Author Topic: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more  (Read 191 times)

Tanjential

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ever ask yourself a question and then quickly answer it for yourself afterwards?

I was just asking myself why out of all of the attempts Snoop has made to "presents..." us with new crony artists Dogg Food and Tha Eastsidaz (the first LP in particular) worked where projects like Doggy's Angels and other individual artist roll-outs worked less. But as I'm 8 or so tracks into Eastsidaz right now and having recently bumped DF the proof is in the pudding- the albums are classics, the projects are solid, the songs are just great. Some of the less successful Snoop presents projects had some hot singles and a couple other good songs but few had banger after banger the way Eastsidaz and Dogg Food do; 20 years later it's noteworthy that these records still knock.

What do y'all think?

-T

 
Fee Fie Foe Fum; somethin' stank and I want some.

My hip-hop group The West Coast Avengers @

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bouli77

Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2019, 03:47:41 AM »
Good question,

I think timing is important, Dogg Food was released when everything Death Row was selling like hotcakes : MWTC, Above the Rim. so Dogg Food was able to capitalize on that high selling streak. The controversy helped : they had been dropped by Time Warner, this garnered a lot of attention and Death Row used this for promotion. They didn't have to use Snoop's image and name (as Snoop did for Tha Eastsidaz) to sell the album as Snoop is not on the cover, the featurings are not even mentioned on the tracklist and Tha Dogg Pound (sensu stricto)

Tha Eastsidaz's projects had to use Snoop's image more than Dogg Food because, although Tray Deee was established as a frequent collaborator and he had been on several album projects, Tha Eastsidaz was a rookie group (whereas DPG had already been on multi platinum albums, with videos, and everything) so they weren't going to sell if Snoop hadn't attached his name and face to the project. It was also Snoop's very first release on Dogghouse / TVT, so Snoop had to let it be known that these were his artists and his project. The first album went platinum because of the quality of the product and timing as I said earlier, they created a momentum with G'd Up being released in December, 1999, less than a month after Dr Dre released 2001 and Kurupt dropped Tha Streetz Iz a Mutha, everybody was craving for that West Coast sound again. The timing and Snoop's implication helped propel the album to platinum status.

The second album capitalized on their first album's success and went gold with the same formula : monster single, Snoop all over it, very solid album.

As for the Doggy's Angels, the main differences were that 1) Snoop was not on the cover 2) Snoop was not part of the group 3) it was a female rap album so it usually sells less. Also, they were sued by Columbia Pictures because of the reference with Charlie's angels so it didn't help. Moreover, the album, albeit good, can't be compared in terms of quality with Tha Eastsidaz's problems. The single was dope but nowhere near G'd Up.

Now concerning the individual artists, it depends on the era and the timing but it's the same thing : they won't sell as much because Snoop is not part of the product and, unlike Dogg Food, Dogghouse / Doggystyle records was not the biggest label in the game and G-Funk / Gangsta Rap wasn't the sound of the day as it was in the mid 90's, so the albums weren't going to sell as much (also it was at the time when napster, kazaa and all were trending which killed album sales).

That's what happened with the Doggystyle All Stars Vol. 1 album (very solid album imo) : it came out in summer 2002, the buzz in the wake of 2001's release had died down, Snoop was in the shadows of the project so it didn't really sell. I don't think the choice of single was great as well (Not Like it Was was cool but I'd have chosen Dogghouse America, or Hey You, Fallen Star was too alternative IMO). I think the album was poorly promoted too.

On the whole, the details, the choices and the timing are very important to explain the different fates of Snoop Dogg presents... type of albums.
 

