Author Topic: Descriptions of Heaven And Hell are not to be taken literally as some do...  (Read 77 times)

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Descriptions are to be taken allegorically. As God says in the Noble Qu'ran, 32:17 about those who are blessed with Paradise;

[32:17] "You have no idea[/i] how much joy and happiness are waiting for you as a reward for your (righteous) works."

The descriptions of Heaven and Hell as presented to us now, is to nullify the excuses of those who would say, "If we would have known how terrible Hell really was, we would never have done what we did."

Also note that throughout the Quran, whenever a description of Hell is mentioned, the promise of bliss and beauty for the righteous, is mentioned along side it. God is the Most Merciful.

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"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Ain't trying to stick around for Illuminati (One World Government Takeover) / Got to buy my own island by the year 2-G

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J Bananas

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haha that guy looks funny like a hamster or something. is he a terrorist?
 

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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If you knew anything about the man pictured above you would not disrespect him. 

Even if your not a Muslim or an African American.  If your just a hip-hop head you have to respect him.  "Rap" music was partly named after him, as his nickname was "Rap" years before the first rap record was put on wax, he was a popular public speaker in the African American resistance movement back in the 60's, he used to use colorful, speach and language, for example, he'd say something like "If the white man don't come around/ We are going to burn Birmingham (Alabama) down!" [/i]  And in the now-classic book he wrote in the 60's he drops "raps" that came from "playing the dozens" that are iller than any mc out today.

...But that was H. "Rap" Browne in the 60's, when he was a leader in the African American resistance struggle.  While a political prisoner in the 70's, he embraced Islam and changed his name to Jamil Al-Amin.  Islam broadened his outlook, and he now teaches that the struggle for justice is not exclusive to African Americans, but it is a struggle that transcends race and nationality, and that Islam is the best blueprint.
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Ain't trying to stick around for Illuminati (One World Government Takeover) / Got to buy my own island by the year 2-G

******
 

J Bananas

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Quote
If you knew anything about the man pictured above you would not disrespect him.

Even if your not a Muslim or an African American.  If your just a hip-hop head you have to respect him.  "Rap" music was partly named after him, as his nickname was "Rap" years before the first rap record was put on wax, he was a popular public speaker in the African American resistance movement back in the 60's, he used to use colorful, speach and language, for example, he'd say something like "If the white man don't come around/ We are going to burn Birmingham (Alabama) down!"   And in the now-classic book he wrote in the 60's he drops "raps" that came from "playing the dozens" that are iller than any mc out today.

...But that was H. "Rap" Browne in the 60's, when he was a leader in the African American resistance struggle.  While a political prisoner in the 70's, he embraced Islam and changed his name to Jamil Al-Amin.  Islam broadened his outlook, and he now teaches that the struggle for justice is not exclusive to African Americans, but it is a struggle that transcends race and nationality, and that Islam is the best blueprint.

ROFLMAO! yeah he sounds like a real important guy. ;D
 

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Quote
If you knew anything about the man pictured above you would not disrespect him.

Even if your not a Muslim or an African American.  If your just a hip-hop head you have to respect him.  "Rap" music was partly named after him, as his nickname was "Rap" years before the first rap record was put on wax, he was a popular public speaker in the African American resistance movement back in the 60's, he used to use colorful, speach and language, for example, he'd say something like "If the white man don't come around/ We are going to burn Birmingham (Alabama) down!"   And in the now-classic book he wrote in the 60's he drops "raps" that came from "playing the dozens" that are iller than any mc out today.

...But that was H. "Rap" Browne in the 60's, when he was a leader in the African American resistance struggle.  While a political prisoner in the 70's, he embraced Islam and changed his name to Jamil Al-Amin.  Islam broadened his outlook, and he now teaches that the struggle for justice is not exclusive to African Americans, but it is a struggle that transcends race and nationality, and that Islam is the best blueprint.

ROFLMAO! yeah he sounds like a real important guy. ;D

He was a top official in both the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and the Black Panther Party in the 60's before he embraced Islam, and after embracing Islam, a handful of masjids throughout America followed his leadership, and in Atlanta he has Islamic businesses, masjids, and communities that he's biult from the ground up, he's studied over sea's in Sudan, and he lead a delegation of 100's from America to Hajj. 

So infact, he is actually one of the most important American figures of 60's era, he is an icon in the African American community, and his influence is still large today in the Muslim community.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2005, 10:26:41 PM by Allah's Slave: Abdul-Infinite »
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Ain't trying to stick around for Illuminati (One World Government Takeover) / Got to buy my own island by the year 2-G

******
 

Sweet & Tender Hooligan

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Quote
If you knew anything about the man pictured above you would not disrespect him.

Even if your not a Muslim or an African American.  If your just a hip-hop head you have to respect him.  "Rap" music was partly named after him, as his nickname was "Rap" years before the first rap record was put on wax, he was a popular public speaker in the African American resistance movement back in the 60's, he used to use colorful, speach and language, for example, he'd say something like "If the white man don't come around/ We are going to burn Birmingham (Alabama) down!"   And in the now-classic book he wrote in the 60's he drops "raps" that came from "playing the dozens" that are iller than any mc out today.

...But that was H. "Rap" Browne in the 60's, when he was a leader in the African American resistance struggle.  While a political prisoner in the 70's, he embraced Islam and changed his name to Jamil Al-Amin.  Islam broadened his outlook, and he now teaches that the struggle for justice is not exclusive to African Americans, but it is a struggle that transcends race and nationality, and that Islam is the best blueprint.

ROFLMAO! yeah he sounds like a real important guy. ;D

He was a top official in both the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and the Black Panther Party in the 60's before he embraced Islam, and after embracing Islam, a handful of masjids throughout America followed his leadership, and in Atlanta he has Islamic businesses, masjids, and communities that he's biult from the ground up, he's studied over sea's in Sudan, and he lead a delegation of 100's from America to Hajj. 

So infact, he is actually one of the most important American figures of 60's era, he is an icon in the African American community, and his influence is still large today in the Muslim community.

n this stops him looking like a hamster because.............

*insert "shut up newbie" comment here*


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Machiavelli

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haha that guy looks funny like a hamster or something. is he a terrorist?

LMAO....He does look funny, I cant explain what he looks like but I guess you say a hamster lol...He has one big ass no tho...