Author Topic: What was ODB’s best solo work?  (Read 148 times)

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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What was ODB’s best solo work?
« on: May 25, 2019, 12:22:38 AM »
I’ve been on a Wu-tang vibe since the Mice and Men documentary came out.  Going thru different solo albums from their prime as well, like Ironman and Cappadonna’s solo and so on...

Now I’m on ODB’s first solo album and this shit jumps off like flames to a fire!  It’s like the East Coast Doggystyle the way shit jumps off.  Because you got this like comedy monologue in the opener and then the transition from the intro to the first track jumps off like Rage comin I’m on G Funk era, you got Dirty’s first single and signature joint “Shimmy Ya” then sandwiched between the next single “Brooklyn Zoo” is “Baby Come On” and again the transition is seemless through all 4 tracks—this is definitely an album meant to be heard straight through with no fast forwarding and no skipping (but later there is some filler and I will get to that).

It appears to the listener some of the production elements are similar in all 3 of the opening tracks or maybe that’s just the way Rza flips it. And remember Dirty also came up a beatbox for Rza and some of the sounds and cadence he flips with his words are like elements of the beat.  With this kind of chemistry it’s a fuckin shame that the fat Dirty would ever consider years later being disloyal and moving wit Dame Dash punk ass in Rockefeller.

The fire continued flaming for a few more tracks as other Wu members step to the mic and take some pressure off Dirty.  Which is needed, cause a Richard Pryor/Biz Markie emcee may run into trouble trying to carry an entire album.  Cause comic relief is meant to be brief, you got to have more substance.  Mostly Rza provides that still using those elements, clips, and samples from old Kung Fu flicks. But finally the album does get mired in some filler when Dirty makes some grotesque tracks for females that may only interest adolescent minds for a bit of comedy or slight shock value.  That’s where they mess up a bit is the female stuff which is part of Dirtys character “I once got burnt by a ghonerrea to be perverse but at some points it just doesn’t sound good.

So that’s my lil review of ODB first solo...
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"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Eminem will be bigger than Michael Jackson as long as he doesn't change."

-Dre, Rolling Stones mag 1999 Em cover

********
 

doggfather

Re: What was ODB’s best solo work?
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2019, 12:52:24 AM »
The best is the studio ton remix of shimmy shimmy ya with E-40 and MC Eiht
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I'm an ol' school collecta from the 90's SO F.CK DIGITAL, RELEASE A CD!

 

Sccit

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Re: What was ODB’s best solo work?
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2019, 12:28:19 PM »
his first album is a classic  ..  nigga please is great too
 

Duck Duck Doggy

Re: What was ODB’s best solo work?
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2019, 12:31:14 PM »
The best is the studio ton remix of shimmy shimmy ya with E-40 and MC Eiht

Wtf had no idea this existed. Will definitely have to peep.

As far as your review. I went through a Wu revival in 2018 and went back and listened to all their solo albums and did what you did and I remember being very pleasantly surprised with ODBs first album. RZA laced him up perfectly with the production as far as in concerned RZA should have gotten a 50/50 credit for that album. I wouldn’t say it’s up there with Doggystyle because there is absolutely no filler on Doggystyle and there clearly is on this album. Regardless I’d still call it a classic
 

Caliluv213

Re: What was ODB’s best solo work?
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2019, 03:07:07 PM »
Carry like Mariah song
 

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Re: What was ODB’s best solo work?
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2019, 04:55:33 PM »
The best is the studio ton remix of shimmy shimmy ya with E-40 and MC Eiht

Wtf had no idea this existed. Will definitely have to peep.

As far as your review. I went through a Wu revival in 2018 and went back and listened to all their solo albums and did what you did and I remember being very pleasantly surprised with ODBs first album. RZA laced him up perfectly with the production as far as in concerned RZA should have gotten a 50/50 credit for that album. I wouldn’t say it’s up there with Doggystyle because there is absolutely no filler on Doggystyle and there clearly is on this album. Regardless I’d still call it a classic

Rza did get a 50/50 split on those records back then cause they were signed through Rza’s Wu Productions which was gettin a 50/50 split with the major label

And by no means was I saying it’s as good as Doggystyle I was just saying it was a smooth transition from track to track and well sequenced like the way Dre would transition smoothly from one track to the next on Doggystyle.  Especially in the first few tracks I actually had to look to see if it had changed tracks a few times
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Eminem will be bigger than Michael Jackson as long as he doesn't change."

-Dre, Rolling Stones mag 1999 Em cover

********