Author Topic: RIP Shock G  (Read 1700 times)

Victory

Its 1996 in here, all the time. Shock G is in his prime. Whatever are you talking about?
Picture me trollin in my 500 Benz...
 

Sccit

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2021, 09:50:02 AM »
 

SuperSpider

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2021, 10:28:21 AM »
Damn, death really does come in threes......RIP Shock G  :'(
 

Victory

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2021, 10:49:03 AM »
Damn, death really does come in threes......RIP Shock G  :'(

Because they were murdered by the vaccine. No tinfoil, just facts.
Picture me trollin in my 500 Benz...
 

The Predator

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Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2021, 10:56:24 AM »
Not Humpty too  :(




Quote
Shock G, co-founder of hip-hop group Digital Underground, dies aged 57

Rapper scored a US hit with raunchy single The Humpty Dance, and produced some of 2Pac’s early work


US rapper Shock G, who as co-founder of Digital Underground was one of the most colourful figures in the early hip-hop scene, has died aged 57.

According to TMZ, he was found in a hotel room in Tampa, Florida, though no cause of death has yet been ascertained. His co-founder Chopmaster J wrote on Instagram: “34 years ago almost to the day we had a wild idea we can be a hip hop band and take on the world through it all … long live Shock G AKA Humpty Hump and Rest In Peace my Brotha.”

Shock G was born Greg Jacobs in 1963 in New York, where he returned after a childhood spell in Tampa to attend high school – he learned to be a DJ amid the city’s nascent hip-hop scene. On returning to Florida, having also learned piano, he shuttled between solo gigs and groups as a young man.

His next move was to California, eventually settling in Oakland where he formed Digital Underground in with his Florida collaborator and DJ Kenny K (Kenneth Waters), and producer and drummer Chopmaster J (Jimi Dright Jr). They scored a minor early hit with Doowutchyalike in 1989 after signing to Tommy Boy records.

The group had their biggest hit the following year: The Humpty Dance, with Jacobs going by the lascivious, hilarious, nasal alter ego Humpty Hump (“pronounced with a umpty”), making raunchy sexual promises amid lurid food metaphors. It reached No 11 in the US singles chart, with the album Sex Packets reaching No 24.

The group released five further albums. The 1991 EP, This Is an EP Release, also went Top 30, and is notable for featuring the first credited appearance of Tupac Shakur – he rapped the final verse of the track Same Song, and appeared in the track’s video.

Jacobs and Shakur, as 2Pac, continued to collaborate, with Jacobs producing his breakthrough track I Get Around as well as two tracks from his 1991 debut, 2Pacalypse Now: Tha Lunatic and Words of Wisdom. Jacobs also produced So Many Tears from the 1995 album Me Against the World.

He also produced work for the rappers Murs, Luniz and KRS-One, and for Prince, with the song Love Sign. He released a solo album, Fear of a Mixed Planet, in 2004.

Tributes have been paid by Bootsy Collins, who credited Jacobs with continuing the style of funk Collins began with the group Parliament-Funkadelic: “Oh No, Not Shock G (and his alter ego Humpty Hump). He helped keep P Funk Alive!”

El-P, from the group Run the Jewels, said Jacobs was the “coolest, most down to earth icon/hero of mine i’ve ever had the pleasure to meet. a kind and pure musical genius.” Rapper Immortal Technique called him “a pioneer and an innovator”. The singer, instrumentalist and Prince collaborator Sheila E said: “You did so much for the bay [area] once u created Digital Underground. We honor u and we will miss u.”

Quote
Shock G, Frontman for Hip-Hop Group Digital Underground, Dies at 57

The group had a string of hits in the 1990s, including “The Humpty Dance,” and helped introduce a little-known rapper named Tupac Shakur.

Gregory Edward Jacobs, known as Shock G, the frontman for the influential hip-hop group Digital Underground, was found dead on Thursday at a hotel in Tampa, Fla. He was 57.

His death was confirmed by the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office, which did not provide a cause.

Digital Underground had a string of hits in the early 1990s and introduced its audience to a little-known rapper named Tupac Shakur. The group’s name sounded like “a band of outlaws from a cyberpunk novel,” with a sound that “straddles the line between reality and fantasy, between silliness and social commentary,” The New York Times wrote in 1991. “Digital Underground is where Parliament left off,” Shock G said at the time, referring to the groundbreaking George Clinton band.

