Author Topic: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody  (Read 1095 times)

Okka

Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« on: March 01, 2017, 04:10:31 PM »


Was this song ever even recorded?
<a href="http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?</a>
 

SuperSpider

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2017, 11:56:51 PM »
No. It was never mentioned again after Snoop posted this.
 

love33

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Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2017, 11:17:41 PM »
This was a big bite off of Eminem's "DETROIT vs. EVERYBODY"

Eminem called his album that because he was referring to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, the Bad Boys, when it was Detroit vs. Everybody -- and the general feel about the Motor City in that it is a hard working Factory Town that builds the Cars that Nobody Respects (Kid Rock, D-12, Big Sean plays off that too)

LA has a lot in common with Detroit in that nobody respects Los Angeles West Coast Rap like nobody respects Detroit's image and work ethic
 

Okka

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2017, 10:41:24 AM »
This was a big bite off of Eminem's "DETROIT vs. EVERYBODY"

Eminem called his album that because he was referring to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, the Bad Boys, when it was Detroit vs. Everybody -- and the general feel about the Motor City in that it is a hard working Factory Town that builds the Cars that Nobody Respects (Kid Rock, D-12, Big Sean plays off that too)

Nah, it was only a song.

LA has a lot in common with Detroit in that nobody respects Los Angeles West Coast Rap like nobody respects Detroit's image and work ethic

What the fuck are you talkin' about?
<a href="http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.dubcnn.com/swf/mp3playerDub.swf?id=2008/december/bad_azz-as_long_as_i_can-(dubcnn).mp3&amp;artwork=badazz-player.jpg&amp;auto=1? quality=?high? pluginspage=?http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer? type=?application/x-shockwave-flash? width=?323? height=?180?</a>
 

GangstaBoogy

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2017, 09:26:33 PM »
I knew it wouldn't happen when I saw Dr. Dre's name.
"House shoes & coffee: I know the paper gone come"

 

love33

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Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2017, 12:53:25 AM »
This was a big bite off of Eminem's "DETROIT vs. EVERYBODY"

Eminem called his album that because he was referring to the Detroit Pistons in 1989, the Bad Boys, when it was Detroit vs. Everybody -- and the general feel about the Motor City in that it is a hard working Factory Town that builds the Cars that Nobody Respects (Kid Rock, D-12, Big Sean plays off that too)

Nah, it was only a song.

LA has a lot in common with Detroit in that nobody respects Los Angeles West Coast Rap like nobody respects Detroit's image and work ethic

What the fuck are you talkin' about?

There was a period in West Coast Rap after Pac died where the Mainstream Media wasn't respecting West Coast artists -- the media faded out artists like Mack 10 and Luniz on MTV and brought in Will Smith "Just The Two Of Us", Puffy & Mase dancing around in spacesuits because of Pac & B.I.G. deaths -- the West was basically blackballed for years (except for a couple Dre artists like Xzibit, The Game) -- All the other west artists like Sly Boogy, Mitchy Slick, Crooked I, Eastwood, & Bishop Lamont were all shelved -- it wasn't until Kendrick Lamar, Tabs, second revival of E-40, Wale, YG, Nef The Pharoah, Tyler The Creator, Ty Dolla $ign, and The Game being consistent did the West make its return
 

bouli77

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2017, 06:36:47 PM »
Wale isn't from LA though
 

Jay Wallace

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2017, 07:38:33 PM »
There was a period in West Coast Rap after Pac died where the Mainstream Media wasn't respecting West Coast artists -- the media faded out artists like Mack 10 and Luniz on MTV and brought in Will Smith "Just The Two Of Us", Puffy & Mase dancing around in spacesuits because of Pac & B.I.G. deaths -- the West was basically blackballed for years (except for a couple Dre artists like Xzibit, The Game) -- All the other west artists like Sly Boogy, Mitchy Slick, Crooked I, Eastwood, & Bishop Lamont were all shelved -- it wasn't until Kendrick Lamar, Tabs, second revival of E-40, Wale, YG, Nef The Pharoah, Tyler The Creator, Ty Dolla $ign, and The Game being consistent did the West make its return
 

It was less of a regional bias as it was a shift in musical trends.  Hardcore rap was getting fazed out for lighter, more flashier music.  Gangsta rap had been growing and growing since 1988 and when Pac and Big both died, rap just wasn't as in to celebrating murder as it once was.  Even in New York, there was a time when DMX couldn't get a deal because people didn't want grimy rap, they wanted what Puffy was doing.  By the late 90's, it flipped a little.  DMX was huge and Puffy's second album flopped hard. 

