Author Topic: EMINEM - THE DEATH OF SLIM SHADY [COUP DE GRACE] (Official Discussion)  (Read 4869 times)

TraceOneInfinite Flat Earther 96'

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"Rappers Delight" type style

all those lead singles were cut from the same cloth...even though they were dope

I always liked Ems lead singles but it was the other joints on the album that I preferred

Not every song is supposed to be dark and brooding and screaming his head off, or trying to prove how fast he can rap and how many rhymes and multis he can fit into each bar, then every song would be like "Rap God" or like "Way I Am".

Nothing wrong with having a lead single that's a bit more of a simple format.  "Without Me", "My Name Is", and "Real Slim Shady" are all great songs and great lead singles.  I wouldn't disparage them by calling them hippityhop
Givin' respect to 2pac September 7th-13th The Day Hip-Hop Died

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HighEyeCue

Not every song is supposed to be dark and brooding and screaming his head off, or trying to prove how fast he can rap and how many rhymes and multis he can fit into each bar, then every song would be like "Rap God" or like "Way I Am".

Nothing wrong with having a lead single that's a bit more of a simple format.  "Without Me", "My Name Is", and "Real Slim Shady" are all great songs and great lead singles.  I wouldn't disparage them by calling them hippityhop

yeah I don't know if Sccit meant it in a disparaging way...he could explain it better

as for me yeah those lead singles were very dope but because of their commercial aspect they were played to death everywhere you went that eventually I got a little tired of them

I'm more of an album listener anyway I like to just vibe to the whole project


 

Duck Duck Doggy

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This is nostalgic - not a great song by any means, average in fact but it’s extremely nostalgic and does sound like a real Eminem first single - almost reminds me of why we all hated Eminem first singles at one stage past real slim shady apart from lose yourself - I can imagine this blowing up for a while and then dying down due to nostalgia but not being a very good song. This aint even close to fucking with joints like euphoria or not like us. However it has huge nostalgic value and it’s a nice reminder of his better days. He hasn’t released an album worth listening top to bottom since Eminem show so maybe he got something this time. Dre involved too supposedly.

On a side note if you check his IG and the comments - you can see how embarrassing his fan base is/has become and the demographics of it real quick. They don’t know shit about hiphop

Yeah I noticed a lot of his new fans are more familiar with Em post Relapse. It was around Recovery/ MMLP2 when he started rapping in his new style. Like sccit said there’s hints of that in the new single but he’s clearly striving for the old em and we get hints of it when he does that layered harmonizing briefly in verse 2 I think. And the chorus. I think Em still has potent for that vintage sound if Dre is involved

Also it seems like Em hijacked the missionary album with his and Dre has been very supportive and involved with Em album. Ever since Dre announced the Em album missionary was over
 

Sccit

hippity hop shit?? What's that supposed to mean.  You mean like a targeted single, or a contrived single?  Or just anything that isn't dark and brooding?  Was the original "Without Me" too hippity hop?


hippity hop = trying hard to show how lyrical he can be, fitting in as many rhymes as possible in each bar, sacrificing the overall punch and meaning for display of technical skills

basically what em has been doing for the past decade or so

TraceOneInfinite Flat Earther 96'

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hippity hop = trying hard to show how lyrical he can be, fitting in as many rhymes as possible in each bar, sacrificing the overall punch and meaning for display of technical skills

basically what em has been doing for the past decade or so

in that case then I agree.  See, higheyecue and I thought you meant something else.

Yeah... I thought his format on MMLP2 was good.  Because he had a song like Rap God where he did what you call "hippityhop" by fitting as many rhymes in each bar, showing how fast he could rap.

But then he had other songs like "Legacy" or "Stronger than I Was" where the goal was just to make a great song, not trying to outdo another rapper lyrically or to gain credibility with headz in some sort of Top 5 MC's all time argument. 
Givin' respect to 2pac September 7th-13th The Day Hip-Hop Died

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Sccit

in that case then I agree.  See, higheyecue and I thought you meant something else.

Yeah... I thought his format on MMLP2 was good.  Because he had a song like Rap God where he did what you call "hippityhop" by fitting as many rhymes in each bar, showing how fast he could rap.

