Author Topic: My phone > iPhone (Now: My phone = iPhone)  (Read 23308 times)

eS El Duque

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #500 on: June 14, 2008, 01:23:41 PM »
Whats the best phone out there right now? That has almost everything?


HTC Tytn II or Iphone?

Or are there others


i ened help becuase im gonna get rid of my two year old pearl soon
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AnybodyKilla

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #501 on: June 14, 2008, 01:37:17 PM »
Whats the best phone out there right now? That has almost everything?


HTC Tytn II or Iphone?

Or are there others


i ened help becuase im gonna get rid of my two year old pearl soon


LOL, you cant compare those 2 phones. It depends on how much you wanna spend dude. The iPhone is $200 and the Tytn II is $800 LOL!!!
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #502 on: June 14, 2008, 02:24:25 PM »
Whats the best phone out there right now? That has almost everything?
HTC Tytn II or Iphone?
Or are there others
I ened help becuase im gonna get rid of my two year old pearl soon

LOL, you cant compare those 2 phones. It depends on how much you wanna spend dude.
The iPhone is $200 and the Tytn II is $800 LOL!!!

200$ for a iPhone is with a two year contract.
800$ for HTC TyTN2 is without anything,I´m pretty sure you can get it for about the same if you sign up for a two year contract.
By the way HTC TyTN2 is called Tilt on AT&T.
Edit;
Quote
AT&T Tilt/HTC TyTN2
http://www.wireless.att.com/businesscenter/atttilt/


Save $100 on the AT&T Tilt after Mail-in Rebate promotion card*
*Pay $399.99 and after mail-in rebate, receive a $100 AT&T promotion card.
Requires 2 year agreement and qualified voice and data plans.
That means you can get HTC TyTN2 for 299$  ;)


Anyways check out these;

HTC Touch Diamond Windows Mobile 6.1/Touch UI,GPS,3.2 MPX camera,WLAN,3G
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1848414#msg1848414


HTC Touch Diamond review;
http://www.mobile-review.com/pda/review/htc-touch-diamond-en.shtml


Sony Ericsson C905 8.1 MPX camera,GPS,WLAN,3G ++
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1875493#msg1875493





Nokia N96; 16GB internal memory + memory stick slot,TV,GPS,WLAN,3G
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1794705#msg1794705


Nokia N96 review;
http://www.mobile-review.com/review/nokia-n96-en.shtml






Sony Ericsson XPERIA X1 Windows Mobile/Touch UI,3.2 MPX camera,GPS,WLAN,3G
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1744399#msg1744399
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1757215#msg1757215

« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 11:15:08 PM by tusken RAIDEr »
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #503 on: June 14, 2008, 02:52:50 PM »
the tytyn 2 is pretty much the opposite of a flashy, user friendly UI based consumer phone (iphone) - its a typical business style windows mobile affair, although it does have pretty much every feature. the x1 looks very interesting cause its gonna have all those smartphone features (qwerty keyboard, touchscreen, wi-fi, gps etc) and try to combine a more user friendly UI into the windows mobile build (either v6.1 or rumoured 6.5)

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #504 on: June 14, 2008, 03:22:29 PM »
the tytyn 2 is pretty much the opposite of a flashy, user friendly UI based consumer phone (iphone) -
its a typical business style windows mobile affair, although it does have pretty much every feature.
the x1 looks very interesting cause its gonna have all those smartphone features (qwerty keyboard, touchscreen, wi-fi, gps etc)
and try to combine a more user friendly UI into the windows mobile build (either v6.1 or rumoured 6.5)
Sony Ericsson XPERIA X1
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1744399#msg1744399
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1757215#msg1757215



Sure,but they can install this;
Quote
Spb Mobile Shell 2.0 released; Windows Mobile users rejoice
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/03/04/spb-mobile-shell-20-released-windows-mobile-users-rejoice.html


Spb Mobile Shell 2.0 has been released.
http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=109&STORY=/www/story/03-04-2008/0004767108&EDATE=
The new version doesn't just look better (there's a great choice of haptic animation),
but is also faster and lower in memory consumption.
Aside from the previous version's "classics" like concise
"Now Screen," World Time, photo speed deal, launcher,color-based themes and fast/smart contact search —
version 2.0 also features full screen dialogs for Weather and Time, animated transitions, navigation with gestures(like HTC's TouchFLO).
In addition, the Spb Mobile Shell now packs all functionality in one tabbed window, making the app run much faster.

I could go on and on, but it's the Spb's website
http://www.spbsoftwarehouse.com/products/mobileshell/?en
where you should get the detailed info.
If you own Windows Mobile 5 or 6 powered device, this is the app to have.
It costs $29.95 and it's worth every penny!