And the West wasn't basically blackballed.  Dre did the Up in Smoke Tour which was a national tour that had nearly all West Coast artists (except Eminem), he also had 2001, Snoop had the Eastsidaz, there was talk of NWA reunions, Nate Dogg was scoring features on hit songs, Xzibit was blowing up.  You can make Dre the argument for Xzibit being the exception but the guy got on and built momentum off his.  If it was only about Dre, it would have been magic for everyone affiliated but it wasn't.  Xzibit was neither an Aftermath artist nor signed to Interscope so he didn't even had that machine behind him. What it was was the familiar West Coast acts (and the people they were putting on) were continuing to sell records. 

And nobody fazed out Mack 10 after Biggie died.  His albums were still selling consistently well with the singles getting airplay and Priority even gave him his own label imprint plus he briefly had a movie deal. The Luniz weren't blackballed.  They simply had one bankable hit single. 
 

love33

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Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2017, 11:31:23 PM »
There was a period in West Coast Rap after Pac died where the Mainstream Media wasn't respecting West Coast artists -- the media faded out artists like Mack 10 and Luniz on MTV and brought in Will Smith "Just The Two Of Us", Puffy & Mase dancing around in spacesuits because of Pac & B.I.G. deaths -- the West was basically blackballed for years (except for a couple Dre artists like Xzibit, The Game) -- All the other west artists like Sly Boogy, Mitchy Slick, Crooked I, Eastwood, & Bishop Lamont were all shelved -- it wasn't until Kendrick Lamar, Tabs, second revival of E-40, Wale, YG, Nef The Pharoah, Tyler The Creator, Ty Dolla $ign, and The Game being consistent did the West make its return
 

It was less of a regional bias as it was a shift in musical trends.  Hardcore rap was getting fazed out for lighter, more flashier music.  Gangsta rap had been growing and growing since 1988 and when Pac and Big both died, rap just wasn't as in to celebrating murder as it once was.  Even in New York, there was a time when DMX couldn't get a deal because people didn't want grimy rap, they wanted what Puffy was doing.  By the late 90's, it flipped a little.  DMX was huge and Puffy's second album flopped hard. 

And the West wasn't basically blackballed.  Dre did the Up in Smoke Tour which was a national tour that had nearly all West Coast artists (except Eminem), he also had 2001, Snoop had the Eastsidaz, there was talk of NWA reunions, Nate Dogg was scoring features on hit songs, Xzibit was blowing up.  You can make Dre the argument for Xzibit being the exception but the guy got on and built momentum off his.  If it was only about Dre, it would have been magic for everyone affiliated but it wasn't.  Xzibit was neither an Aftermath artist nor signed to Interscope so he didn't even had that machine behind him. What it was was the familiar West Coast acts (and the people they were putting on) were continuing to sell records. 

And nobody fazed out Mack 10 after Biggie died.  His albums were still selling consistently well with the singles getting airplay and Priority even gave him his own label imprint plus he briefly had a movie deal. The Luniz weren't blackballed.  They simply had one bankable hit single. 

Great insight, I think it's true people weren't feeling gangsta rap from the record label higher ups and that trickled down into the playlists to create that temperament you described in 1998-1999, when rap was changing -- it may have been completely different if Pac and BIG were still around -- but the Gangsta Rap stock did a market crash, like you said, and DMX got a lot of play, Cash Money Records with Juvy "Ha", and "Bsck That Azz Up", "Nolia Clap" then Hot Boys, then Jay-Z JD "The Money Aint A Thang" -- It started to become flash & bling bling -- Will Smith "I'm taking a trip to Miami" replaced Mack 10 "Backyard Boogie"...Cube rode hard with club hits "You Can do It" and "We Be Thuggin"

Luniz had "Playa Hater" and Yukmouth had song hard tracks...I know it came later but "Godzilla" was one of the most slept on West Coast classics that never got no mainstream love -- I'll put that up against Xzibit anyday (both had some great songs!)
 