But then he had other songs like "Legacy" or "Stronger than I Was" where the goal was just to make a great song, not trying to outdo another rapper lyrically or to gain credibility with headz in some sort of Top 5 MC's all time argument.


the best song on mmlp2 was brainless

which is better than this new joint

TraceOneInfinite Flat Earther 96'

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the best song on mmlp2 was brainless

which is better than this new joint

No argument there, "Brainless" was spectacular.  Almost like an update of "Brain Damage" that actually improved on the original.  Unlike this track that is not even half of "Without Me."
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HighEyeCue

What do you all think was Ems best song in the last 20 years? (post Encore)

my pick would be a little surprising

 

TraceOneInfinite Flat Earther 96'

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What do you all think was Ems best song in the last 20 years? (post Encore)

my pick would be a little surprising

^^thing is homie that "Beautiful" is really technically the last song of that era for Em.  Dogg is kind of wrong in saying Relapse, because actually he was using some weird accent and changed his style for Relapse but Eminem said "Beautiful" was like and old song and I think it was his last with the Bass Brothers who were such an intrical part of his career and defining Eminem's sound in his prime from SSEP up thru 8 Mile

I keep saying it again and again but this track gets no love on here—it was a single and it’s the same kind of track like “Lose Yourself” or “Beautiful” or “Not Afraid” or “8 Mile Rd”, “Legacy”—his best since Proof died is…

“Guts Over Fear”
« Last Edit: June 02, 2024, 01:04:17 PM by TraceOneInfinite Flat Earther 96' »
Givin' respect to 2pac September 7th-13th The Day Hip-Hop Died

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The following users thanked this post: HighEyeCue

Lucifuge

Its a catchy banger. Goofy as fuck. Updated slim
ALESSANDRO DEL PIERO!!!

Detox 2000Never

tyranasaurus rex like fuck a bitch
i once saw a pterdactyl fuck a bitch
eat a bowl these bitch gobbling dick
hoes forgot to eat a dick a shut the fuck up
roll through crenshaw on my pterdactyl like what up!
By kevin t as Kurupt :D
 

Jay_J

What do you all think was Ems best song in the last 20 years? (post Encore)

my pick would be a little surprising



if we look at the charts its something else for example "Love the way you lie", but to me personally it is "Lucky You" or "Never Love Again".
 

HighEyeCue

^^thing is homie that "Beautiful" is really technically the last song of that era for Em.  Dogg is kind of wrong in saying Relapse, because actually he was using some weird accent and changed his style for Relapse but Eminem said "Beautiful" was like and old song and I think it was his last with the Bass Brothers who were such an intrical part of his career and defining Eminem's sound in his prime from SSEP up thru 8 Mile

I keep saying it again and again but this track gets no love on here—it was a single and it’s the same kind of track like “Lose Yourself” or “Beautiful” or “Not Afraid” or “8 Mile Rd”, “Legacy”—his best since Proof died is…

“Guts Over Fear”

yeah you are correct it is an older track

sounds nothing like the stuff Em was doing on Relapse

the thing about that album though is that I loved Dres production on it but I wonder if those beats were older as well
 

dnjp4life

The best Eminem track of recent times to me is The Ringer from Kamikaze - just an exceptional display of lyrical prowess, rhyme schemes flow, breath control etc.  If I was a rapper I would study that track and hope to be half as good as that.

This new one, Houdini, is pretty good, a great way to bridge the old and new fans, especially with the accompanying video.  I'm not overly enthusiastic about it, but I know the album will come with other tracks that I'll enjoy a lot more.
 

The Predator

Quote
Guess who’s back? How Eminem is storming to the top of the charts again

His new song Houdini is set to be the fastest-selling single of the year, eclipsing even Taylor Swift – despite being ignored by rap fans and radio stations alike



Houdini. Reviews were lukewarm to woeful. “Eminem loses the magic,” ran the headline in the New York Times, while website Stereogum went for the more straightforward “Eminem’s New Song ‘Houdini’ Is Really, Really Bad”, criticising everything from the “stilted” rapping to a lyrical joke about the incident when Megan Thee Stallion was shot in the foot by her fellow rapper Tory Lanez.

The public’s response was quite the opposite. A week on, it is the most-streamed song in the UK and guaranteed to become Eminem’s 11th UK No 1. It is both his fastest-selling single in 22 years, and on track to become the UK’s fastest-selling single of the year by anyone, including Taylor Swift.