Or go for this hot joint;
HTC Touch Diamond
http://www.dubcnn.com/connect/index.php?topic=152903.msg1848414#msg1848414


HTC Touch Diamond review;
http://www.mobile-review.com/pda/review/htc-touch-diamond-en.shtml



« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 11:06:47 PM by tusken RAIDEr »
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #505 on: June 14, 2008, 08:28:34 PM »
something really puts me off any phone that relies entirely on touch screen technology - the lovely touch cruise, that shiny diamond one and even the iphone. im not really a massive fan of touch screens in general but they do work well on the more computery phones eg. windows mob based devices. those devices normally have standard keys to fall back on anyway and a keyboard which is ace for any type of messaging.

if i could afford to get two devices this year i think it would have to be the X1 and that new 8.1MP cybershot model - both from SE (well kind of, the X1 is HTC/SE). it might have to be one or the other so i'm hoping the X1 delivers on all fronts and it'll most likely be that. most worrying is the whole sqaures thing they got going for the menus - it needs to have plenty of ram and processor speed to have 0 slowdown. unfortunately i've read it could be slightly lacking in atleast one of those areas. the cybershot one will have a much much better still camera and probably much better video recording too, which is ofcourse appealing. however the X1 apparently still does VGA video recording and ofcourse the windows OS means i'd be able to run a full version (cracked) of tom tom on it and have excellent functionality of the GPS hardware.

tough one! i aint even looking at nokia's offerings though. i will admit the N95 8GB is very nice model indeed, especially in terms of packed-in features and pocketability - i hooked up a few friends up with ridicolous contracts on it before i quit vodafone. hardly any returns on it in general too. still, it aint really the killer device for myself. SE have gone through a terrible patch though - the performance of their new firmware on the w910i/K850i was absolute pants and pissed loads of people off with it getting corrupt on the sms inbox (essentially breaking the phone). they ironed it out now, but still, not a good look when nokia really got their shit together with the N95 8GB and have had some other very very popular models on the market like the 6300.

the K850i was just a terrible idea in the first place from a design point of view and given their track record with sturdy, reliable models. being the dude that i am my normal phone is still the K810i - a nice refresh on the classic K800i. awesome battery life, rock solid fast firmware, great still cam with xenon flash, decent music playback features, great looks and NO TOUCH SCREEN BULLSHIT. hopefully with these upcoming models SE are gonna be back on top of their game and give those generally unreliable nokia's a good beating. i like the way they don't rush to get the latest features in their devices and hopefully the GPS side of their devices is gonna be a solid addition.

oh and all of samsung's recent offerings have been absolute poo - their crappy iphone replicas (F700, F570 or whatever the newer one is) are just that, crappy - they should stick to what they're good at and whats good - nice small cameraphones without stupid touch sensitive panels. the G600 is pretty much the only model they've done to fit that criteria in the last year and its also been the best device on their consumer range. rant over!
« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 08:40:51 PM by Matty »
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #506 on: June 14, 2008, 09:27:22 PM »
something really puts me off any phone that relies entirely on touch screen technology - the lovely touch cruise, that shiny diamond one and even the iphone. im not really a massive fan of touch screens in general but they do work well on the more computery phones eg. windows mob based devices.
those devices normally have standard keys to fall back on anyway and a
keyboard which is ace for any type of messaging.

I hear what you´re saying.
I´m tired of touch screens myself. I had SE P800,P900 and P990.
But this new joint combines both keys and touch screen;
SE G900



Review of GSM/UMTS-smartphone Sony Ericsson G900
http://www.mobile-review.com/review/sonyericsson-g900-en.shtml

if i could afford to get two devices this year i think it would have to be the X1 and that new 8.1MP cybershot model - both from SE (well kind of, the X1 is HTC/SE).
it might have to be one or the other so i'm hoping the X1 delivers on all fronts and it'll most likely be that.
most worrying is the whole sqaures thing they got going for the menus -
it needs to have plenty of ram and processor speed to have 0 slowdown.
unfortunately i've read it could be slightly lacking in atleast one of those areas.
the cybershot one will have a much much better still camera and probably much better video recording too, which is ofcourse appealing. however the X1 apparently still does VGA video recording and ofcourse the windows OS means i'd be able to run a full version (cracked)
of tom tom on it and have excellent functionality of the GPS hardware.

tough one! i aint even looking at nokia's offerings though. i will admit the N95 8GB is very nice model indeed, especially in terms of packed-in features and pocketability - i hooked up a few friends up with ridicolous contracts on it before i quit vodafone. hardly any returns on it in general too. still, it aint really the killer device for myself. SE have gone through a terrible patch though - the performance of their new firmware on the w910i/K850i was absolute pants and pissed loads of people off with it getting corrupt on the sms inbox (essentially breaking the phone). they ironed it out now, but still, not a good look when nokia really got their shit together with the N95 8GB and have had some other very very popular models on the market like the 6300.

What about;
Nokia N96?


It got killer specs.

Nokia N96 review;
http://www.mobile-review.com/review/nokia-n96-en.shtml

the K850i was just a terrible idea in the first place from a design point of view and given their track record with sturdy, reliable models. being the dude that i am my normal phone is still the K810i - a nice refresh on the classic K800i. awesome battery life, rock solid fast firmware, great still cam with xenon flash, decent music playback features, great looks and NO TOUCH SCREEN BULLSHIT. hopefully with these upcoming models SE are gonna be back on top of their game and give those generally unreliable nokia's a good beating. i like the way they don't rush to get the latest features in their devices and hopefully the GPS side of their devices is gonna be a solid addition.

Don´t all the SE phones with GPS have wayfinder pre-installed?

oh and all of samsung's recent offerings have been absolute poo - their crappy iphone replicas (F700, F570 or whatever the newer one is) are just that, crappy - they should stick to what they're good at and whats good - nice small cameraphones without stupid touch sensitive panels. the G600 is pretty much the only model they've done to fit that criteria in the last year and its also been the best device on their consumer range. rant over!