Jay Wallace

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2017, 06:44:56 AM »
Great insight, I think it's true people weren't feeling gangsta rap from the record label higher ups and that trickled down into the playlists to create that temperament you described in 1998-1999, when rap was changing.

I think you are putting far too much of that on record label decision-making and not paying enough attention to the reality of the cyclical nature of popular culture.  It's not the white guys in suits who decide, "Okay, we don't like gangsta rap anymore".  It's the consumer.  You could see it starting to change long before Pac's death. 

Death Row's rise to peak was from about 1991-1996.  That's five years.  If you count in the Ruthless era when gangsta rap was becoming a media sensation, that's another three years. With Ruthless becoming a house divided, you had its three major players (Dre, Cube, Eazy) all splitting up to make their own records for different labels then you'd have other labels signing whatever was hot (Def Jam scooping up Warren G, other producers building funk-sampled sounds around hard-edged content, etc.)  At some point, things got stagnant.  You could see with Dre leaving that he was done with gangsta rap at that time and him declaring it dead in interviews affected how the consumer looked at it.  Snoop was also moving in a different direction.  Now, you combine that with the two biggest artists out there both dying and I think people just grew tired of it.  Even if they had never been killed, I think musically, the consumers would have moved on if the sound stayed the same.  It happens to every label and artist. 

 

love33

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Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2017, 01:09:03 AM »
Great insight, I think it's true people weren't feeling gangsta rap from the record label higher ups and that trickled down into the playlists to create that temperament you described in 1998-1999, when rap was changing.

I think you are putting far too much of that on record label decision-making and not paying enough attention to the reality of the cyclical nature of popular culture.  It's not the white guys in suits who decide, "Okay, we don't like gangsta rap anymore".  It's the consumer.  You could see it starting to change long before Pac's death. 

Death Row's rise to peak was from about 1991-1996.  That's five years.  If you count in the Ruthless era when gangsta rap was becoming a media sensation, that's another three years. With Ruthless becoming a house divided, you had its three major players (Dre, Cube, Eazy) all splitting up to make their own records for different labels then you'd have other labels signing whatever was hot (Def Jam scooping up Warren G, other producers building funk-sampled sounds around hard-edged content, etc.)  At some point, things got stagnant.  You could see with Dre leaving that he was done with gangsta rap at that time and him declaring it dead in interviews affected how the consumer looked at it.  Snoop was also moving in a different direction.  Now, you combine that with the two biggest artists out there both dying and I think people just grew tired of it.  Even if they had never been killed, I think musically, the consumers would have moved on if the sound stayed the same.  It happens to every label and artist. 



Dre's career was as good as dead in the Mainstream when he left Death Row, before Pac & BIG even died.  Did you watch that MTV Death Row cover I had in that other post? They said that he was finished and Suge was laughing how he sold his half for a dollar and he had all the masters.  In 91, Death Row never had an album, it wasn't until somewhere in the 3rd/4th quarter that they started spinning singles for Chronic hard on MTV (I remember this as a kid being in grade school) -- "...G' Thang" quickly became the biggest track in the industry, and the album hit rap upside the head.  Good point on Warren G, Dove Shack, Twinz, and others getting deals off of Death Row's movement -- the media pled guilty behind closed doors on Pac & BIG, and Suge pointed this out when they called him and told him to "Soften his lyrics" and he refused -- You're right, Dre went soft with "Aftermath Presents.. ", which is why it didn't sell like Dre was used to (1 million vs. what Dre normally sells).  If you told me they had something to replace it with... they didn't replace Death Row with techno, they replaced it with... RAP -- DMX, Cash Money, No Limit -- they weren't West Coast G's, which is what they were trying to turn the light off on but 'Up In Smoke Tour' kept them distracted, but they kept making rap music, it was just marketed as non-gangsta and they went to the opposite side of the country back to the New York media market.  Dre went back to Gangsta Rap for "Dr. Dre 2001" and that's what got his career back up.  Like Suge said, he couldn't do it selling pop, he could only do it selling Death Row gangsta rap, which is true, which is why he put up those mad sales and brought his career back!
 

