Author Topic: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution  (Read 129 times)

Ant

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2142
  • Karma: -418
Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« on: November 12, 2004, 02:34:30 PM »
Stories like this one have been around for some time, but I figured I'd point this out for people who haven't heard about this yet.  Basically, a few southern states have been trying for almost a century now, to get their schools systems to stop teaching evolution, or in some cases to teach evolution alongside of creastionism as if both ideas hold equal scientific weight.  Amazingly, they are actually making some progress.  Wired Mag carried a better  article on this awhile back, but feel free to check this one out too and let me knwo what you think.

_____________
ATLANTA (AP) -- First, Georgia's education chief tried to take the word "evolution" out of the state's science curriculum. Now a suburban Atlanta county is in federal court over textbook stickers that call evolution "a theory, not a fact."

Some here worry that Georgia is making itself look like a bunch of rubes or, worse, discrediting its own students.

"People want to project the image that Georgia is a modern state, that we're in the 21st century. Then something like this happens," said Emory University molecular biologist Carlos Moreno.

The federal lawsuit being heard this week in Atlanta concerns whether the constitutional separation of church and state was violated when suburban Cobb County school officials placed the disclaimer stickers in high school biology texts in 2002. The stickers say evolution should be "critically considered."

Earlier this year, science teachers howled when state Schools Superintendent Kathy Cox proposed a new science curriculum that dropped the word "evolution" in favor of "changes over time."

That plan was quickly dropped, but comic Jimmy Fallon still cracked wise on "Saturday Night Live": "As a compromise, dinosaurs are now called 'Jesus Horses'."

Those who support the Cobb County stickers testified this week that they are aiming for a more open-minded education for students.

"I think the (evolution) theory is atheistic. And it's all that's presented. It's an insult to their intelligence that they're only taught evolution," said Marjorie Rogers, the parent who first complained about the biology texts.

Some scientists say they are frustrated the issue is still around nearly 80 years since the Scopes Monkey Trial -- the historic case heard in neighboring Tennessee over the teaching of evolution instead of the biblical story of creation.

"We're really busy. We have a lot to do. And here we are, having to go through this 19th century argument over and over again," said Sarah Pallas, who teaches biology and neuroscience at Georgia State University in Atlanta.

Moreno and dozens of other science instructors, along with the county superintendent, argued that the stickers only make the state look backward. And high school teacher Wes McCoy worried the issue could tarnish his students.

"I didn't want college admission counselors thinking less of their science educations, thinking they hadn't been taught evolution or something," McCoy testified.

Moreno recalled how, after graduating from Georgia public schools, he headed north to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, only to find that people were less than kind about his educational roots.

"They felt Southerners were not only less well educated, but less intelligent," Moreno said.

Doughnut shop worker Maria Jordan, 48, said her Atlanta customers were shaking their heads over the latest dispute. "Lord, don't we have more important things to worry about?" she asked. "It's just a flat-out embarrassment."

As for what they are saying elsewhere around the country, she said: "Whatever Georgia's getting up north, we're putting it on ourselves."
 

Suga Foot

  • Hennessy Chaser
  • Made
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10708
  • Thanked: 5 times
  • Karma: 551
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2004, 04:25:34 PM »
I learned about Evolution, and the beggings of religion in High School.  Why not just teach both?  or give students a choice?
 

Don Seer

Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2004, 04:32:44 PM »

let the kids tick a box about what they believe.. then they can be taught either way. ;)

 

Ant

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2142
  • Karma: -418
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2004, 05:12:14 PM »
I learned about Evolution, and the beggings of religion in High School.  Why not just teach both?  or give students a choice?

Yeah that's understandable depending upon its presentation.  The reason we should not teach both in a similiar context is because doing so gives legitimacy to a theory that has not earned it. 

No one claims evolution is a perfect theory, but it is a scientific theory, one that has been put through a process, and earned the right to be considered 'theory.'  Creationism on the other hand has not held up to the criticism of the scientific process.  This is why they should not be presented as equals, and this is why students should not be given a choice over scientific theories. 

You can't choose the scientific theory that suits you.  You can choose a particular religiou, or worldview, but science is not a matter of choice or preference. 

So basically, that is why this is a real issue, and why we should not be teaching evolution in biology classes.  If you want to teach it in some sort of history or sociology course, then that is reasonable, but a few red states want to teach it as if it is a scientiific theory. 

Hopefully this answers your question. 
 

7even

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11289
  • Karma: -679
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2004, 05:54:35 PM »
not teaching kids about evolution is a horrible thing imo.
Cause I don't care where I belong no more
What we share or not I will ignore
And I won't waste my time fitting in
Cause I don't think contrast is a sin
No, it's not a sin
 

davida.b.

Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2004, 06:20:03 PM »
Damn, what a bunch of white trash. This is just flat out dumb.

Acgrundy

  • Guest
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2004, 03:13:54 AM »
only in dumb ass fuckin states like georgia.  shit you got people over there that are big reason's why America is so fuckin dumb.
 

I TO DA GEEZY

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2630
  • Karma: 185
  • Humankind will thrive on compassion
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2004, 04:42:35 AM »
I learned about Evolution, and the beggings of religion in High School.  Why not just teach both?  or give students a choice?

Yeah that's understandable depending upon its presentation.  The reason we should not teach both in a similiar context is because doing so gives legitimacy to a theory that has not earned it. 

