Author Topic: Che Pope Interview (Aftermath/GOOD Music Alumni) Part 1  (Read 87 times)

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Che Pope Interview (Aftermath/GOOD Music Alumni) Part 1
« on: October 16, 2020, 12:18:05 AM »
http://www.illuminati2g.com/untouchable/che-pope-interview-aftermath-good-music-alumni-part-1/

Today, we sit with legendary producer and music mogul Che Pope. Che has worked with the likes of Kanye West, Pusha T, Dr. Dre, The Game, and many many more. He is internationally known and has twenty plus years in the music industry. He is a veteran and it was our pleasure to sit down with him for our multi-part interview. Here is part one. Remember to stay tuned to Illuminati2G for all your latest music news…enjoy.

We’re here with Che Vicious b.k.a. Che Pope. Former GOOD Music Executive and Aftermath in house producer, his time is much appreciated, what’s good with you Che?

Everything is well — Just plugging away on my new company — WRKSHP Media

Q.) Alright, so tell us, what got you into music? Who were your influences?

Caught the bug around 14 in terms of getting interested in the hip hop culture — Had an Aunt who was a big music head with a lot of vinyl so she put me on early (like 6,7 years old to minnie riperton, Curtis Mayfield, Earth Wind and Fire so I was well versed by the time I was 14 — then got turntables —Berklee school of music was not far from my high school and there was a cool music store near there (E.U. Wurlizer) its gone now but they use to let me hang out there for hours and not kick me out so I was able to learn all the gear — even though I didn’t own any

Q.) You started out officially with M People’s record. Tell us about how you got that chance.

M period was later — I started with Teddy Riley — signed to him for a year — but I had no placements. Teddy was great really taught me how to craft a song — song structure and overall production skills so he really elevated me. Kay Gee (dj/producer) from Naughy by Nature was also a good friend and mentor and Lord Finesses so I had great mentors and teachers.

Q.) You worked on the classic record “The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill”. How did that come about? You were all over the record. You did remixes for the album too, correct?

Well I was working with Wyclef for awhile before that and did a bunch of things with him (to all the girls, no, no, no, gone to November remix, ghetto superstar etc) and during that time I met Ms Hill and we hit it off well. So it was really an organic transition to working with Ms Hill. First record we did was something for Andrea Martin (who is still my homie) who was on Arista at the time and – A rose is still a rose for Aretha — we did those before we started Mis-education

Q.) You did drum programming on a Whitney Houston album. Was drum programming the way to get into the inner circle of the industry or just something you did for the love of music?

I NEVER just program on a record — IF YOU EVER JUST SEE THAT CREDIT THEN YOU KNOW I GOT FRONTED ON — PART THE JOURNEY SHALL WE SAY!!!!

Q.) You took your recognition to a whole new level when you worked on Mary J. Blige’s 1999 album “Mary”. Tell me more about that.

No I wouldn’t agree with you there – I’m from Boston and if you know anything about Boston people — were about respect and very principled — the business of music is a slick game and I had to learn the nuances — had to get the right team – lawyer and manager etc — that’s also why I decided to A&R to go inside the companies and learn them inside and out

When I did all I can say – for Mary I don’t even remember what year that was or whether it was before or after or in between miseducation because we worked on that record for so long

Q.) You remixed a Wyclef Jean record and worked with him on his album with the Refugee Allstars. Tell us about how you got that opportunity.

Simply put chance meeting — I was on probation (long story) — and had just move to NYC and had to have a job so I worked at Sam Ash music in time square (remember I knew every last piece of gear) I met Wyclef and he offered me a situation — I was at sam ash for 3 weeks. Not sure if it matters but some of the questions are out of chronological order — not sure if that matters or not —— but it goes went to la to soul train award with puff in 92 then Teddy then about to do a deal with Kay Gee (got in the wrong car – damn – probation) back to boston to reset then move to NYC sam ash – wyclef — Lauryn — then solo then Warner Bros records a&r

Q.) Speaking of remixes, you did a remix to Tatyana Ali’s record with Will Smith – Boy You Knock Me Out – tell us what was it like working with someone like Stonebridge on the record? He has an amazing catalog of records. You as well also have a great caliber of records you’ve worked on.

When you’re a freelance producer you are just hustling — Omar who works with Will is a friend and I went to college with Will’s younger brother Harry

Q.) You produced Pras’ “Ghetto Superstar”. Amazing and timeless record. Tell me about the making of that beat and the studio session itself.



As I understand it — originally John Forte was supposed to do a record for the soundtrack — not sure what happened there but Pras ended up having to save the day — I use to always have a lot of tracks and he knew that so he called me somewhat last minute and was like Yo Che I need you in LA (I still lived in Brooklyn at this point). So fly to cali to enterprise studio and met Jimmy Iovine (for the first time) — Mya who was brand new and ODB I had met before because Rza is my homie. Clef and Jerry were in another room there working on some stuff too. So we knocked it out — I had a track that everyone was feeling and we layered wyclef on guitar and jerry on bass to tuck the sample — I knew the Dolly chorus melody was gonna take alot so I really tried to hide the sample in the track but later on in life they found it…. Haaaaaaa

Stay updated with Illuminati2G. Part two drops two weeks from now. I know you can’t wait to read it, but here’s a little snippet from it. Remember, two weeks and for all your other music news and updates – keep it locked to Illuminati2G.

Q.) You worked with Common, tell us about that. Is there anything uncommon about Common? Haha.

Rashid (common) is dope — old friend — we used to hoop together — met him and his manager Derek Dudley when he and Ms Hill did a song — been cool every since
The record you’re referring to was for a movie sound track to this movie called white boys I scored
 
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doggfather

Re: Che Pope Interview (Aftermath/GOOD Music Alumni) Part 1
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2020, 01:31:12 AM »
nice work! nice find!

thank you!
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