Jay Wallace

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2017, 09:46:41 PM »
Dre's career was as good as dead in the Mainstream when he left Death Row, before Pac & BIG even died. 

No, it wasn’t.  He was starting over from scratch from a creative/business standpoint but he was still in a position to make things happen.  His departure got him magazine covers.  He was at the 1996 VMA’s doing interviews but left when Pac/Suge arrived.  Interscope was backing him.  He was still in a very high demand.  He just hadn’t found his sound yet.  While “Been There, Done That” was critically, a lukewarm record, it still got spins and Dre performed it as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live. 

Did you watch that MTV Death Row cover I had in that other post? They said that he was finished and Suge was laughing how he sold his half for a dollar and he had all the masters. 

You’re confusing perception with reality.  Financially, giving up half of a multi-million-dollar company looks like a big “L” on the score card but the reality was Interscope had already secured him his own label deal, he had publishing rights on his music, and while the future of his career as a producer was uncertain, he wasn’t bankrupt and he wasn’t in a situation with the industry was no longer working with him.

In 91, Death Row never had an album, it wasn't
until somewhere in the 3rd/4th quarter that they started spinning singles for Chronic hard on MTV (I remember this as a kid being in grade school) -- "...G' Thang" quickly became the biggest track in the industry, and the album hit rap upside the head.   

Correction.  It would actually have been 1992.  Dre was still with NWA in 1991.  By 1992, the legal deals were still being worked out.  Death Row was supposed to sign a groundbreaking distribution deal with Sony that would have given them unprecedented control of their own catalog but Sony took it off the table once Eazy-E stepped in and threatened to sue any company that worked with Dre for interfering with a contracted artist.  The “Deep Cover” deal happened before Interscope/Priority came in.  This was still in the early days when Dick Griffey was going to have an ownership stake in Death Row and they were recording at Solar.  When Sony dropped out, Interscope stepped in, negotiated with Eazy and Ruthless to free up Dre’s contract, and convinced Suge to drop Dick Griffey as a business partner. 


The media pled guilty behind closed doors on Pac & BIG, and Suge pointed this out when they called him and told him to "Soften his lyrics" and he refused.

I can’t help but roll my eyes at this whole statement right here.  The media?  As if every single media conglomerate is just an individual entity that manifested itself into human form and called up Suge.  Stop drinking the cool-aid, man. As far as Suge refusing to soften his lyrics, firstly, Suge is not a recording artist so he can’t claim ownership of lyrics.  Secondly, in a Vibe article, released around the time of his prison sentencing, he admitted that he had agreed with C. DeLeroes Tucker that Death Row would no longer release albums with use of the “N” word on them.  He later, of course, reneged, but this contradicts your theory that he refused to change the music. 


You're right, Dre went soft with "Aftermath Presents.. ", which is why it didn't sell like Dre was used to (1 million vs. what Dre normally sells). 


Now, you’re applying a contradictory logic.  According to you, Death Row was “rocking the charts” with a double album that went gold, sold 400,000 copies, and didn’t have a single hit record.  Aftermath put out a single-disc compilation that went platinum, sold a million copies, and had a moderately successful radio hit.  They followed that up with another million copies, platinum plaque, and #1 chart position for The Firm project.  A million copies is flopping but 800k on a double album is rocking the charts?


If you told me they had something to replace it with... they didn't replace Death Row with techno, they replaced it with... RAP -- DMX, Cash Money, No Limit

They didn’t replace anything.  The artists who were popular at Death Row (2Pac, Dre, Snoop) were still selling.  When Death Row put out Tupac projects, they still sold.  They just didn’t have any new stars that were making hits and they didn’t have the resources to properly build them up.


