a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/BJB9lz01vCo" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/BJB9lz01vCo</a><a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/N8vC1o2WggI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/N8vC1o2WggI</a>
 
The following users thanked this post: Sccit

Eddz

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2017, 01:52:04 AM »
Any news on the soundtrack or has it been scrapped?
 

Jay Wallace

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2017, 02:27:52 AM »
Any news on the soundtrack or has it been scrapped?

I'd venture to say it's been scrapped.  His family/estate control his music and from the sounds of things, they weren't pleased with the final product.  It should also be noted that no unreleased music made its way into the movie so odds are they probably aren't doing anything with it.
 

Eddz

Re: All Eyez on Me Reviews
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2017, 02:37:23 AM »
Any news on the soundtrack or has it been scrapped?

I'd venture to say it's been scrapped.  His family/estate control his music and from the sounds of things, they weren't pleased with the final product.  It should also be noted that no unreleased music made its way into the movie so odds are they probably aren't doing anything with it.

I thought they were releasing tracks by other artists like the Eastwood track and video that was recently released