Author Topic: Twenty-Two a Day  (Read 79 times)

Ant

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Twenty-Two a Day
« on: April 25, 2005, 01:05:11 PM »
http://portal.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2005/04/25/wirq25.xml&sSheet=/news/2005/04/25/ixnewstop.html

Iraqi army and police units are deserting their posts after the recent escalation in insurgent attacks, according to reports from around the country yesterday.

The end of a relative period of calm after the election has posed the first real test for the embryonic security forces since coalition troops started cutting back on their military operations in February.

On average 20 Iraqis and two coalition soldiers have died every day this month.

On May 29, 2004, a station wagon that Iraqi insurgents had packed with C-4 explosives blew up on a highway in Ramadi, killing four American marines who died for lack of a few inches of steel.
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unfortunately, the iraqi army wasn't the only one suffering disappointing casualities this week...   

Bloodied Marines Sound Off About Want of Armor and Men
By MICHAEL MOSS

On May 29, 2004, a station wagon that Iraqi insurgents had packed with C-4 explosives blew up on a highway in Ramadi, killing four American marines who died for lack of a few inches of steel.

The four were returning to camp in an unarmored Humvee that their unit had rigged with scrap metal, but the makeshift shields rose only as high as their shoulders, photographs of the Humvee show, and the shrapnel from the bomb shot over the top.


"The steel was not high enough," said Staff Sgt. Jose S. Valerio, their motor transport chief, who along with the unit's commanding officers said the men would have lived had their vehicle been properly armored. "Most of the shrapnel wounds were to their heads."

Among those killed were Rafael Reynosa, a 28-year-old lance corporal from Santa Ana, Calif., whose wife was expecting twins, and Cody S. Calavan, a 19-year-old private first class from Lake Stevens, Wash., who had the Marine Corps motto, Semper Fidelis, tattooed across his back.

They were not the only losses for Company E during its six-month stint last year in Ramadi. In all, more than one-third of the unit's 185 troops were killed or wounded, the highest casualty rate of any company in the war, Marine Corps officials say.

In returning home, the leaders and Marine infantrymen have chosen to break an institutional code of silence and tell their story, one they say was punctuated not only by a lack of armor, but also by a shortage of men and planning that further hampered their efforts in battle, destroyed morale and ruined the careers of some of their fiercest warriors.



http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/25/international/middleeast/25marines.html?ex=1272081600&en=27b65ca641c8d56c&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss
 

WestCoasta

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Re: Twenty-Two a Day
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2005, 08:49:57 PM »
 >:(
 

rafsta

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Re: Twenty-Two a Day
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2005, 05:04:13 AM »
this aticles .com already... its a real shame whats happenin over there tho.
 

Matrix Heart

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Re: Twenty-Two a Day
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2005, 08:37:58 AM »
Ah well.