Sccit

Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2019, 06:57:18 AM »
doggy’s angels was lowkey hard tho

i think the answer is that no one wants to hear a female group wit zero sex appeal on a commercial level

if snoop dropped a trio of bad azz soopafly and half dead instead of doggy’s angels, i believe that woulda went platinum too

that said, doggy’s angels peaked at 7 on the billboard which ain’t half bad tbh
 

Tanjential

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Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2019, 09:36:20 AM »
Good question,

I think timing is important, Dogg Food was released when everything Death Row was selling like hotcakes : MWTC, Above the Rim. so Dogg Food was able to capitalize on that high selling streak. The controversy helped : they had been dropped by Time Warner, this garnered a lot of attention and Death Row used this for promotion. They didn't have to use Snoop's image and name (as Snoop did for Tha Eastsidaz) to sell the album as Snoop is not on the cover, the featurings are not even mentioned on the tracklist and Tha Dogg Pound (sensu stricto)

Tha Eastsidaz's projects had to use Snoop's image more than Dogg Food because, although Tray Deee was established as a frequent collaborator and he had been on several album projects, Tha Eastsidaz was a rookie group (whereas DPG had already been on multi platinum albums, with videos, and everything) so they weren't going to sell if Snoop hadn't attached his name and face to the project. It was also Snoop's very first release on Dogghouse / TVT, so Snoop had to let it be known that these were his artists and his project. The first album went platinum because of the quality of the product and timing as I said earlier, they created a momentum with G'd Up being released in December, 1999, less than a month after Dr Dre released 2001 and Kurupt dropped Tha Streetz Iz a Mutha, everybody was craving for that West Coast sound again. The timing and Snoop's implication helped propel the album to platinum status.

The second album capitalized on their first album's success and went gold with the same formula : monster single, Snoop all over it, very solid album.

As for the Doggy's Angels, the main differences were that 1) Snoop was not on the cover 2) Snoop was not part of the group 3) it was a female rap album so it usually sells less. Also, they were sued by Columbia Pictures because of the reference with Charlie's angels so it didn't help. Moreover, the album, albeit good, can't be compared in terms of quality with Tha Eastsidaz's problems. The single was dope but nowhere near G'd Up.

Now concerning the individual artists, it depends on the era and the timing but it's the same thing : they won't sell as much because Snoop is not part of the product and, unlike Dogg Food, Dogghouse / Doggystyle records was not the biggest label in the game and G-Funk / Gangsta Rap wasn't the sound of the day as it was in the mid 90's, so the albums weren't going to sell as much (also it was at the time when napster, kazaa and all were trending which killed album sales).

That's what happened with the Doggystyle All Stars Vol. 1 album (very solid album imo) : it came out in summer 2002, the buzz in the wake of 2001's release had died down, Snoop was in the shadows of the project so it didn't really sell. I don't think the choice of single was great as well (Not Like it Was was cool but I'd have chosen Dogghouse America, or Hey You, Fallen Star was too alternative IMO). I think the album was poorly promoted too.

On the whole, the details, the choices and the timing are very important to explain the different fates of Snoop Dogg presents... type of albums.

super appreciate this thorough response; reminds me of something i wanted to add:

this was the third attempt to break Tray Deee, the first being MWTC, second being Gang Related as part of Tha Gang. I find that so interesting that they kept at it trying to blow Tray Deee up, the faith they must have had in him...and why not? He's a super solid MC.

But that's kinda what got me thinking about it: third time was the charm. Those soundtracks were big too, but it apparently took everything you listed above in the form of a whole group album to finally get him his due.

- T

 
Fee Fie Foe Fum; somethin' stank and I want some.

My hip-hop group The West Coast Avengers @

westcoastavengers.com

@tanjintwiggy and @westcoastavengers on Instagram
 

Tanjential

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Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2019, 09:37:24 AM »
@sccit

doggy's angels was a cool-ass album, i saw that it's not on tidal...can anyone link me to where it can be heard? i legit used to own the hard copy.

-T

 
Fee Fie Foe Fum; somethin' stank and I want some.