Shock G had been shuttling from his home in Tampa to Northern California in 1987 when the group made a self-released single, “Underwater Rimes.” That helped get the attention of Tommy Boy Records, which released Digital Underground’s first album, “Sex Packets.” It sold a million copies and featured the hit single “The Humpty Dance.”

The album stood out for melding funk and jazz riffs on top of catchy drumbeats. And with Shock G’s lanky frame and toothy grin, the group had a visual aesthetic ripe for the dawn of the music video generation. Shock G, who produced music in addition to rapping, was known for spinning different personas, depending on his surroundings.

In the video for “The Humpty Dance,” Shock G took on the persona of Humpty Hump, the title character, donning a pair of dark-rimmed glasses with an obviously fake nose, a fur hat and tie. “I’m sick wit dis, straight gangsta mack/But sometimes I get ridiculous,” he raps on the song. “I’ll eat up all your crackers and your licorice/Hey yo fat girl, come here — are ya ticklish?” Part of the hook for the song: “Do the Humpty Hump, come on and do the Humpty Hump.”

Shock G can be seen in a similar outfit, both goofy and suave, in the video for the group’s song, “Doowutchyalike,” where he encouraged listeners to let loose and enjoy themselves as a saxophone gently riffs over the beat.

Shock G’s most lasting impact on hip-hop and music may have come when the group released the hit “Same Song,” which was Mr. Shakur’s “first vocal appearance on a song,” according to Genius.com. Shock G, who appears first on the song, once again cast himself as the good-time host. “I came for the party to get naughty, get my rocks on/Eat popcorn, watch you move your body to the pop song.”

When it was Mr. Shakur’s turn, he quickly unleashed a thoughtful verse about the dangers of success: “Get some fame, people change.”

Mr. Shakur had auditioned for Shock G and was hired to be a member of the group’s road crew. He eventually performed and recorded with Digital Underground, appearing on the group’s “This Is an EP Release” (Tommy Boy), and “Sons of the P” (Tommy Boy), which was nominated for a Grammy Award.

In 1991, Mr. Shakur started a solo recording career with the album “2Pacalypse Now” (Interscope), which sold half a million copies. It included two modest hits, “Trapped” and “Brenda’s Got a Baby,” a song about an unwed teenage mother’s plight. Before the album was released, he also started a career as a movie actor, playing the violent, unpredictable Bishop in the Ernest Dickerson film “Juice.”

By 1993, Mr. Shakur was a rising star. Shock G and another Digital Underground member, Money B, appeared on Mr. Shakur’s album, helping create his first major hit, “I Get Around,” a poolside anthem with scantily clad women and a laid-back beat. But now, it was Shock G, sporting an Afro and oversized purple T-shirt, with the message: “Now you can tell from my everyday fits I ain’t rich/So cease and desist with them tricks/I’m just another Black man caught up in the mix/Tryna make a dollar out of 15 cents.”

Shock G’s musical instincts were forged by a childhood spent moving around the country. His mother worked as a television producer and his father worked as an executive in computer management. After the couple divorced, “I spent my biggest chunk of time in Tampa but I also lived in New York, Philly and California,” Shock G had told The Times. “I have always been into music and played in bands starting when I was 10 or 11.”

His grandmother, Gloria Ali, was a pianist and cabaret singer in Harlem in the 1950s. She taught him how to play “Round Midnight” on the piano. Then, as hip-hop began to gain traction in New York in the late 1970s, Shock G, who was living there at the time, recalled, “All of my friends and I sold our instruments to buy mixers and turntables.”

Shock G, who was born in Brooklyn on Aug. 25, 1963, is survived by his father, Edward Racker, his mother, Shirley Kraft, his sister, Elizabeth Racker, and his brother, Kent Racker.

Shock G saw music as expansive, inclusive and experimental. “Funk can be rock, funk can be jazz and funk can be soul,” he told The Times. “Most people have a checklist of what makes a good pop song: it has to be three minutes long, it must have a repeatable chorus and it must have a catchy hook. That’s what makes music stale. We say ‘Do what feels good.’ If you like it for three minutes, then you’ll love it for 30.”