They weren't West Coast G's, which is what they were trying to turn the light off on but 'Up In Smoke Tour' kept them distracted, but they kept making rap music, it was just marketed as non-gangsta and they went to the opposite side of the country back to the New York media market.

They weren’t trying to turn the light off on anything.  2Pac.  Snoop.  Ice Cube.  Dr. Dre.  Coolio.  Cypress Hill.  All West Coast.  All still getting mainstream play. It’s pretty simple logic here.  The artists who stayed consistent still had a fan base who supported them.  Death Row didn’t have a working relationship with any of their biggest stars so they sank.  Simple as that.


Like Suge said, he couldn't do it selling pop, he could only do it selling Death Row gangsta rap, which is true, which is why he put up those mad sales and brought his career back!

Couldn’t do it selling pop?  So prior to dropping “2001”, he didn’t put out a white rapper who sold millions of copies of his debut album, beat out Jennifer Lopez and Kid Rock for “Best New Artist” at the VMA’s, and was a regular guest on TRL?  Are we implying that “My Name Is” was “Death Row gangsta rap”? 
 

love33

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Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2017, 11:49:45 PM »
Dre's career was as good as dead in the Mainstream when he left Death Row, before Pac & BIG even died. 

No, it wasn’t.  He was starting over from scratch from a creative/business standpoint but he was still in a position to make things happen.  His departure got him magazine covers.  He was at the 1996 VMA’s doing interviews but left when Pac/Suge arrived.  Interscope was backing him.  He was still in a very high demand.  He just hadn’t found his sound yet.  While “Been There, Done That” was critically, a lukewarm record, it still got spins and Dre performed it as a musical guest on Saturday Night Live. 

Did you watch that MTV Death Row cover I had in that other post? They said that he was finished and Suge was laughing how he sold his half for a dollar and he had all the masters. 

You’re confusing perception with reality.  Financially, giving up half of a multi-million-dollar company looks like a big “L” on the score card but the reality was Interscope had already secured him his own label deal, he had publishing rights on his music, and while the future of his career as a producer was uncertain, he wasn’t bankrupt and he wasn’t in a situation with the industry was no longer working with him.

In 91, Death Row never had an album, it wasn't
until somewhere in the 3rd/4th quarter that they started spinning singles for Chronic hard on MTV (I remember this as a kid being in grade school) -- "...G' Thang" quickly became the biggest track in the industry, and the album hit rap upside the head.   

Correction.  It would actually have been 1992.  Dre was still with NWA in 1991.  By 1992, the legal deals were still being worked out.  Death Row was supposed to sign a groundbreaking distribution deal with Sony that would have given them unprecedented control of their own catalog but Sony took it off the table once Eazy-E stepped in and threatened to sue any company that worked with Dre for interfering with a contracted artist.  The “Deep Cover” deal happened before Interscope/Priority came in.  This was still in the early days when Dick Griffey was going to have an ownership stake in Death Row and they were recording at Solar.  When Sony dropped out, Interscope stepped in, negotiated with Eazy and Ruthless to free up Dre’s contract, and convinced Suge to drop Dick Griffey as a business partner. 


The media pled guilty behind closed doors on Pac & BIG, and Suge pointed this out when they called him and told him to "Soften his lyrics" and he refused.

I can’t help but roll my eyes at this whole statement right here.  The media?  As if every single media conglomerate is just an individual entity that manifested itself into human form and called up Suge.  Stop drinking the cool-aid, man. As far as Suge refusing to soften his lyrics, firstly, Suge is not a recording artist so he can’t claim ownership of lyrics.  Secondly, in a Vibe article, released around the time of his prison sentencing, he admitted that he had agreed with C. DeLeroes Tucker that Death Row would no longer release albums with use of the “N” word on them.  He later, of course, reneged, but this contradicts your theory that he refused to change the music. 


You're right, Dre went soft with "Aftermath Presents.. ", which is why it didn't sell like Dre was used to (1 million vs. what Dre normally sells). 