Don´t really care so much about Samsung either.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 11:05:01 PM by tusken RAIDEr »
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #507 on: June 15, 2008, 10:36:02 AM »
i've said this plenty of times already but the N96 looks identical to the the N81 in terms of design and build. i know technically it sounds good but remember that the N81 design was horrible - poor quality, badly placed buttons, shiny surface that was terrible for fingerprints and generally a lack of durability or reliability. i'm sure the software will be much better but the actual case design (being the same as the N81) is awful - i wouldn't go anywhere near it. seems like a step backward as the N95 design was alright. maybe a bit sqaure but very usable.

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #508 on: June 15, 2008, 03:37:58 PM »
I've said this plenty of times already but the N96 looks identical to the the N81 in terms of design and build.

Nokia N81


Nokia N96


I know technically it sounds good but remember that the N81 design was horrible
- poor quality, badly placed buttons, shiny surface that was terrible for fingerprints and generally a lack of durability or reliability.
I'm sure the software will be much better but the actual case design (being the same as the N81) is awful - i wouldn't go anywhere near it. seems like a step backward as the N95 design was alright. maybe a bit sqaure but very usable.

Nokia N95 8GB



True,I hated my N95. Sliders suck.
But what about;
SE G900 About the same specs as N95/N82,but bar design



Review of GSM/UMTS-smartphone Sony Ericsson G900
http://www.mobile-review.com/review/sonyericsson-g900-en.shtml
 

eS El Duque

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #509 on: June 15, 2008, 05:22:36 PM »
I guess its down to the Diamond or SE X..or that 8.1MP

too many of my friends got the N95 (havnt seen any N96 since it aint out yet?)

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Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #510 on: June 15, 2008, 05:33:43 PM »
that G900 looks ok in the pic but i don't see the need for it to have a touch screen display and that looks like the symbian OS that sony have been using again. only a LED flash for the camera too so it aint as good as the other cybershot models in that respect either.

doesn't look like a very well thought out model if you ask me - is it a cameraphone? - no the flash is crappy. is it a business style device? - no its too small and probably lacks a lot of pda-esque features. i dunno what its trying to be but i'd predict there wont be a big market for it for that reason. the other touch screen SE models with the symbian OS have been slow, cumbersome and glitchy (newer p series devices, w950/w960).

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #511 on: June 15, 2008, 05:59:52 PM »
I guess its down to the
HTC Diamond
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/f_vKsxOT3Lw&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/f_vKsxOT3Lw&amp;hl=en</a>

or Sony Ericsson Xperia X1
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Q9C3zUJIi1k&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Q9C3zUJIi1k&amp;hl=en</a>

or that SE C905 8.1MP


too many of my friends got the N95 (havnt seen any N96 since it aint out yet?)

Nokia N96 review;
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/nyUkNDcD3Lg&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/nyUkNDcD3Lg&amp;hl=en</a>

-I believe FunkyAssTony said that N96 is available is Asia,so it should hit Europe and the US in a minute.
-SE C905 is not available yet neither is SE Xperia X1. (coming in September).
-HTC Diamond is available;
http://store.fastcommerce.com/prod_ENGADGETMOBILESLIMITED-ff80818119f1676e011a2a93f9b8225c.html
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #512 on: June 15, 2008, 06:18:40 PM »
that G900 looks ok in the pic but i don't see the need for it to have a touch screen display
and that looks like the symbian OS that sony have been using again.
only a LED flash for the camera too so it ain't as good as the other cybershot models in that respect either.

doesn't look like a very well thought out model if you ask me
- is it a cameraphone? - no the flash is crappy.
-is it a business style device? - no its too small and probably lacks a lot of pda-esque features.
i dunno what its trying to be but I'd predict there wont be a big market for it for that reason.
the other touch screen SE models with the symbian OS have been slow, cumbersome and glitchy (newer p series devices, w950/w960).

Yes,it's runs Symbian OS 3.3,and it's targeted at the consumer market not business.
So assume it's some sort of budget smart phone with good specs.

Sony Ericsson G900 Video Preview as you can see the menu speed is fast,the new UI looks nice.
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/VzV-6Ocpecs&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/VzV-6Ocpecs&amp;hl=en</a>
 

ToOoOoN!!!

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #513 on: June 16, 2008, 04:25:36 PM »
yup the n96 is available in Asia
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #514 on: June 16, 2008, 04:42:35 PM »
the middle button on the X1 is touch sensitive!!! >:( the lady even jokes its not responding the first time she presses in the video. what's the obsession with this touch sensitive marketing gimmick bullshit? would anyone in their right minds use a touch pad on a laptop over a mouse? maybe for larger things that you cant miss but for any medium/small sized button its way too unreliable. i will always fly the flag for standard buttons as they work 100% of the time - not 70% of the time and with extra care to make sure you press it right. cheaper to produce too.

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #515 on: June 16, 2008, 04:45:07 PM »
hang on a second are the navigation keys on the new 8.1mp cybershot model touch sensitive too? ;|

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #516 on: June 16, 2008, 11:11:51 PM »
the middle button on the X1 is touch sensitive!!! >:(
the lady even jokes its not responding the first time she presses in the video.
what's the obsession with this touch sensitive marketing gimmick bullshit?

You can set it on default and use it as a straight D-Pad.
So don´t worry  ;)

would anyone in their right minds use a touch pad on a laptop over a mouse?

YES,I love my touch pad on my MAC Book. I don´t fuck with the mouse  ;)

maybe for larger things that you cant miss but for any medium/small sized button its way too unreliable.
i will always fly the flag for standard buttons as they work 100% of the time
- not 70% of the time and with extra care to make sure you press it right. cheaper to produce too.

