Author Topic: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?  (Read 142 times)

AndrE16686

  • Guest
Hiphop now has a huge presence in U.S society and that of the world. Political and social issues have traditionally been addressed in hiphop, but this phase appears to be coming to an end, in a new era of rap. Mainstream rap seems more concerned with recycling the material image of the thugged out era, while ignoring the accompanying revolutionary spirit and consciousness. Has this consciousness reached it's end of days as rap begins to look more like a get rich scheme, rather than being based on the artist's ability and substance? >:( 8) ;D
 

7even

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11289
  • Karma: -679
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2005, 04:43:51 AM »
 :sign_lastweek:

This sign is by far not enough.

Of course rappers should write better lyrics, what the hell is there to debate on?
Cause I don't care where I belong no more
What we share or not I will ignore
And I won't waste my time fitting in
Cause I don't think contrast is a sin
No, it's not a sin
 

Diabolical

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3275
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Karma: 22
  • Give me the teetle!
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2005, 12:14:23 PM »
Lots of rappers do just the ones who are popular dont. And they only should if they have a valid point to make.
I dont want to hear 50 Cent trying to do it.
 

jpm

  • Muthafuckin' Double OG
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 587
  • Karma: 13
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2005, 12:15:49 PM »
I dont want to hear 50 Cent trying to do it.

word
www.ReallyHipHop.com for all the latest hip-hop media available!
 

7even

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 11289
  • Karma: -679
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2005, 01:47:18 PM »
50 is actually a talented lyricist. Not rhyme-wise, but he can come up with impressive lines. You have to understand that since he's signed to Aftermath, he has to dumb down. Still GRODT has some good lines.
Cause I don't care where I belong no more
What we share or not I will ignore
And I won't waste my time fitting in
Cause I don't think contrast is a sin
No, it's not a sin
 

rafsta

  • Guest
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2005, 04:27:01 PM »
Hiphop now has a huge presence in U.S society and that of the world. Political and social issues have traditionally been addressed in hiphop, but this phase appears to be coming to an end, in a new era of rap. Mainstream rap seems more concerned with recycling the material image of the thugged out era, while ignoring the accompanying revolutionary spirit and consciousness. Has this consciousness reached it's end of days as rap begins to look more like a get rich scheme, rather than being based on the artist's ability and substance? >:( 8) ;D

if theyre well educated then why not speak on political issues ? i dont like rappers fabricating history to spark controversy *caughs* rass kass...
 

Sikotic™

  • Moderator
  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 28701
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Karma: 3135
  • PussyCunt
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2005, 04:36:13 PM »
If they feel compelled to, then fuck yeah. If anyone feels like sharing their views then they should.
 

Infinite Trapped in 1996

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10859
  • Thanked: 33 times
  • Karma: -1130
  • Permenent Resident of 1996 Pre-Sept. 13th
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2005, 04:55:02 PM »
Hiphop now has a huge presence in U.S society and that of the world. Political and social issues have traditionally been addressed in hiphop, but this phase appears to be coming to an end, in a new era of rap. Mainstream rap seems more concerned with recycling the material image of the thugged out era, while ignoring the accompanying revolutionary spirit and consciousness. Has this consciousness reached it's end of days as rap begins to look more like a get rich scheme, rather than being based on the artist's ability and substance? >:( 8) ;D

The Zulu Nation started out as a street gang, and when they turned to hip-hop it was primarily as a tool to raise the consciousness of the streets, and it was also used as a tool of resistance for the poor and disenfranchised.  It was the voice of the streets.  I think it was Chuck D who called it the black CNN.  Sure, it was also about partying and having a good time and all of that, but even rappers like 2pac who claimed who brought thug life to the forefront also had a political side.  2pac knew what the music was really for, that it was a waste if it didn't improve the plight of his people, that it was a waste if it didn't advance the struggle of his people. 

Like anything in life, you can use it for good or you can use it for evil.  Today rappers are just wasting the art form.  Even rappers like Talib Kweli, Mos Def and Common really aren't that conscious anymore.  Remember when Ice Cube used to be a political rapper?  Even the Chronic was political in my opinoin, it was speaking on police brutality, the LA riots, Rodney King trial, black empowerment.  But Dre's latest record has almost zero political content.  For that matter, back in the day, even pop rappers like MC Hammer had a few uplifting, empowering tracks on their albums.  Or a gangsta rapper like Ice Tea still dropped some gems of knowledge.  Times have changed, and it's getting worse. 
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Eminem will be bigger than Michael Jackson as long as he doesn't change."

-Dre, Rolling Stones mag 1999 Em cover

********
 

Kal EL

  • Guest
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2005, 08:13:53 AM »
While I would LOVE to hear content overall this Bullshit. I have to agree that it would only be good if the person had A) a valid point and B) something to say other than murder,steal, bitches.
 

Diabolical

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3275
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Karma: 22
  • Give me the teetle!
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2005, 08:21:24 AM »
I have never heard 50 Cent say one intelligent thing about politics or society.
 

Just Another Sunny day in California

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1778
  • Karma: -47
  • Twin Turbos....yeeeee
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2005, 01:25:10 PM »
yes they should, that's why Pac IMO is the G.O.A.T. because he spoke about social and political issues unlike these rappers nowadays
Oh I like this one... One dog goes one way, the other dog goes the other way, and this guy's sayin', "Whadda ya want from me?

 

AndrE16686

  • Guest
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2005, 11:43:19 PM »
yes they should, that's why Pac IMO is the G.O.A.T. because he spoke about social and political issues unlike these rappers nowadays

Yeah this is also probably why no other rapper has managed to come near his standard. But with the trend of following in the likeness of Pac's image, why is it that rappers choose to take elements of his thug persona and ignore everything else meaningful he stood for? Is it a fear of upsetting the same people Pac did? Are rappers now hesitant to follow in his steps in fear that they create too much of a stir in certain circles of society. Pac wouldn't of been able to keep silent on the increasing bullshit being committed. What is it with other self confessed thug life MCs rapping as if hiphop is only about holding heat, bitches and wearing a bulletproof vest evey hour of the day? 
 

HK Mofo

  • Lil Geezy
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 29
  • Karma: -4
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2005, 01:52:48 AM »
YES!  Rappers should speak out more on social and political issues in rhyme!  The power of the spoken word... in rhythm?  What communication thru art is stronger?
 

Bomb-A®

  • Muthafuckin' Don!
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3322
  • Karma: 244
  • The Legend
Re: Should rappers speak out more on social and political issues?
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2005, 08:24:08 AM »
there are rappers who touch on social and political issuese....but no1 buys their shit



peace