Now, you’re applying a contradictory logic.  According to you, Death Row was “rocking the charts” with a double album that went gold, sold 400,000 copies, and didn’t have a single hit record.  Aftermath put out a single-disc compilation that went platinum, sold a million copies, and had a moderately successful radio hit.  They followed that up with another million copies, platinum plaque, and #1 chart position for The Firm project.  A million copies is flopping but 800k on a double album is rocking the charts?


If you told me they had something to replace it with... they didn't replace Death Row with techno, they replaced it with... RAP -- DMX, Cash Money, No Limit

They didn’t replace anything.  The artists who were popular at Death Row (2Pac, Dre, Snoop) were still selling.  When Death Row put out Tupac projects, they still sold.  They just didn’t have any new stars that were making hits and they didn’t have the resources to properly build them up.


They weren't West Coast G's, which is what they were trying to turn the light off on but 'Up In Smoke Tour' kept them distracted, but they kept making rap music, it was just marketed as non-gangsta and they went to the opposite side of the country back to the New York media market.

They weren’t trying to turn the light off on anything.  2Pac.  Snoop.  Ice Cube.  Dr. Dre.  Coolio.  Cypress Hill.  All West Coast.  All still getting mainstream play. It’s pretty simple logic here.  The artists who stayed consistent still had a fan base who supported them.  Death Row didn’t have a working relationship with any of their biggest stars so they sank.  Simple as that.


Like Suge said, he couldn't do it selling pop, he could only do it selling Death Row gangsta rap, which is true, which is why he put up those mad sales and brought his career back!

Couldn’t do it selling pop?  So prior to dropping “2001”, he didn’t put out a white rapper who sold millions of copies of his debut album, beat out Jennifer Lopez and Kid Rock for “Best New Artist” at the VMA’s, and was a regular guest on TRL?  Are we implying that “My Name Is” was “Death Row gangsta rap”? 


Quote
Couldn’t do it selling pop?  So prior to dropping “2001”, he didn’t put out a white rapper who sold millions of copies of his debut album, beat out Jennifer Lopez and Kid Rock for “Best New Artist” at the VMA’s, and was a regular guest on TRL?  Are we implying that “My Name Is” was “Death Row gangsta rap”? 
Yes, he put Eminem out, but Eminem's raps were just as hard or harder than any artist -- that second Eminem album was his hardest, and he was bashing everyone on that record and talking about choking his ex-girlfriend -- He sounds no different lyrically than any other artist on "Dr. Dre 2001" -- just hard raw rap

Quote
No, it wasn’t.  He was starting over from scratch from a creative/business standpoint but he was still in a position to make things happen.
A LOT of people said "Dre fell off" and "Dre went bitch" in 1996 thru 1998 when a lot of fans were siding with 2Pac/Suge on everything -- Dre addressed this in his "2001" album when he said "Haters say Dre fell off? How Nigga? My Last Album was The Chronic/ they say raps changed, they wanna know how I feel about it/"

Dre also said when he was working on his 3rd version of Detox around 2004-05 that he scrapped the whole album twice and is now re-recording it with a brand new concept, he mentioned that's its going to be like a "Hip-Hop Movie" with different characters -- A Crooked I track "Say Dr. Dre" leaked out that was rumored to be in accordance with it, as he was rumored to be in the Dre studio -- the track was "Say Dr. Dre" where Crooked I plays Dr. Dre on the track (he acts like he is Dr. Dre when he raps Dre's story) -- Dre said 64s, blunts, and khakis are played out and we already heard that, and he was doing something revolutionary, a completely different concept --

He definitely bounced back from what was a bad financial departure for him at Death Row, along with his image being burned from 2Pac dissing him -- he bounced back with that Interscope deal even though a lot of people thought "The Aftermath" album was a disappointment

Dre tested the water with the Swizz Beatz track and a couple others and his sound on the "Compton" compilation but he never released "The Detox" which many say because he didn't want a bump on his resume (he has the 2 platinum solo albums, he doesn't want a low selling performer in his catalog) -- He made so much money on Beats by Dr Dre that he really had no motive to push music anymore --