Quote
Shock G, ‘Humpty Hump’ of Digital Underground, Dies at 57


Shock G, producer and frontman of the 1990s hip-hop group Digital Underground and widely known for his alter-ego “Humpty Hump,” has died, according to a statement from his family. The artist, whose real name was Gregory Jacobs, was 57; no cause of death has been confirmed.

“Our son, brother and friend, Gregory Jacobs, also known as Shock G, suddenly passed away today,” his family wrote in a statement. “The cause of death is currently unknown. We truly, truly appreciate all the outpouring of love and concern. Please keep us in your prayers at this very difficult time.”

Via hits like “The Humpy Dance,” Digital Underground were leaders of the Bay Area hip-hop scene of the late ‘80s and early 1990s. But their catalog also marked the recorded debut of Tupac Shakur, who was briefly a member of the group before the release of his 1991 solo album. He is featured on “Same Song” from the “This Is an EP Release” EP.

Chopmaster J wrote: “34 years ago almost to the day we had a wild idea: We can be a hip hop band and take on the world,” he captioned an old photo of Shock G. “Through it all the dream became a reality and the reality became a nightmare for some. And now he’s awaken from the fame. Long live Shock G, aka Humpty Hump. And Rest In Peace my Brotha, Greg Jacobs!!!”

Born in Brooklyn, Jacobs bounced between New York and Tampa, Florida, as a child. An acolyte of both funk and early hip-hop, Jacobs had a brief stint as a radio DJ while still in high school, and developed a proficiency with a variety of instruments – keyboard, turntables, drums – during an itinerant young adulthood which saw him drift across the country working odd jobs. Returning home to Tampa, he studied music theory at community college, and eventually moved west to Oakland, Calif.

It was there that Shock G and Chopmaster J formed Digital Underground with Kenny K in the late 1980s. The group broke through in 1989 with singles “Doowhutchyalike” and “The Humpty Dance,” the video for which featured Shock G in his Humpty guise, adopting a blubbery, cartoonish voice and performing with a fake nose and glasses. Humpty was merely one of Shock G’s multiple on-record alter-egos, though he was so fully developed that many of the group’s early listeners were unaware that Shock G and Humpty Hump were the same person.

While Parliament-Funkadelic would be sampled countless times during hip-hop’s golden era, few hip-hop outfits embodied George Clinton’s extraterrestrial strangeness and cracked humor as thoroughly as Digital Underground. With outré costumes, bizarre sci-fi concepts and an elaborate stage show, the group combined serious musical chops with a deeply unserious worldview, and their debut full-length, 1990’s loose concept album “Sex Packets,” was very much of a piece with De La Soul’s “3 Feet High and Rising” and the Beastie Boys’ “Paul’s Boutique” from the previous year – three hip-hop records whose freewheeling humor initially obscured just how musically innovative and adventurous they were. Largely on the strength of the two Humpty singles, “Sex Packets” went platinum, and its success saw the group make appearances on “The Arsenio Hall Show,” “Drexell’s Class,” and the Chevy Chase-Demi Moore comedy “Nothing But Trouble.”

Digital Underground never equaled the success of “Sex Packets,” though their second release, “This Is Not an EP Release,” would have just as firm a place in the history books for featuring the first appearance of a young Tupac Shakur. Initially joining the group as a dancer and roadie, Shakur notched his first appearance on record with the final verse of Digital Underground’s “Same Song.” Though his time with the group was short, Shakur would call on Shock G to produce and perform on tracks throughout his early solo career, including his first major hit, “I Get Around.”

Digital Underground’s second full-length, “Sons of the P,” met with less success, and while the group continued into the ‘00s, its moment had largely passed. The group’s most recent release, a live album, dropped in 2008. However, Shock G was extremely active as a producer, working with Dr. Dre, Bobby Brown, Luniz, Murs and others, as well as touring with his hero George Clinton.

Quote
Shock G, who got his own dance as Humpty Hump in rap group Digital Underground, dies at 57


Shock G, the rapper, songwriter and producer who helped take hip-hop into the pop mainstream in the early 1990s with “The Humpty Dance” by his Oakland-based group Digital Underground, has died, according to an Instagram post by his former bandmate Chopmaster J.

The rapper, born Gregory Jacobs, was found dead Thursday in a hotel room in Tampa, Fla., TMZ reported, attributing the news to Jacobs’ father, who didn’t state a cause. He was 57.