Maybe I´m used to it.... Don´t know if I want it on my phone though  :P


hang on a second are the navigation keys on the new 8.1mp cybershot model touch sensitive too? ;|


Where did you see/read that?
I might be wrong but I think I read somewhere that the D-Pad on N96 is touch sensitive.
Anyway I´m sure you can set it on default and use it as a normal D-Pad if so.
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #517 on: June 17, 2008, 06:19:21 AM »
the silver cybershot looks gangsta! gotta gets me one of those...

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #518 on: June 18, 2008, 04:44:37 PM »
no camera? smh lol   ;)   ;D ;D
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

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Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #519 on: June 20, 2008, 11:46:22 PM »
News;

Quote
Firefox and Opera coming to iPhone
http://www.intomobile.com/2008/06/20/firefox-and-opera-coming-to-iphone.html


If there's one thing the iPhone isn't lacking anymore is considerable third-party developer support. With the Apple AppStore slated to launch a few weeks, we are seeing iPhone applications of all sorts getting ready to make life easier/funner/more informed for iPhone users. But, until now nobody seems to have given much thought to a third-party web-browser for the iPhone.

Third-party web-browsers would not only give iPhone users more choice in how they want to play with their web-access, but it could even open up the possibility of seeing third-party plug-ins that could allow Flash to finally work on the iPhone.

iPhone Atlas has an interesting take on this. The problem with third-party web-browsers is that Apple's own iPhone SDK agreement seems to essentially block development in this arena:

“No interpreted code may be downloaded and used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple’s Published APIs and built-in interpreter(s) […] An Application may not itself install or launch other executable code by any means, including without limitation through the use of a plug-in architecture, calling other frameworks, other APIs or otherwise.”

Now, the question is just how the above verbiage can be interpreted. If it turns out that Apple won't allow for third-party applications to rock plug-ins or for any non-Webkit HTML/Javascript renderers, then web-browsers like Mozilla's Gecko-based Firefox could be dead in the water. On the other hand, if Mozilla can find a way to make their mobile web browser work on the iPhone, we're all going to be going on an interesting ride.

That is, if Apple allows for competition to their iPhone Safari browser to hit the AppStore.


Quote
Ringtones for dogs coming to Japanese cellphones
http://www.engadget.com/2008/06/20/ringtones-for-dogs-coming-to-japanese-cellphones/


Just when you think you've given your dog everything it could ever want (gold plated water dish, rhinestone collar, a copy of Tegan and Sara's "The Con" on vinyl) the Japanese go and one up you. A Tokyo-based content provider named Dwango announced today that it would start selling specialized ringtones which can be heard only by dogs. The service, called Inu ni shika kikoenai chakushinon (ringtones only dogs can hear) will make free downloads available to current DoCoMo i-mode subscribers. No word on whether the company will provide Bluetooth headsets and holsters suited to our canine friends, but we understand plans are in the works for a line of bacon-themed wallpapers. [Warning: read link is a PDF, and it's in Japanese]


^^^^^ :P :P :P :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: ^^^^^



Quote
Hands on with the Garmin Nuviphone
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/PwCJMqFWUck&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/PwCJMqFWUck&amp;hl=en</a>

^^^^ looks alright ^^^


Quote
Esato view on Sony Ericsson C905 Cyber-shot
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/4Hr3WqodLvI&amp;hl=en&amp;autoplay=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/4Hr3WqodLvI&amp;hl=en&amp;autoplay=0</a>


Quote
Sony Ericsson's C905 Cyber-shot is now official
http://www.mobileburn.com/news.jsp?Id=4800

Today Sony Ericsson released the first ever Cyber-shot cameraphone to make use of the slider form factor. The new C905 Cyber-shot sports a high-end 8.1 megapixel camera with all of the goodies. Not only does it have autofocus, naturally, it also comes complete with face detection, image stabilization, red-eye reduction, a flash, and Sony Ericsson's BestPic and Smart Contrast support.

Of course, what high-end cell phone today would be complete without both GPS and aGPS built-in, with which to geo-tag the phone's photos? The C905 has that as well as software to handle picture and video blogging directly from the phone. The C905 supports an optional TV-out cable and can also broadcast over WiFi to a DLNA compatible television set.

Other features of note on the C905 include Microsoft Exchange Activesync support, video calling with its secondary camera, and full music support - including A2DP Bluetooth stereo, an FM radio, and the ability to play MP3 and AAC music files. The C905's 2.4", QVGA resolution display can show up to 262k colors and has an auto-rotate feature, and the phone ships with a 2GB M2 memory card to fit into its expansion slot.

The Sony Ericsson C905 measures up at 104mm x 49mm x 18mm (4.1" x 1.9" x .7") in size and weighs 136g (4.8oz). Sony Ericsson expects the C905 to be capable of 9 hours of GSM talk time or 4 hours of UMTS 3G talk time, and up to 15 days of standby time. It will be available in 3 configurations, all of them supporting at least quad-band GSM. The regular C905 will also support 2100MHz UMTS/HSDPA, the C905a will support 850/1900/2100MHz UMTS/HSDPA for the Americas, and the C905c will be just quad-band GSM for China. It is expected to reach retail shelves in Q4 of this year.