My hip-hop group The West Coast Avengers @

westcoastavengers.com

@tanjintwiggy and @westcoastavengers on Instagram
 

Sccit

Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2019, 10:55:01 AM »
@sccit

doggy's angels was a cool-ass album, i saw that it's not on tidal...can anyone link me to where it can be heard? i legit used to own the hard copy.

-T


just buy a new copy on ebay brodie

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Pleezbalevit-by-Doggys-Angels-CD-SHIPS-FAST-FREE-17/123947130296?epid=3435498&hash=item1cdbd31db8:i:123947130296
 

Sccit

Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2019, 10:57:43 AM »
Good question,

I think timing is important, Dogg Food was released when everything Death Row was selling like hotcakes : MWTC, Above the Rim. so Dogg Food was able to capitalize on that high selling streak. The controversy helped : they had been dropped by Time Warner, this garnered a lot of attention and Death Row used this for promotion. They didn't have to use Snoop's image and name (as Snoop did for Tha Eastsidaz) to sell the album as Snoop is not on the cover, the featurings are not even mentioned on the tracklist and Tha Dogg Pound (sensu stricto)

Tha Eastsidaz's projects had to use Snoop's image more than Dogg Food because, although Tray Deee was established as a frequent collaborator and he had been on several album projects, Tha Eastsidaz was a rookie group (whereas DPG had already been on multi platinum albums, with videos, and everything) so they weren't going to sell if Snoop hadn't attached his name and face to the project. It was also Snoop's very first release on Dogghouse / TVT, so Snoop had to let it be known that these were his artists and his project. The first album went platinum because of the quality of the product and timing as I said earlier, they created a momentum with G'd Up being released in December, 1999, less than a month after Dr Dre released 2001 and Kurupt dropped Tha Streetz Iz a Mutha, everybody was craving for that West Coast sound again. The timing and Snoop's implication helped propel the album to platinum status.

The second album capitalized on their first album's success and went gold with the same formula : monster single, Snoop all over it, very solid album.

As for the Doggy's Angels, the main differences were that 1) Snoop was not on the cover 2) Snoop was not part of the group 3) it was a female rap album so it usually sells less. Also, they were sued by Columbia Pictures because of the reference with Charlie's angels so it didn't help. Moreover, the album, albeit good, can't be compared in terms of quality with Tha Eastsidaz's problems. The single was dope but nowhere near G'd Up.

Now concerning the individual artists, it depends on the era and the timing but it's the same thing : they won't sell as much because Snoop is not part of the product and, unlike Dogg Food, Dogghouse / Doggystyle records was not the biggest label in the game and G-Funk / Gangsta Rap wasn't the sound of the day as it was in the mid 90's, so the albums weren't going to sell as much (also it was at the time when napster, kazaa and all were trending which killed album sales).

That's what happened with the Doggystyle All Stars Vol. 1 album (very solid album imo) : it came out in summer 2002, the buzz in the wake of 2001's release had died down, Snoop was in the shadows of the project so it didn't really sell. I don't think the choice of single was great as well (Not Like it Was was cool but I'd have chosen Dogghouse America, or Hey You, Fallen Star was too alternative IMO). I think the album was poorly promoted too.

On the whole, the details, the choices and the timing are very important to explain the different fates of Snoop Dogg presents... type of albums.

super appreciate this thorough response; reminds me of something i wanted to add:

this was the third attempt to break Tray Deee, the first being MWTC, second being Gang Related as part of Tha Gang. I find that so interesting that they kept at it trying to blow Tray Deee up, the faith they must have had in him...and why not? He's a super solid MC.

But that's kinda what got me thinking about it: third time was the charm. Those soundtracks were big too, but it apparently took everything you listed above in the form of a whole group album to finally get him his due.

- T


actually 4th if you count lbc crew..

beware of my crew was actually a hit single off a thing line between love and hate ost, so he kinda was already in the public eye.
 

brandonpotts9900

Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2019, 05:42:51 AM »
Dog Food was released when everything Death Row was selling like hotcakes....
 