Performing as his alter ego Humpty Hump — “pronounced with a ‘umpty,’” as he advised in the song — Shock G struck a proudly comic pose in “The Humpty Dance,” bragging with exaggerated style about his skinny frame and his sexual prowess (“I once got busy in a Burger King bathroom”) as he encouraged listeners to follow his lead in the titular dance, which he called “your chance to do the hump.”

Built on prominent samples of tunes by Parliament and Sly & the Family Stone, “The Humpty Dance” topped Billboard’s rap singles chart for five weeks in 1990 and went to No. 11 on the all-genre Hot 100, where it was surrounded by hits such as Madonna’s “Vogue,” MC Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This” and “This Old Heart of Mine” by Rod Stewart and Ronald Isley. The song was also nominated for a Grammy Award for rap performance by a duo or group.

“The Humpty Dance’s” success was driven in part by its music video, a staple of early-’90s MTV in which Shock G wore his trademark prosthetic nose and in which a young Tupac Shakur can be seen as one of Digital Underground’s backup dancers. Shakur went on to make his debut appearance as an MC in the group’s 1991 track “Same Song.”
Prince over the years


Shock G worried later in life that his over-the-top image from the “Humpty Dance” video distracted viewers from his musical talent. “My nightmare was that I was going to OD onstage as Humpty, and they were going to leave me in the coffin with the nose on and put on the tombstone ‘Humpty Hump,’” he told Vibe magazine in 2005.

Yet his lighthearted approach — as captured on Digital Underground’s platinum-selling 1990 debut, “Sex Packets,” which featured another classic of the era in the rambunctious “Doowutchyalike” — endeared the group to fans of similarly quirky hip-hop outfits such as De La Soul and A Tribe Called Quest.

In a tweet Thursday, Ice Cube called Shock G — whose death closely follows those of fellow hip-hop veterans DMX and Black Rob — “a true Bay Area original,” while MC Hammer hailed his “incredible vision.” El-P of Run the Jewels called him “a kind and pure musical genius” and said he was the “coolest, most down-to-earth icon/hero of mine I’ve ever had the pleasure to meet.”

Jacobs was born on Aug. 25, 1963, in Brooklyn, N.Y. He spent time as a keyboardist and a DJ before he landed in Oakland and formed Digital Underground with Chopmaster J and Kenny K. The group set out to make “nonconformist hip-hop,” as Shock G told Spin magazine at the time. “We just try to be in tune to all forms of music. R&B, jazz, rock ’n’ roll, hip-hop. Like Funkadelic, we wanted to use all our influences on one record.”

For “Sex Packets,” which Digital Underground produced itself — and which Vibe put on a 2008 list of “51 albums that changed the game” — the group repeatedly sampled Parliament and Funkadelic, whose flamboyant bassist Bootsy Collins said Thursday on Twitter that Shock G “helped keep P Funk alive!” “The Humpty Dance” in turn was sampled by dozens of hip-hop acts including LL Cool J, Kriss Kross, Gang Starr and Das EFX.

Digital Underground continued to release albums throughout the ’90s, while Shock G cultivated a career as a producer outside the group. He co-produced Shakur’s 1991 debut album, “2Pacalypse Now,” and co-wrote and co-produced Shakur’s “I Get Around” single, which went to No. 11 on the Hot 100 in 1993. He also worked with Prince on Prince’s 2008 “Crystal Ball” box set and with rappers Murs and Yukmouth.

In 2004 he released a solo album called “Fear of a Mixed Planet.”

Information on survivors beyond his father wasn’t immediately available.




Quote
"The Humpty Dance" is one of the most sampled songs recorded by a hip hop/rap artist, boasting over 100 usages in other songs. By 1993, less than three years after its release, it had already been sampled in over 20 popular songs, most of them utilizing its drum track. In fact, it was sampled so much that Digital Underground humorously devoted the song "The Humpty Dance Awards" from their album The Body-Hat Syndrome to the many recording artists who sampled the track. Since then, dozens more artists have sampled the Humpty Dance song, from Ice Cube to Public Enemy.

