Author Topic: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?  (Read 594 times)

Ðøšïå

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #30 on: August 18, 2005, 07:52:55 AM »
when i was like 16 my dumbass was punching with dumbells and i dislocated my left shoulder. fucked it up pretty bad and to this day it still pops and i cant throw a decent hook or else that shit hurts. i was going to go to the doctor this sumemr but never really made the time for it. and since ive always lifted weights on and off since i was 16 my right side is a little bigger then my left. so if i was you id try to catch it early. im hoping if i ever go they can fix it. i jsut am to lazy and busy to visit the doctor. :)
 

Don Seer

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #31 on: August 18, 2005, 08:11:57 AM »
God damn this shit is hurting like a bitch now. It's gettin all stiff.
ya mighta trapped a nerve.. go see a doc.. get that ish x-rayed..
 

UAK

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #32 on: August 18, 2005, 08:47:43 AM »
Dislocation


Description

The shoulder joint is the most frequently dislocated major joint of the body. In a typical case of a dislocated shoulder, a strong force that pulls the shoulder outward (abduction) or extreme rotation of the joint pops the ball of the humerus out of the shoulder socket. Dislocation commonly occurs when there is a backward pull on the arm that either catches the muscles unprepared to resist or overwhelms the muscles. When a shoulder dislocates frequently, the condition is referred to as shoulder instability. A partial dislocation where the upper arm bone is partially in and partially out of the socket is called a subluxation. In the medical community, dislocation is commonly referred to as luxation.


Signs and diagnosis

The shoulder can dislocate either forward, backward, or downward. Not only does the arm appear out of position when the shoulder dislocates, but the dislocation also produces pain. Muscle spasms may increase the intensity of pain. Swelling, numbness, weakness, and bruising are likely to develop. Problems seen with a dislocated shoulder are tearing of the ligaments or tendons reinforcing the joint capsule and, less commonly, nerve damage. Doctors usually diagnose a dislocation by a physical examination, and x rays may be taken to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out a related fracture.


Treatment

Doctors treat a dislocation by putting the ball of the humerus back into the joint socket--a procedure called a reduction. The arm is then immobilized in a sling or a device called a shoulder immobilizer for several weeks. Usually the doctor recommends resting the shoulder and applying ice three or four times a day. After pain and swelling have been controlled, the patient enters a rehabilitation program that includes exercises to restore the range of motion of the shoulder and strengthen the muscles to prevent future dislocations. These exercises may progress from simple motion to the use of weights.

After treatment and recovery, a previously dislocated shoulder may remain more susceptible to reinjury, especially in young, active individuals. Ligaments may have been stretched or torn, and the shoulder may tend to dislocate again. A shoulder that dislocates severely or often, injuring surrounding tissues or nerves, usually requires surgical repair to tighten stretched ligaments or reattach torn ones.

Sometimes the doctor performs surgery through a tiny incision into which a small scope (arthroscope) is inserted to observe the inside of the joint. After this procedure, called arthroscopic surgery, the shoulder is generally immobilized for about 6 weeks and full recovery takes several months. Arthroscopic techniques involving the shoulder are relatively new and many surgeons prefer to repair a recurrent dislocating shoulder by the time-tested open surgery under direct vision. There are usually fewer repeat dislocations and improved movement following open surgery, but it may take a little longer to regain motion.


Separation


Description

A shoulder separation occurs where the collarbone (clavicle) meets the shoulder blade (scapula). When ligaments that hold the AC (acromioclavicular) joint together are partially or completely torn, the outer end of the clavicle may slip out of place, preventing it from properly meeting the scapula. Most often the injury is caused by a blow to the shoulder or by falling on an outstretched hand.


Signs and diagnosis

Shoulder pain or tenderness and, occasionally, a bump in the middle of the top of the shoulder (over the AC joint) are signs that a separation may have occurred. Sometimes the severity of a separation can be detected by taking x rays while the patient holds a light weight that pulls on the muscles, making a separation more pronounced.