HighEyeCue

Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2019, 07:59:05 AM »
Dog Food was released when everything Death Row was selling like hotcakes....

Dogg Food could have sold even more but Death Row stopped promoting it after New York, New York and focused on 2Pac's album

 

Tanjential

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Re: successful (and less successful) roll-outs of artists by snoop + more
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2019, 08:11:30 AM »
true!


Good question,

I think timing is important, Dogg Food was released when everything Death Row was selling like hotcakes : MWTC, Above the Rim. so Dogg Food was able to capitalize on that high selling streak. The controversy helped : they had been dropped by Time Warner, this garnered a lot of attention and Death Row used this for promotion. They didn't have to use Snoop's image and name (as Snoop did for Tha Eastsidaz) to sell the album as Snoop is not on the cover, the featurings are not even mentioned on the tracklist and Tha Dogg Pound (sensu stricto)

Tha Eastsidaz's projects had to use Snoop's image more than Dogg Food because, although Tray Deee was established as a frequent collaborator and he had been on several album projects, Tha Eastsidaz was a rookie group (whereas DPG had already been on multi platinum albums, with videos, and everything) so they weren't going to sell if Snoop hadn't attached his name and face to the project. It was also Snoop's very first release on Dogghouse / TVT, so Snoop had to let it be known that these were his artists and his project. The first album went platinum because of the quality of the product and timing as I said earlier, they created a momentum with G'd Up being released in December, 1999, less than a month after Dr Dre released 2001 and Kurupt dropped Tha Streetz Iz a Mutha, everybody was craving for that West Coast sound again. The timing and Snoop's implication helped propel the album to platinum status.

The second album capitalized on their first album's success and went gold with the same formula : monster single, Snoop all over it, very solid album.

As for the Doggy's Angels, the main differences were that 1) Snoop was not on the cover 2) Snoop was not part of the group 3) it was a female rap album so it usually sells less. Also, they were sued by Columbia Pictures because of the reference with Charlie's angels so it didn't help. Moreover, the album, albeit good, can't be compared in terms of quality with Tha Eastsidaz's problems. The single was dope but nowhere near G'd Up.

Now concerning the individual artists, it depends on the era and the timing but it's the same thing : they won't sell as much because Snoop is not part of the product and, unlike Dogg Food, Dogghouse / Doggystyle records was not the biggest label in the game and G-Funk / Gangsta Rap wasn't the sound of the day as it was in the mid 90's, so the albums weren't going to sell as much (also it was at the time when napster, kazaa and all were trending which killed album sales).

That's what happened with the Doggystyle All Stars Vol. 1 album (very solid album imo) : it came out in summer 2002, the buzz in the wake of 2001's release had died down, Snoop was in the shadows of the project so it didn't really sell. I don't think the choice of single was great as well (Not Like it Was was cool but I'd have chosen Dogghouse America, or Hey You, Fallen Star was too alternative IMO). I think the album was poorly promoted too.

On the whole, the details, the choices and the timing are very important to explain the different fates of Snoop Dogg presents... type of albums.

super appreciate this thorough response; reminds me of something i wanted to add:

this was the third attempt to break Tray Deee, the first being MWTC, second being Gang Related as part of Tha Gang. I find that so interesting that they kept at it trying to blow Tray Deee up, the faith they must have had in him...and why not? He's a super solid MC.

But that's kinda what got me thinking about it: third time was the charm. Those soundtracks were big too, but it apparently took everything you listed above in the form of a whole group album to finally get him his due.

- T


actually 4th if you count lbc crew..

beware of my crew was actually a hit single off a thing line between love and hate ost, so he kinda was already in the public eye.

 
Fee Fie Foe Fum; somethin' stank and I want some.

My hip-hop group The West Coast Avengers @

westcoastavengers.com

@tanjintwiggy and @westcoastavengers on Instagram