sampled by (Rap) -

    "A Crazy Break" – WC & the Maad Circle (full drum loop)
    "Ain't That a Bitch" – Kam (full drum loop)
    "Assata's Song (Remix)" – Paris (full drum loop on bridge)
    "Attention: The Shawanda Story" – Lo-Key? (full drum loop)
    "Back to the Underground" – WC & the Maad Circle (vocal, snare & kicks used in drum track)
    "Behind Closed Doors" – WC & the Maad Circle (raw instrumental used as their drum track)
    "Blow Your Mind" – Redman (drum loop)
    "Boom! Shake the Room" – Will Smith (drum track looped underneath as kick drum support)
    "Buck tha Devil – Da Lench Mob (full drum loop)
    "Bumbell" – Yukmouth feat. Tech N9ne (bassline)
    "Can't Truss It" – Public Enemy (full drum loop)
    "Cherish the Day" (Best of Sade version) – Sade (raw instrumental used as drum track in last 30 secs of song)
    "Christmas Spliff" – Luke (full drum loop)
    "City to City" – Straw tha Vegas Don feat. Shock G (raw instrumental scratched in first verse)
    "Cotex" – BWP (full drum loop; looped in reverse)
    "Curse" – Recoil
    "D.O.G. Me Out" – Guy (piece of loop, muted, as kick drum support)
    "Dirty Water" - Made in London (full drum loop)
    "Don't Be Afraid (Jazz You Up Version)" – Aaron Hall (full drum loop)
    "Dr. Trevis (Signs Off)" – Redman (bit of drum loop underneath)
    "Drive-By (Rollin' Slow)" – Boss (full drum loop)
    "Flip Squad's in da House" – Big Kap, Flip Squad, Funkmaster Flex (full drum loop & bassline)
    "Funk Mobb Niggaz" – Little Bruce (full drum loop)
    "Get a Little Freaky with Me" – Aaron Hall (full drum loop)
    "Here We Go Again" – Portrait (raw instrumental as their drum track)
    "His Story" – TLC (full drum loop)
    "Hold Onto My Bumper" – Dice (full drum loop)
    "Holiday Madness" – Kam (full drum loop)
    "How I'm Comin'" – LL Cool (full drum loop)
    "How Ya Gonna Reason With a Psycho" – Insane Poetry (full drum loop)
    "I Made Love (4 Da Very First Time)" – Little Shawn (drum track doubled up)
    "If U Can't Dance" – Spice Girls (drum loop & bassline)

   

    "I'm Outstanding" – Shaquille O'Neal (drum track looped underneath as support)
    "Imma Gitz Mine" – Erick Sermon (chopped & muted drum bit underneath; kick drum support)
    "Is It Good to You" – Heavy-D & the Boys (full drum loop)
    "Jackin' For Beats" – Ice Cube (raw instrumental)
    "Live and Learn" – Joe Public (full drum loop)
    "Lost in the Storm" – Chubb Rock (raw instrumental used as their drum track)
    "Love Don't Make Sense" – Alexander O'Neal (full drum loop)
    "Love Sick" – Gang Starr (vocal sample scratched in choruses)
    "Mama Said Knock You Out" – LL Cool J (full drum loop)
    "Night of a Thousand Furry Toys" – Richard Wright (full drum loop)
    "Not Your Money" – Oaktowns 357 (full drum loop)
    "Nothin'" – Gold Money (full drum loop)
    "PlayGround" – ABC (full loop, muted, used for kick drum support)
    "Public Service Announcement" – Jay-Z (lyrics & rhyme cadence interpolation)
    "Really Doe" – Ice Cube (bit of drum track underneath)
    "SMPTE" – The Boys (full drum loop)
    "Stop What Ya Doin'" – Apathy (one full bar length vocal & music sample)
    "Teddy's Jam 2" – Guy (full loop)
    "The Break Up" – WC & the Maad Circle (full drum loop)
    "The Humpty Dance Awards" – Digital Underground (full drum loop & bassline)
    "The Money is Made" – Detroit's Most Wanted (full drum loop)
    "Time 4 Sum Aksion" – Redman (drum track chopped underneath; kick drum support)
    "Two 4 the Time" – Nubian Crackers (raw instrumental as their drum track)
    "Walk Thru Hell" – K-Stone (raw full instrumental)
    "What About Your Friends" – TLC (drum track looped underneath for support)
    "Who's the Mack?" – Ice Cube (vocal sample)
    "Witchhunt" - Godflesh (drum loop & bassline)
    "You Gotta Believe" – Marky Mark & the Funky Bunch (full drum loop)
    "Young N*ggaz" - 2Pac (drum track underneath)
« Last Edit: April 23, 2021, 11:07:09 AM by The Predator »
 