The specs of the SE C905 are as follows:

Connectivity: Quad-band GSM, with EDGE support
Display: 2.4” 320x 240 pixels, showing up to 262,144 colours
Camera: 8.1 megapixel camera, with Xenon flash, autofocus, smart contrast, image and video stabilizer, red-eye reduction, and BestPic
Music player formats: AAC and MP3
Memory: 160MB built-in, with M2 Micro card slot – 2GB card in-box
Extras: Bluetooth 2.0, with A2DP support, FM Radio, Wi-Fi, DLNA, GPS and aGPS
Dimensions: 104 x 49 x 18 mm
Weight: 136 grams



Quote
Review: HTC Touch Diamond, Right Off the Boat!
http://www.mobileburn.com/review.jsp?Id=4745


Yesterday I received an HTC Touch Diamond, one of the initial batch of the phones to ship for sale in Asia. The Touch Diamond represents HTC's second generation of finger touch based Windows Mobile Professional smartphones, and features the new TouchFLO 3D user interface extensions and home screen. While it is a bit hard to review this device since it only supports one lonely GSM band in the USA, 1900MHz GSM/EDGE, I can still give you folks an idea of what the device is like, and what its features and shortcomings are.
 


This won't be a full blown review, something I'll probably save until a North American variant is available, but I think that most Touch fans will find it interesting. On top of that, I've included 3 videos of the Touch Diamond in action, so you can get a better feel for what the device is really like.

Physical Aspects

This latest version of the Touch is smaller than the original. It is a bit taller, that's true, but it is both narrower and significantly thinner. It also weighs 5.5 grams or so less. Not a huge difference, but the changes make the Touch Diamond even more pocketable than the original. You can see a full list of Touch Diamond specs in our launch event story.

Like the original, the Touch Diamond sports a simple design. The front of the device is perfectly flat, consisting of two panels - one for the touchscreen, one for the controls. The controls include a home button, a back button, two call buttons, and a d-pad controller. The d-pad might only look like a round button, but there are four directional buttons that surround it that can be pressed. They are real buttons, not touch sensitive. There is a touch sensitive aspect to the d-pad, though, as when the user circles the center button with a finger tip, the device will zoom in or out when in an appropriate application like the photo viewer. I would really have liked to have seen this be used for regular menu and list scrolling as well, but that is not the case.

The rest of the device is quite simple. There are a pair of volume keys on the left edge, a power switch up top, a data/headset/USB port on the bottom, and the lens for the 3.2 megapixel camera around back. The back sports a very unsimple design, though, which features facets like a gemstone and a high gloss surface. I'm not fond of it at all, really, as it becomes overwhelmed by fingerprints and hand smudges almost instantly once it is handled.

The VGA resolution display on the Touch Diamond is great. 480x640 resolution just makes everything look much sharper. VGA displays first showed up on old PocketPC devices years ago, but this year is when they finally become mainstream. The touch action on the screen is also improved over the older models', and the advent of TouchFLO 3D makes flickable scrolling and such much easier. More on that later.

One last interesting feature is the stylus, which fits into a silo at the bottom right corner of the phone. It sports a magnetic latch instead of a normal snap-in design. I worry that the magnet a) might not be strong enough to hold the stylus securely, and b) might be strong enough to cause problems for credit cards and such. I do like how the phone switches on when the stylus is removed, but that could have been accomplished without a magnet.

If you wish to check out the Diamond's cool box and the various included goodies, head on over to DigitalBurn.com for the HTC Touch Diamond unboxing story.

Core Functions, Multimedia / Apps

The HTC Touch Diamond for Europe and Asia is equipped with tri-band (900/1800/1900MHz) GSM/EDGE and dual-band (900/2100MHz) UMTS/HSDPA support. This means that it is ill-suited for use in the U.S., where it would have to rely on the somewhat limited number of 1900MHz towers in use. Where we are at the moment, in central Florida, 1900MHz service is so bad from both U.S. GSM carriers as to make it almost impossible to test the Touch Diamond. As such, I can't really comment on call audio quality or EDGE/HSDPA data rates. HTC rates the Touch Diamond's battery as being capable of 16.5 days of standby time or 4.5 hours of talk time. Considering the small battery and our own, admittedly brief, experiences, I would suggest that these figures are probably quite optimistic, and that they will be the exception rather than the rule in the real world.
 


Like any other Windows Mobile device, the Touch Diamond has not only good contacts support, but also the ability to manage a user's appointments, tasks, and notes as well. Profile support in Windows Mobile 6.1 Professional OS is still limited, though, so the user will have to rely mostly on switching volume levels and silent/vibration modes with the volume controls.

WiFi on the Touch Diamond performed perfectly, and the Bluetooth system was even kind enough to automatically try the near-standard code of '0000' when I paired up a Jabra JX10 headset. Voice dialing is limited to pre-recorded tags, though, instead of using a much preferred speaker-independent system. The Diamond can be used with a USB connection for Activesync or as a dedicated USB mass storage device, which allows for faster file transfers. Activesync can also sync over the air with an Exchange server, which is what I did to get push email, calendar, contacts, and tasks.

The standard Windows Media player is on-board, but the new media player panel in the TouchFLO 3D home screen is more interesting, even if it doesn't seem to want to display album art for any of my songs. The autofocus camera works well in general, though at times the white balance needs to be set manually. The photos are generally sharp and can be stunning in the right conditions. With 4GB of internal storage, there is plenty of room for music and photos.

While Pocket Internet Explorer is available on the Touch Diamond, with finger scrolling and all, it is the Opera browser that is what people should really be interested in. It provides a near iPhone like browsing experience. Double tap for zooming (or use the d-pad zoom control), pan with a finger, whatever. The browser eats up a lot of the Diamond's free RAM, but the result is a desktop type browsing experience.