No one claims evolution is a perfect theory, but it is a scientific theory, one that has been put through a process, and earned the right to be considered 'theory.'  Creationism on the other hand has not held up to the criticism of the scientific process.  This is why they should not be presented as equals, and this is why students should not be given a choice over scientific theories. 

You can't choose the scientific theory that suits you.  You can choose a particular religiou, or worldview, but science is not a matter of choice or preference. 

So basically, that is why this is a real issue, and why we should not be teaching evolution in biology classes.  If you want to teach it in some sort of history or sociology course, then that is reasonable, but a few red states want to teach it as if it is a scientiific theory. 

Hopefully this answers your question. 

Let me ask you this, What type of a process has it been put through? The diffrend skull structure of ancient Human Skeleton archeologists discovered?
What makes them think the Skelton is even Human(-by defenition or doesn't belong to some extinct Human alike rase)? Have we been seeing monkeys evolving into Human beings Alongside the Human rase?....A theory is something that is yet to be proven, it's not a fact....News Flash when it comes down to theories there's a great deal of choice for scientists and as far as religion goes in every religion there are strict rules that distinguish it from the rest of the religions so as soon as u follow one switching it is a logical dissonance...
We are all human beings isn't that a good enough reason for peace?
 

Ant

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2142
  • Karma: -418
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2004, 11:06:31 AM »
I learned about Evolution, and the beggings of religion in High School.  Why not just teach both?  or give students a choice?

Yeah that's understandable depending upon its presentation.  The reason we should not teach both in a similiar context is because doing so gives legitimacy to a theory that has not earned it. 

No one claims evolution is a perfect theory, but it is a scientific theory, one that has been put through a process, and earned the right to be considered 'theory.'  Creationism on the other hand has not held up to the criticism of the scientific process.  This is why they should not be presented as equals, and this is why students should not be given a choice over scientific theories. 

You can't choose the scientific theory that suits you.  You can choose a particular religiou, or worldview, but science is not a matter of choice or preference. 

So basically, that is why this is a real issue, and why we should not be teaching evolution in biology classes.  If you want to teach it in some sort of history or sociology course, then that is reasonable, but a few red states want to teach it as if it is a scientiific theory. 

Hopefully this answers your question. 

Let me ask you this, What type of a process has it been put through? The diffrend skull structure of ancient Human Skeleton archeologists discovered?
What makes them think the Skelton is even Human(-by defenition or doesn't belong to some extinct Human alike rase)? Have we been seeing monkeys evolving into Human beings Alongside the Human rase?....A theory is something that is yet to be proven, it's not a fact....News Flash when it comes down to theories there's a great deal of choice for scientists and as far as religion goes in every religion there are strict rules that distinguish it from the rest of the religions so as soon as u follow one switching it is a logical dissonance...

Currently there is the 'theory of evolution' there are no other competing theories, so if you say there is a "great deal of choice for scientists" I have no idea what those choices are.   Additionally, I am not a biologist, but there is a lot of evidence to support the 'theory of evolution.'  The theory of evolution, from my understanding, is still under criticism by the scientific community, and it is still being developed and improved upon.  Creationism is not a 'scientific theory.'  It is a religious theory, and that being the case it should not be taught in a science class.  If you want to teach creationism, teach it in religiou, sociology, or history perhaps, but it has no right to exist in a scientific textbook.  To do so only degrades science, and our students. 

Just because people strongly believe in something doesn't give it the right to be called 'science.'   Certain ideas have to earn the privledge of being called scientific theory, creationism has not earned that privledge for obvious reasons.  A lot of people strongly believe in ghosts, and mind reading, and some people even claim there is evidence to support these ideas, but we don't teach these things in science class because they aren't science. 

Put more simply, you teach science in science classes.  Evolution is a scientific theory and should be taught in a class on science.  Creationism is not science, and it doesn't belong in a class on science.  No one requires religion classes to teach evolution and likewise creationism should not be taught in science class.
 

Javier

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8585
  • Karma: 284
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2004, 12:37:50 PM »
Quote
Let me ask you this, What type of a process has it been put through? The diffrend skull structure of ancient Human Skeleton archeologists discovered?
What makes them think the Skelton is even Human(-by defenition or doesn't belong to some extinct Human alike rase)? Have we been seeing monkeys evolving into Human beings Alongside the Human rase?....A theory is something that is yet to be proven, it's not a fact....News Flash when it comes down to theories there's a great deal of choice for scientists and as far as religion goes in every religion there are strict rules that distinguish it from the rest of the religions so as soon as u follow one switching it is a logical dissonance...


You are using the word theory in the way hypothesis is used. 
 

mauzip

  • Guest
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2004, 12:43:03 PM »
The way I see it is this.

History can't be proven: Everything we know about the past is from sources like letters, findings, etc. We haven't been there, so we don't know if something really happened and the way it was as we think it was. Yet, it's very very likely what we get taught is true. It's the same thing with evolution.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2004, 12:46:08 PM by mauzip »
 

Suffice

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2403
  • Karma: 18
  • Ain't no motherfuckin' llama!
Re: Georgia Still Debating the Theory of Evolution
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2004, 02:21:10 AM »
Only a fuckin prick would want his kid to learn Creationism and not evolution. What is this country coming to?
"You only live once, you might as well die now" - Slim Shady (RIP)