Regardless of your views on the single’s quality, it’s easy to see why Houdini has been a hit. It is very commercial, based around an immediately recognisable sample from Steve Miller Band’s Abracadabra. And it plays to an ongoing vogue for early 00s musical nostalgia that has found its expression in the resurgent popularity of pop-punk and a rise in rap singles borrowing from the era’s pop and R&B hits: more than anything Eminem has released in recent years, Houdini harks back to his early days.

It heavily references his 2002 hit Without Me, while its video features 50 Cent, who was catapulted to huge sales, with the help of Eminem’s patronage, back in 2003. It precedes an album that mentions his notorious alter ego in its title – The Death of Slim Shady (Coup De Grâce), due later in the summer – and it reverts back to the old Eminem formula of making queasy, cartoonish, controversy-provoking jokes, following a period in which the rapper seemed more interested in fulminating at the latterday state of hip-hop (as on 2018’s Kamikaze) or unleashing the deeply improbable concept of a woke Slim Shady. (In 2016 and 2017, he released a string of anti-Trump tracks that took in the subjects of immigration, gun control and white supremacy.)

Moreover, years of middling and negative reviews have done little to dent Eminem’s popularity. His last album, 2020’s Music to Be Murdered By, sold 4m copies globally, while Kamikaze was the biggest-selling hip-hop album of 2018 in the US. His greatest hits collection, Curtain Call, is the solitary hip-hop album to enjoy the UK chart ubiquity usually reserved for august artists such as Fleetwood Mac, Queen or Elton John: it has spent a staggering 620 weeks in the British album charts.

His ongoing success is rendered a little strange by the fact that he no longer seems to be a central figure in contemporary rap culture. The days when Eminem was discussed 159 times in the pages of the New York Times in one year – as apparently happened in 2002 – are long behind him, and however successful Houdini may be, it seems unlikely to prove as influential as his 2000 hit Stan, which gave the English language a new word for toxic die-hard fans. Hip-hop tends to move fast, constantly throwing up new stars and styles, and when it comes to generating controversy, Eminem has long since been outstripped by the behaviour of Kanye West.

Longstanding British hip-hop DJ Semtex calls Eminem “one of the rap gods”, but says he “didn’t pay attention” when Houdini was released, and was unsure even whether to play it on his weekly Capital Xtra show. “It doesn’t fit in with anything else, with either the UK or US sound. The kids are streaming Central Cee and Lil Baby right now.” Moreover, it’s “not creatively great. As a fan, I think: you could have done more, bro.”

He suggests Eminem’s audience aren’t the kind of mainstream hip-hop fans who hung on every insult thrown during the recent row between Drake and Kendrick Lamar, but rather “ageing Eminem stans” drawn in by Houdini’s familiarity, and the peculiar cosiness of its controversy-mongering. “Talking about Megan Thee Stallion looks like it’s controversial but it actually isn’t. Talk about Diddy being arrested; talk about Drake and Kendrick, if you want to go in on hip-hop. Macklemore’s onstage speech in Germany talking about Palestine and the Holocaust – that’s shock. I watched that and thought – wow, he took it there.”

There is undoubtedly some truth in what Semtex says but it can’t be the whole story. Last year, streams of Eminem’s 2004 single Mockingbird suddenly surged to over 1.5bn after it became a huge viral hit on TikTok, a platform far more popular with teenagers than anyone old enough to remember Eminem’s heyday first-hand.

Lee Thompson, of music industry website Record of the Day, suggests Eminem’s appeal “spans three generations”, and notes that the single has barely been playlisted on UK radio. “It’s another example of the attentive, younger-skewed streaming audience being way ahead of the disconnected old gatekeepers,” he says. “Eminem was absolutely huge with the 15-19 age bracket when he first emerged. They’re now in their early 40s, probably with a teenage kid or two living at home with them in 2024, and that influence will have rubbed off on them, no question.”

It’s an intriguing thought. There might be a generation for whom Slim Shady isn’t redolent of parent-scaring nihilism, but of their actual parents: of childhood journeys in the car soundtracked by Stan or My Name Is. And perhaps their parents weren’t mainstream hip-hop fans 20 years ago – just Eminem fans. In Anthony Bozza’s authoritative 2004 biography, Whatever You Say I Am, he identifies a moment when the rapper’s audience changed from sceptical Black crowds won over by his sheer talent, to fans who seemed more like punk or nu-metal devotees: pissed-off, opinionated and “predominantly white”. If Houdini seems at one remove from the rest of hip-hop, that’s somewhere Eminem has been for a very long time.

 

Duck Duck Doggy

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