Quote
When Sony dropped out, Interscope stepped in, negotiated with Eazy and Ruthless to free up Dre’s contract, and convinced Suge to drop Dick Griffey as a business partner. 
Yes, and Death Row was actually called "Future Shock Records" and had a different logo, before they changed the name

Quote
he admitted that he had agreed with C. DeLeroes Tucker that Death Row would no longer release albums with use of the “N” word on them.
I remembered hearing this that she asked him, but I didn't know he actually agreed to this at any point? If you listen to Dr. Dre Presents "The Aftermath" it sounds like a watered down version compared to what we're used to hearing with gangsta records, he definitely toned that record down -- Suge said Jimmy came to him personally and he met with Interscope and wanted a huge tone down.  I think Suge may have said he wasn't going to use many curse words on the "Death Row Christmas" album when he talked to Deloris Tucker -- but I don't ever remember him having any agreement with her to tone it down -- but it is true the media wasn't in the mood to promote MC Eiht-like shoot-em-up records that we heard allover the radio in 1992 -- they really wanted to take rap into a new direction -- which is why you started seeing records like "Just the Two of Us", "Parents Just Don't Understand", and "I'm taking a trip down to Miami" from Will Smith -- that was a MAJOR shift from what we were used to hearing with rap music -- then these conscious rappers like COMMON started getting phased in the tracklist then the "BLING BLING era" tookoff with Juvenile, Hot Boys, and Jermaine Dupri, Jay-z, and Busta Rhymes began to fill out the playlists that were once West-heavy Domino, Comptons Most Wanted, DRS, Ice Cube, Naughty By Nature, and the sound we were so used to hearing from the turn of the decade
 

Jay Wallace

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2017, 01:24:31 PM »
Yes, he put Eminem out, but Eminem's raps were just as hard or harder than any artist -- that second Eminem album was his hardest, and he was bashing everyone on that record and talking about choking his ex-girlfriend -- He sounds no different lyrically than any other artist on "Dr. Dre 2001" -- just hard raw rap.

He sounds drastically different lyrically from a lot of the artists on 2001.  One can certainly make the argument that the content is harder and more aggressive than most Top 40 radio but it still has a strong pop sensibility to the presentation.  There is no confusing “My Name Is” with the Death Row formula.

A LOT of people said "Dre fell off" and "Dre went bitch" in 1996 thru 1998 when a lot of fans were siding with 2Pac/Suge on everything -- Dre addressed this in his "2001" album when he said "Haters say Dre fell off? How Nigga? My Last Album was The Chronic/ they say raps changed, they wanna know how I feel about it/"

As I already said, that’s “perception”.  Critics and fans were not favorable to Dre in this period.  That’s not the same as “Dre’s career being as good as dead”.

Dre also said when he was working on his 3rd version of Detox around 2004-05 that he scrapped the whole album twice and is now re-recording it with a brand new concept, he mentioned that's its going to be like a "Hip-Hop Movie" with different characters -- A Crooked I track "Say Dr. Dre" leaked out that was rumored to be in accordance with it, as he was rumored to be in the Dre studio -- the track was "Say Dr. Dre" where Crooked I plays Dr. Dre on the track (he acts like he is Dr. Dre when he raps Dre's story) -- Dre said 64s, blunts, and khakis are played out and we already heard that, and he was doing something revolutionary, a completely different concept --

Why did you decide to write some random anecdote about Croooked I ghostwriting for Detox in the middle of a conversation about Dre’s career in 1996-98?  I don’t know if you have severe ADHD or something but try to stay on-topic.  This is just confusing. 

Dre tested the water with the Swizz Beatz track and a couple others and his sound on the "Compton" compilation but he never released "The Detox" which many say because he didn't want a bump on his resume (he has the 2 platinum solo albums, he doesn't want a low selling performer in his catalog) -- He made so much money on Beats by Dr Dre that he really had no motive to push music anymore --

Yet another completely pointless anecdote that has nothing to do with the points I presented. 