The Touch Diamond also features a wonderful YouTube Mobile player that shows very high quality video. Over a WiFi connection the buffering time was minimal, and as you can see in the YouTube video below, it works rather well. It is a very solid application. The Touch Diamond also includes a built-in GPS module for use with apps like Google Maps.


User Interface

The HTC Touch Diamond uses the company's new TouchFLO 3D user interface extensions and home screen. While the home screen applet on the first generation of Touch devices was only a small part of the whole, the home screen on the Touch Diamond is the center stage. Users can do everything from read email and text messages to control music, browse photos, and check the weather now. The system is setup as a series of panels that are linked on their left and right edges. The user can grab the active icon on the bottom of the screen to quickly move to any of the other panels, or can instead swipe a finger tip or nail (or stylus) across the screen to move right or left to a neighboring panel. The switching can be a bit slow at times, but the graphical effects are quite nice.
 


Once in a panel, a flick up or down will change the active item (song, photo, contact, etc) on display. Tapping on it will launch the item in the appropriate viewer or application. The new image viewer on the Diamond is quite nice, and makes good use of the phone's built-in orientation sensors (as does the new "Marble Madness" like Teeter game).

The deeper level applications on the Touch Diamond also benefit from HTC's handiwork. A finger can be used to scroll or flick most any list, and left to right swipes can do things like move to the next or previous account or message in the Inbox app. My only gripe is that while a fingernail or stylus can be used for scrolling in some parts of the system, like the home screen, only a fingertip can be used in most of the rest of the apps, since a fingernail or stylus would be used for selecting multiple items. This is a big inconsistency, but users will probably adapt to it and will be thankful for the more flexible system used on the home screen.

Another area where HTC has greatly improved upon the normal Windows Mobile experience is text input. HTC has new versions of its on-screen virtual T9 phone keypad, 20 key SureType keypad, and full QWERTY keyboard. All three of them work very well, and I am especially pleased with the full QWERTY keyboard, which makes it much easier to type on than you might have normally expected. It lacks the vibration feedback I was hoping for, like the iPhone, but the word completion and prediction are especially easy to use thanks to nature of the touchscreen - just tap the word and keep on typing.

Check out the videos of the Touch Diamond in action to get a far better feel for the work HTC has done than you can get by reading this text.


All is not good in the land of the Touch Diamond, though. In spite of HTC's claims, the software still seems not quite ready for primetime in my opinion. The camera, in particular, buggered out on me and left me in the touchscreen calibration app a few times (which required I complete the calibration 3 times in a row before it closed). What's the link between the camera and screen calibration? Beats me. On top of that, the home screen module can get quite sluggish when resources start dwindling. In spite of the device's claim of 113MB of RAM, HTC says the device is equipped with 192MB total. Regardless, I have seen free RAM get down to 20MB or so many a time in my tests. The home screen uses a lot of resources, it seems, and Opera can be very thirsty itself when viewing large desktop websites.

I also saw a few bugs that looked to be possibly related to the d-pad. Once I saw the call log get stuck going left (or right) on the top entry, which caused it to switch rapidly between that contact's various phone numbers and email addresses. It took a number of d-pad presses in various directions to get it to stop, so I am not convinced that it isn't necessarily a software issue. There have been a number of other random issues where the phone's software just seemed to have gotten stuck. I can't reproduce them, but they happen. A few more weeks worth of incubation would have probably been in order.

Conclusion

So what's the final word on the HTC Touch Diamond? Well, it would be "see", as in "Wait and see." I think it is just too early to say what the future holds for this device. Especially since I've been unable to test the GSM/UMTS radio portion of the device.

But this much I can say: the Touch Diamond is the coolest Windows Mobile Professional device I have used, bar none. I am very much looking forward to a North American version of the Diamond and its brother, the Touch Pro (AKA Raphael), with its large QWERTY keyboard. HTC is really on to something here, to be sure, and regardless of the problems that I experienced, I expect these TouchFLO 3D devices to sell by the millions.

But should you run out and buy one of these bad boys? Well, if you live in Asia or Europe, maybe. At least if you like bleeding edge devices. If you are a bit less adventurous, I would say wait a while to see how other people feel about the Diamond. If I lived in the right part of the world, I'd be using this phone, I can say that much. But just like the iPhone that it has its sights on, it isn't for everybody

HTC Touch Diamond Review - Part 1 of 3
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/dY-cu7BvFZw&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/dY-cu7BvFZw&amp;hl=en</a>

HTC Touch Diamond Review - Part 2 of 3, TouchFLO 3D
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/xE23duRUnuA&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/xE23duRUnuA&amp;hl=en</a>

HTC Touch Diamond Review - Part 3 of 3, Opera/YouTube/Camera
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/m-NFweHBe0w&amp;hl=en" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/m-NFweHBe0w&amp;hl=en</a>




Quote
Symbian turns ten
http://www.mobile-review.com/fullnews/main/index_eng.shtml


Symbian, the popular Operting System, used mainly on Nokia phones, but on Sony Ericsson, Samsung, and Motorola as well, has turned ten years old.. To celebrate this, Symbian has opened a dedicated site for its ten years of activeness, located here;
http://tenyears.symbian.com/timeline.php
On the site, you can browse a timeline, detailing various events, and devices. There are also several things you can listen to on the site – detailing Research and Development, as well as developers, and bonding with customers. You can also express you experience of Symbian, and sign the sites birthday card too.