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The Predator

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Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2021, 11:43:47 AM »
Quote
Ice Cube
@icecube
·

RIP Shock-G/Humpty Hump. I remember when NWA’s road manager Atron said he had a group called Digital Underground. He played DOWHATCHALIKE video & I went crazy. I had to sample DU on JACKIN FOR BEATS and WHO’S THE MACK. And nobody had a better stage show. A true Bay Area original.
 

Sccit

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2021, 02:01:24 PM »
 

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2021, 03:14:26 PM »
I really want to know this too. This is a very legit question! He probably died out of nothing from one or more vaccines he recently took, just like DMX. >:( :( :'(

Yeah bro no doubt... Because Bill Gates goons in the media and big tech media are censoring and scrubbing any vaxx related deaths... they did it to Marvin Hagler and did it to DMX... and countless others...

I’m not saying it’s true in this case — all I’m saying is it’s suspicious when I’m seeing 100’s of reports on him dying and celebrating his life—yet no mention of the cause of death—and we are talking about a man who was not old and not known to have any health issues
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Ain't trying to stick around for Illuminati (One World Government Takeover) / Got to buy my own island by the year 2-G

******
 

Hellquist

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2021, 05:18:58 PM »
Three legendary rappers dying within 2 weeks of each other? Please stop the madness. Digital Underground's albums still hold up to this day. Highly underrated group. Shock G was also an underrated producer in his own right and never gets brought up for his production. He truly will be missed. One of the smartest, most imaginative rappers in the rap game in the golden age of hip hop, not just on the west.
 

U.N.T.O.U.C.H.A.B.L.E.

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2021, 10:54:03 PM »
Spoke to a friend of mine back in Cali that lived down the street from Shock, sadly Shock was hooked on drugs & he never got over Pac's death (we all never did) but yea looks like it might have been meth  :'( :'(
but ill confirm when i get solid news from my man again this is what he thinks happened cause Shock left Cali to come to Tampa & Tampa got a lotta meth heads    :'( :'(

Infinite Trapped in 1996

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Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2021, 12:02:52 AM »
Spoke to a friend of mine back in Cali that lived down the street from Shock, sadly Shock was hooked on drugs & he never got over Pac's death (we all never did) but yea looks like it might have been meth  :'( :'(
but ill confirm when i get solid news from my man again this is what he thinks happened cause Shock left Cali to come to Tampa & Tampa got a lotta meth heads    :'( :'(

Props for the report...

...and ask if he recently took the vaxx
*******

"I will make records as big or bigger than Death Row".   -Dre, Source 1996

"I didn't do nothing but make people money and I didn't leave nobody high and dry.  Any album (on death row) people are going to check for.  But it's time for Dre to worry about Dre.  I'm focused on the new Snoop Doggs, not like that but you know what I mean."

Dre -  Source 1996 cover

"Ain't trying to stick around for Illuminati (One World Government Takeover) / Got to buy my own island by the year 2-G

******
 

BJv

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2021, 08:10:40 AM »
Spoke to a friend of mine back in Cali that lived down the street from Shock, sadly Shock was hooked on drugs & he never got over Pac's death (we all never did) but yea looks like it might have been meth  :'( :'(
but ill confirm when i get solid news from my man again this is what he thinks happened cause Shock left Cali to come to Tampa & Tampa got a lotta meth heads    :'( :'(

When Shock retired I remember him saying in an interview that making music leads him to do drugs and that's why he retired.
 

Victory

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2021, 10:31:05 AM »
Shocked that Shock was on Meth. Sherm or something similar I could see fitting his demeanor but he never seemed like a tweaker as he came across so mellow.

Do you have a link to that interview?
Picture me trollin in my 500 Benz...
 

U.N.T.O.U.C.H.A.B.L.E.

Re: RIP Shock G
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2021, 11:37:54 AM »
Props for the report...

...and ask if he recently took the vaxx

Ill ask him that thanks for the reminder X & Black Rob did take the vaccine & look at em now