I remembered hearing this that she asked him, but I didn't know he actually agreed to this at any point? If you listen to Dr. Dre Presents "The Aftermath" it sounds like a watered down version compared to what we're used to hearing with gangsta records, he definitely toned that record down -- Suge said Jimmy came to him personally and he met with Interscope and wanted a huge tone down.  I think Suge may have said he wasn't going to use many curse words on the "Death Row Christmas" album when he talked to Deloris Tucker -- but I don't ever remember him having any agreement with her to tone it down.

Nope.  Nothing to do with “Death Row Christmas”.  It was printed a Vibe article that came out after Suge was sentenced to prison.  It was a statement he put out through his lawyer that Vibe printed.  It’s included in this great 2Pac book that Vibe put out with all the articles they did on Pac from his start of his career until the first couple years after his death.  Lots of articles on Death Row too.

https://www.amazon.com/Tupac-Shakur-Vibe-Magazine/dp/0609802178/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1489864349&sr=8-1&keywords=vibe+2pac

But it is true the media wasn't in the mood to promote MC Eiht-like shoot-em-up records that we heard allover the radio in 1992.

MC Eiht was not all over the radio in 1992.  You seem to be confused with music that excels in niche categories and music that actually crosses over into the pop charts. 

And enough with what the media “was in the mood” to promote.  Promotion isn’t based on personal feelings.   

Which is why you started seeing records like "Just the Two of Us", "Parents Just Don't Understand", and "I'm taking a trip down to Miami" from Will Smith -- that was a MAJOR shift from what we were used to hearing with rap music
 

“Parents Just Don’t Understand” was released in 1988, not 1998.   

You continue to show a staggering ignorance of pop culture in the 90’s and want to believe that mainstream music was made up entirely of gangsta rap and then suddenly, shifted into other music.  It’s always about trends.  People grow tired of things, artists become complacent, and styles evolve. 

Cookie-cutter rap was always selling.  The year that N.W.A. dropped “Niggaz4Life”, MC Hammer and Vanilla Ice were selling hundreds of millions of copies of profanity-free dance rap with videos of them wearing baggy pants and promoting kid-friendly messages.  The same year “The Chronic” came out, Jermaine Dupri introduced a child rap act called Kriss Kross who did quadruple-platinum.  Tag Team had a 4x platinum hit single with “Whoomp! There It is”.  Arrested Development also were selling like crazy and won Grammys in 1992.  The Fugees went six-time platinum off “The Score” in 1996, which was conscious rap.  Tribe Called Quest also were big at this point. Will Smith’s goofy theme song from “Men in Black” was one of the biggest rap songs of year in 1997. 

This MAJOR shift didn’t happen.  There was always plenty of softer, more dance-friendly hip-hop music getting radio play. 

then these conscious rappers like COMMON started getting phased in the tracklist then the "BLING BLING era" tookoff with Juvenile, Hot Boys, and Jermaine Dupri, Jay-z, and Busta Rhymes began to fill out the playlists that were once West-heavy Domino, Comptons Most Wanted, DRS, Ice Cube, Naughty By Nature, and the sound we were so used to hearing from the turn of the decade

So much misinformation to cover here…

1) There was no major spike in radio play for Common between 1997-99.  He was getting about as much rotation on his second album as he did with the first one that came out in 1994.

2) Jermaine Dupri wasn’t beginning to fill out track lists at this point either.  He came on the scene with So So Def prior to Death Row releasing the Chronic.  He had steady hits with Kris Kross and Da Brat all through out the mid-90’s.

3) Busta Rhymes’ breakout year as a solo artist was 1995 but was relatively known prior to that, thanks to his work with Leaders of the New School and collaborations with Tribe called Quest.  He made several major appearances on Yo! MTV Raps and also had a big role in Higher Learning.  Radio was playing him for years.

4) Comptons Most Wanted were not a major radio group.  Period. 

5) Naughty By Nature were not “West heavy”.  They were from New Jersey.  They represented the East Coast.  Treach’s friendship with Pac stems from Pac’s days when he was on the East Coast.

Do you know anything about the history of hip-hop music outside of the West Coast at all?
 

sofdark

Re: Los Angeles Vs. Everybody
« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2017, 05:31:33 PM »
Add Bishop Lamont, YG, Hopsin to the list