Quote
Symbian OS
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbian

Symbian OS is a proprietary operating system, designed for mobile devices, with associated libraries, user interface frameworks and reference implementations of common tools, produced by Symbian Ltd. It is a descendant of Psion's EPOC and runs exclusively on ARM processors.

On June 24, 1998, Symbian Ltd. was formed as a partnership between Ericsson, Nokia, Motorola and Psion, to exploit the convergence between PDAs and mobile phones.

Symbian is currently owned by
Nokia (47.9%),
Sony Ericsson (28.7%),
Panasonic (10.5%),
Siemens AG (8.4%) and
Samsung (4.5%).
Although BenQ acquired the mobile phone subsidiary of Siemens AG, the Siemens AG stake in Symbian did not pass to BenQ.


Quote
History

June 2000
ericsson r380


Symbian´s first phone release and a forerunner to future SonyEricsson smartphones,
the R380 was a truly trailblasing flip-phone.
Specs;
http://www.gsmarena.com/ericsson_r380-195.php

May 2001
Nokia 9210

Specs;
http://www.gsmarena.com/nokia_9210i_communicator-319.php

June 2002
Nokia 7650

Specs;
http://www.gsmarena.com/nokia_7650-288.php

Oct 2002
SonyEricsson P800

Specs;
http://www.gsmarena.com/sony_ericsson_p800-326.php


Feb 2004
Motorola A 1000

Specs;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorola_A1000


Quote
SonyEricsson XPERIA X1 review;
http://www.boygeniusreport.com/2008/06/17/sony-ericsson-xperia-x1-review/


Now that we’ve had some time to spend with the XPERIA X1,
we’re going to break down the various features and give you our in-depth review.
We’ll continue to update this post as we use the device more, but it doesn’t a rocket scientist to understand what’s at hand
— a brand new Sony Ericsson XPERIA X1!


Screen:

With a 800×480 VGA screen, you can’t really go wrong right? Right.
We’ve got to say off the top that this is the best-looking screen we’ve ever seen on a Windows Mobile device.
It puts all the others to shame. It’s not just that the screen has an amazing resolution, it’s that the screen is vibrant and clear as day.
If your vision isn’t top notch you might have to increase the font size in settings because it gets a little small with that super high-res. Sunlight couldn’t phase it either as we had no problem using it on the go outside.

Audio quality

We didn’t put the speakers through our normal tests just yet to be honest.
We tried a couple MP3s and they sounded good, not great.
The speaker volume in general could have been a little louder and the sound could have sounded a little fuller.
Speakerphone was the same. We’ll report back with more detailed findings.

Notification lights

If you’ve seen the Sidekick LX, you’ll know what we’re talking about.
There are 4 independant notification lights on the four corners of the X1.
These are LED lights that change through various colors. Unlike the Sidekick, you have complete control over the notification settings.
Only want people to think you’ve got a UFO in your pocket when you’re getting a text message? No problem.
There’s a lot to choose from to suit your own needs.
The lights offer a nice touch and weren’t too over-powering and bright which we were afraid of. The kids will love it.

Call quality

Calls came in and out with crystal clear quality.
The ear speaker was plently loud and the party on the other end said we sounded like we were on a land line.

Data Connectivity

Name something you’d like to see in a mobile device… HSDPA? Wi-Fi? GPS? The X1 has all of it.
T-Mobile USA lovers will also be overjoyed at the fact that an AWS 1700MHz version is coming
 Our unit had the 850MHz/1900MHz US 3G bands so we were rockin’ over HSDPA just fine. In fact, web browsing was abnormally fast.
We didn’t find much of a difference between browsing over Wi-Fi or HSDPA.
That’s probably due to the bottleneck of the phone in general, but it was a pleasant surprise.

Build quality

Another winner for Sony Ericsson.
While the device isn’t the lightest phone on the market, we think it’s build quality is almost second-to-none.
Maybe even iPhone status. It’s just so sturdy and well put together. We have to give HTC some mad props on this one.
Could you please try and incorporate some of this newfound metal addition into some of your devices HTC? Please.
The sliding mechanism was fantastic even though the device isn’t a normal “flat” slider. Major points for build quality.

Usability factor

This could be subjective depending on your view of Windows Mobile,
but we found the X1 to be on par or better than any Windows Mobile device we’ve used.
Baring the keyboard issue, (see below) there wasn’t anything that hindered us from taking full advantage of the device.
When closed, the device gives you access to all necessary shortcuts on the bottom front of the unit.
Slide it open and you’ve got access to everything you could want.
People have wrote us and asked about how it is to use the phone when the QWERTY keyboard doesn’t have directional keys,
but they’ve overlooked something — the optical joystick. This works wonderfully well and doesn’t have a learning curve.
It’s a natural extension of what we’ve been forced to use in the past.
There was a “cursor” menu in settings but no cursor showed up on the screen.
You also have full control over the sensitivity of the optical joystick.
Making phone calls was comfortable and we didn’t have any issues with people hearing us or us hearing them.