Treatment

A shoulder separation is usually treated conservatively by rest and wearing a sling. Soon after injury, an ice bag may be applied to relieve pain and swelling. After a period of rest, a therapist helps the patient perform exercises that put the shoulder through its range of motion. Most shoulder separations heal within 2 or 3 months without further intervention. However, if ligaments are severely torn, surgical repair may be required to hold the clavicle in place. A doctor may wait to see if conservative treatment works before deciding whether surgery is required.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dislocated_Shoulder
 

Sikotic™

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #33 on: August 18, 2005, 05:31:41 PM »
Dislocation


Description

The shoulder joint is the most frequently dislocated major joint of the body. In a typical case of a dislocated shoulder, a strong force that pulls the shoulder outward (abduction) or extreme rotation of the joint pops the ball of the humerus out of the shoulder socket. Dislocation commonly occurs when there is a backward pull on the arm that either catches the muscles unprepared to resist or overwhelms the muscles. When a shoulder dislocates frequently, the condition is referred to as shoulder instability. A partial dislocation where the upper arm bone is partially in and partially out of the socket is called a subluxation. In the medical community, dislocation is commonly referred to as luxation.


Signs and diagnosis

The shoulder can dislocate either forward, backward, or downward. Not only does the arm appear out of position when the shoulder dislocates, but the dislocation also produces pain. Muscle spasms may increase the intensity of pain. Swelling, numbness, weakness, and bruising are likely to develop. Problems seen with a dislocated shoulder are tearing of the ligaments or tendons reinforcing the joint capsule and, less commonly, nerve damage. Doctors usually diagnose a dislocation by a physical examination, and x rays may be taken to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out a related fracture.


Treatment

Doctors treat a dislocation by putting the ball of the humerus back into the joint socket--a procedure called a reduction. The arm is then immobilized in a sling or a device called a shoulder immobilizer for several weeks. Usually the doctor recommends resting the shoulder and applying ice three or four times a day. After pain and swelling have been controlled, the patient enters a rehabilitation program that includes exercises to restore the range of motion of the shoulder and strengthen the muscles to prevent future dislocations. These exercises may progress from simple motion to the use of weights.

After treatment and recovery, a previously dislocated shoulder may remain more susceptible to reinjury, especially in young, active individuals. Ligaments may have been stretched or torn, and the shoulder may tend to dislocate again. A shoulder that dislocates severely or often, injuring surrounding tissues or nerves, usually requires surgical repair to tighten stretched ligaments or reattach torn ones.

Sometimes the doctor performs surgery through a tiny incision into which a small scope (arthroscope) is inserted to observe the inside of the joint. After this procedure, called arthroscopic surgery, the shoulder is generally immobilized for about 6 weeks and full recovery takes several months. Arthroscopic techniques involving the shoulder are relatively new and many surgeons prefer to repair a recurrent dislocating shoulder by the time-tested open surgery under direct vision. There are usually fewer repeat dislocations and improved movement following open surgery, but it may take a little longer to regain motion.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dislocated_Shoulder

HAHA, the doc gave me the exact same info, word for word. So no serious damage was found, eventhough they suspect some nerve damage because my hand goes numb and tingles.

This is me for 2 weeks:

 

Da Flamboyant 1

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #34 on: August 18, 2005, 05:38:50 PM »
damn nigga u got a mean forehead on u
 

Sikotic™

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #35 on: August 18, 2005, 05:43:01 PM »
Its a fivehead plus receeding hairline at 20 years old, son.
 

UAK

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #36 on: August 18, 2005, 10:58:28 PM »
I know why you're sad...


No more  :tosser:  ;D
 

Dogg_Pound_Gangsta

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #37 on: August 18, 2005, 11:29:17 PM »
I know why you're sad...


No more  :tosser:  ;D

LMAO

You look like some one just kicked your dog man!
 

Sikotic™

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #38 on: August 19, 2005, 12:44:02 AM »
I know why you're sad...


No more  :tosser:  ;D

Ha Ha, not true.

I'm a lefty  ;D

*goes to the porn section*
 

Addicted To Cake

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2005, 12:50:49 AM »
you're armenian?
 

Sikotic™

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #40 on: August 19, 2005, 12:51:45 AM »
 

Addicted To Cake

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #41 on: August 19, 2005, 12:53:28 AM »
i assume black is the other fitty?
 

UAK

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Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #42 on: August 19, 2005, 12:53:33 AM »
There goes your left shoulder  ;D


 

Sikotic™

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #43 on: August 19, 2005, 12:59:16 AM »
i assume black is the other fitty?
Nah, it's philipino.
 

Don Seer

Re: Anyone dislocate their shoulder before?
« Reply #44 on: August 19, 2005, 01:03:02 AM »
^ your bro come home yet or he still in hiding?