Keyboard

The keyboard is a sensitive area for many people.
Anyone who follows us know we take it very seriously — we put them all through the ringer!
So, it pains us to report, that at least with our particular unit, the keyboard wasn’t great.
It didn’t take time to get used to it, it just didnt perform like the way we had hoped.
The reason is because the keys almost are completely flush with the case and don’t give good tactile feedback when pressed.
Odly enough, the spacebar was actually ok. It faired the best out of all of them.
We understand why there really is no travel in the keys
— there is a huge sliding mechanism right over them
— but we would have liked to see a little more feedback when typing.
They have this triangular pattern on top which does make it easy to feel them,
but you don’t get a good response when actually pressing them down.
The backlight on the QWERTY ‘board successfully helped us find the keys when it was nightime,
but that still didn’t help when typing.
We said this before, but if we had to compare the keyboard to anything, it would be Sony’s UX-series computers.
It’s the same exact thing.

« Last Edit: June 22, 2008, 09:26:01 PM by tusken RAIDEr »
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #520 on: June 22, 2008, 09:30:18 PM »
no camera? smh lol   ;)   ;D ;D

what are you talking about?
 

StevenMarkAss

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #521 on: June 23, 2008, 03:28:25 AM »
LOL
 

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #522 on: June 24, 2008, 02:00:07 AM »
News;

Quote
Motorola announces MOTOZINE ZN5
http://www.engadget.com/2008/06/23/motorola-announces-motozine-zn5/


Hints of Motorola's new MOTOZINE series of devices have gone back as far as last year,
but today marks the first time that Moto's officially spilled any beans on the goods.
The headlining feature on the first model, the ZN5 candybar, lies on the backside:
a 5-megapixel sensor courtesy of a partnership with Kodak, featuring autofocus, a xenon flash, image stitching,
and on-device integration with Kodak Gallery. Otherwise, you get WiFi (score),
Motorola's so-called "ModeShift" technology for morphing the keypad depending on device mode (a la the E8),
and a run-of-the-mill quadband GSM radio with EDGE. China's the first country to get the hookup starting next month,
but Moto expects to take the ZN5 on a world tour over the course of the remainder of the year.


Quote
Solar-powered Windows Mobile phone concept
http://www.mobile-review.com/fullnews/main/index_eng.shtml

A concept, created by Eddie Goh, named the Eclipse Intuit has been unveiled.
It's a Windows Mobile-powered handset, with a slide-out QWERTY keyboard.
As its solar-powered, it gets it energy from the Sun, but, not only that,
parts of the devices body are coated in a chemical-based skin of sorts, which helps replenish battery life.



his device isn't just a one-trick pony however, there's a five megapixel camera for cameraphone enthusiasts out there.
Not only is there a slide-out QWERTY keyboard, but a virtual one, on the handset's second screen, with tactile feedback support.

Quote
AOL releases new Windows Mobile AIM client, hell freezes over
http://www.boygeniusreport.com/2008/06/23/aol-releases-new-windows-mobile-aim-client-hell-freezes-over/



This is a happy, happy day for any AIM addicts toting around a Windows Mobile device.
There are 3rd party solutions (JiveTalk, what up!), but it’s always comforting to get a piece of software directly from the source.
AOL has finally released an updated AIM client, and boy does it look sexy!
We’re giving it a go right now but sadly, it doesn’t look as if we’ll get file transfers at the moment.
Let’s hope this feature makes it way into the final build as it is still in beta.
It also is said to be compatible with just about every Windows Mobile device — Standard or Professional, 5 or 6.
Anyone looking to give it a try?
Hit us up and let us know what the verdict is!
 

Matty

Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #523 on: June 24, 2008, 03:44:08 PM »
motorola suck. their rep round these areas was a very nice lady though :sombrero:

RAIDErs of the lost ark

  • Guest
Re: My phone > iPhone
« Reply #524 on: June 24, 2008, 11:27:57 PM »
motorola suck. their rep round these areas was a very nice lady though :sombrero:

Never been a fan of their products either,but they got a couple of Windows Mobile and Symbian devices,so I assume those are alright.

Quote
Motorola A1000 symbian
http://www.symbian.com/phones/mot_a1000.html


he Motorola A1000 is Motorola's third Symbian OS phone, and Symbian's sixth 3G handset in the market. The latest Symbian OS 3G phone, the Motorola A1000, has been designed to give mobile professionals a new way to communicate and share information. This stylish, cutting-edge mobile phone is perfect for the busy professional on the move, delivering video conferencing capabilities, Word®, Excel®, Powerpoint® and PDF® document viewing capabilities via Picsel™ Document Viewer and full HTML browsing for a true mobile office experience. With the added benefits of 3G speed and tri-band, users can feel the power and benefit of intelligent technology in the palm of their hand, anywhere they go. 

The A1000 also boasts an integrated 1.2 megapixel digital camera with 4x digital zoom, multimedia streaming, capture and playback with MPEG4 and MP3 files and dual-audio speakers.

Quote
Motorola Z10 symbian
http://www.symbian.com/phones/mot_z10.html?p=1


The MOTO Z10 is a stylish ergonomically designed kick-slider that features: a 2.2” QVGA screen displaying videos at 30 frames per second in millions of colours; external storage with up to 32GB of capacity; 3.2 megapixel camera and an auto focus and auto-save function ideal for media-sharing. It allows users to capture high-quality video, edit clips, create transitions between scenes and add title slides and a soundtrack. Users can then upload their creation to share with friends and family through any number of websites.

Quote
MOTO Q™ 9h global Windows Mobile
http://www.motorola.com/business/v/item.jsp?vgnextoid=acf9f89cae5b6110VgnVCM1000008406b00aRCRD&localeId=33


-3G
-GPS
etc.....